ACLU sues over NSA's surveillance program, challenging its constitutionality

If you're already overwhelmed by the sheer amount of activity surrounding the ongoing NSA fallout, we're guessing that now would be an excellent time to go on vacation. Predictably, lawsuits are already being filed against the National Security Agency, the second of which is coming from the American Civil Liberties Union. Essentially, it's challenging the constitutionality of the surveillance program in a New York federal court, deeming the initiative "one of the largest surveillance efforts ever launched by a democratic government."

The suit claims that the program infringes upon (at least) the First Amendment and the Fourth Amendment of the United States constitution. As The Verge points out, the ACLU's prior NSA lawsuit (in 2008) was dismissed in a 5-4 outcome "on the grounds that it did not have legal standing to sue, since there was no way to prove it had been targeted." Given the leaked documents involved now, however, the outcome could be much different this go 'round. Of course, one has to wonder: if all of this leads to the public shutdown of the program, are we capable of trusting the same government that started it to not actually operate it in secret?

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The Daily Roundup for 06.11.2013