Hackers claim to have developed Wii U mod chip, Nintendo aware and prepared

Hackers claim to have developed Wii U mod chip, Nintendo
A hacker group claims they have designed a modification chip that circumvents security measures on Nintendo's Wii U. In a post on the group's website – which Joystiq has decided against linking to – the modders say they have "completely reversed the Wii U drive authentication, disk encryption, file system, and everything else" needed for its most recent chip. The group had previously been known for developing a similar chip for the Nintendo Wii.

In the face of such claims, Nintendo has responded by maintaining the company is prepared to combat the most recent threat of piracy – a threat that plagues the video game industry. "Nintendo is aware that a hacking group claims to have compromised Wii U security; however, we have no reports of illegal Wii U games nor unauthorized applications playable on the system while in Wii U mode," the hardware manufacturer told CVG in a statement.

Nintendo says it continues to monitor any threats to its business and will take "the necessary legal steps to prevent the facilitation of piracy."

The development and distribution of mod chips is a murky legal issue, due to differences in international law. The website that houses the group behind the claim was registered in Australia, which previously ruled that the sale of mod chips are illegal.

Despite the claim, the group has released no evidence that a chip is functioning as described, nor that it actually exists.

This article was originally published on Joystiq.