Escape Goat makes a break for your browser this weekend

While Escape Goat has been available on the PC and Xbox Live Indie Games for quite a while now, the titular goat and his mousy companion are coming to a browser near you. This HTML5 port includes the full game, which centers around a goat and a mouse who are trying to escape from a prison full of ever-changing rooms. That old chestnut.

No matter your browser or operating system, you can play Escape Goat this weekend through Sunday, September 9, after which point a demo version will remain. So, feel free to go play it right now. While we'll leave it up to speculation why the two were imprisoned in the first place, know their escape is a noble cause – we'd never throw our support behind two guilty convicts.
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Escape Goat comes to the Browser - Full Xbox/PC Game in HTML5

September 5, 2012

Emeryville, CA: MagicalTimeBean proudly presents Escape Goat in the browser, a fully-featured HTML5 port of the Xbox & PC game. Players can experience an authentic version of the game in a modern browser like Chrome or Firefox, no plugins required.

Here's what makes this special:

Linux and Mac users can play the game for the first time
Players can use the built-in level editor to create and share levels with a simple URL
Two user-created worlds featuring over 40 new rooms
In the spirit of spreading the joie de vivre of Escape Goat, the web version is now localized to French!

As a promotion, the full game will be available through Sunday, September 9. (After this, a demo version will remain, as will the ability to share custom levels.)

Escape Goat is the creation of Ian Stocker, through his indie game company MagicalTimeBean. Prior to Escape Goat, he released Soulcaster I & II for Xbox and PC. The HTML5 port was done by Kevin Gadd, who is currently building an open-source framework for porting XNA games to HTML5 (called JSIL). He worked previously as programmer/designer at ArenaNet on Guild Wars.

Escape Goat is available on Xbox Live Indie Games, Windows, and now the web at

This article was originally published on Joystiq.