Sony Chairman Howard Stringer is showing both teeth and scientific breakthrough. In a recent interview with The Guardian, Stringer was exuberant over the PlayStation 3's recent one-week triumph over Nintendo Wii in Japanese hardware sales. "I'm happy the Wii seems to be running a bit short of hardware," he said, before following up with the quip that the PS3 "will come into its own because its [high-end games] are infinitely more fun, demanding and exciting."

Infinitely more fun, you say? So how does one define infinite fun? Let's arbitrarily assign Wii games with a base number, we'll call 'W.' For conversion purposes, we'll let W equate to one anti-meh. Infinity itself is an abstract notion that we can obtain through various roundabout methods. For example, take the limit as 'n' approaches 0 of anti-meh divided by 'n.' (You can't directly divide by zero without the power of the Cell processor.)

This approach works for all scalars of anti-meh: oh, gee whiz, golly, awesome, sweet, wow, etc., which is convenient if a Wii game really is fun, then we can apply the limit (let's arbitrarily call it the "Sony limit") and obtain infinity, knocking the wind out of Nintendo's fun factor.

There are more accurate ways to obtain infinity, and we hear the Cell processor is actually capable of computing infinity directly to the nearest thousandth decimal place. As for the Wii, we heard from an independent source that the little console couldn't even handle two finite series duct tape together. It just kept waving its hands in the air hoping to fudge the right answer.

[Via GameDaily]

This article was originally published on Joystiq.

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