Joystiq readers redesign the PS3 controller

Since we started our latest redesign contest we've had an overwhelming response from you, our readers. Now we can proudly show you the winner of the contest, along with three runners-up! And the winner is...

Adam Portilla's (Chicago, IL) PS3 "Ball Controller" redesign!

Adam's design was an attempt to create a controller that could do everything the dual shock controller could do and more. At the same time he felt that it was important for it to stand out as something completely new and different. Innovations include a built-in microphone, bilateral symmetry (uh, the left side's the same as the right!) wireless capabilities and accuracte force feedback, made possible by its spherical construction. Most importantly the design was an attempt at simplicity and flexibility in terms of button placement. Well done Adam! Once you've sent us your precise address, we'll send off your copy of X3: The Reunion.

Our runners up include:

Einhanderkiller's remarkably accurate Playstation and Xbox 360 controller amalgamation. If Sony and Microsoft unexpectedly merged their next-gen console efforts, this is possibly what the controller would look like!

Charlie Tang's idea of tweaking the PS2's extremely popular Dual Shock controller was a very popular one. We got many entries including a picture of the Dual Shock under the heading "why fix what ain't broke?". Charlie went the extra mile with his Dual Shock tweak design. He took the number one complaint levied against the Dual Shock and set about fixing it. After speaking with friends he found that the main issue was the location of the left analog stick. So he moved it up to where the D-pad used to be and make the controller wireless. Nicely done.

Malte "Sagan" Sharupke's Lego brick inspired model really caught our eye because of its innovative "DIY" approach to controller design. Whilst the ergonomics are questionable (Lego bricks aren't the most comfortable things to hold!) the principles behind the design are excellent. As part of his design, he imagined that developers would be able to include their own parts for their own games. So if Nintendo doesn't bother to create one, you can build a sword to swipe at enemies in Zelda!

Thanks to all the people that entered the competition!

See also: Joystiq readers redesign the Nintendo DS

This article was originally published on Joystiq.