SCEA has filed a motion to dismiss a class action brought against the company for its removal of the PS3's "Other OS" feature, which allowed users to install Linux on the system. Sony argues that the lawsuit, a consolidation of seven similar suits filed last spring, fails to present evidence that the company overtly advertised Other OS in its marketing campaigns or on PS3 packaging.

Sony's filing also claims that the PS3 warranty, license agreement and the PlayStation Network Terms of Service "specifically provide PS3 purchasers with a license, not an ownership interest, in the software and in the use of the PSN, and provide that SCEA has the right to disable or alter software features or terminate or limit access to the PSN, including by issuing firmware updates," according to court documents obtained by IGN. (Other OS was removed with a firmware update; and users who decline any update are barred from PSN.)

Additionally, Sony has requested that the "class" allegations be stricken from the suit because the plaintiffs did not all use Other OS in the same way. In fact, one of them never used the feature at all. With Sony presenting some seemingly solid grounds for the lawsuit's dismissal, it might be prudent for the plaintiffs to call a key witness to the stand when the two parties meet before a judge on November 4. How about ... the United States Air Force?

This article was originally published on Joystiq.