The Wall Street Journal reports on some gamers who're using their 1337 skillz to actually pay the billz. And they're not trotting out the same old story about professional gamers (we get it, they play games!), they're talking about gaming tutors.

The logic behind these enterprises is brilliant though. Aging gamers have no time to hone their skills through trial and error while high school dropouts, like Gaming-lessons.com's Tom Taylor, have nothing but time, so the arrangement works like this: you pay Taylor $45 clams an hour, he turns your pasty, corpulent game playing attempts into 100% chiseled, Master Chief-approved fragging skillz.

We know what you're thinking. If 8 year old Lil Poison is scraping in $25 an hour teaching grown men to play Halo 2, then you've made some serious miscalculations in your life plan. We're wondering why, if these guys are so good, they aren't playing professionally. Does the old adage, "Those who can't do, teach," apply to the curriculum of video games as well? We were wondering why they didn't play professionally until we learned (thanks, guys!) that Tom Taylor is in fact T Squared (Tom Taylor, duh!), the very same professional gamer who just signed a fat $250,000 contract. See, high school dropout isn't always a pejorative.

[Thanks, Leshrac]

[Update: corrected professional gaming errors and decidedly un-1337 spelling of 1337.]

This article was originally published on Joystiq.

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