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At long last, Google Now will support third-party apps. That means that in addition to serving you helpful information like when your next appointment is and how long it'll take you to get to the airport, Google's predictive search app will now push data from third-party apps too. The list for supported third-party apps at launch is long -- almost 40 at current count -- and include notable apps such as Airbnb, Lyft, The Guardian and Pandora. The idea here is if you already have these apps on your phone, info from those will be pushed to cards in Google Now. So for example, Pandora will offer recommendations to you on your commute, or Airbnb will remind you of the place that you were searching for and ask you if you want to book it. It'll also work in concert with contextual information from the phone, so if you've just arrived at the airport, Lyft might ask you if you want a ride.

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The results from Uber's six-week-long external privacy audit, spurred on by several high profile security controversies, are in. And, surprisingly, the final report looks positively rosy for the on-demand taxi company . "Uber has dedicated significantly more resources to privacy than we have observed of other companies of its age, sector, and size," auditors from the law firm Hogan Lovells said in a statement. That's not exactly what you'd expect from a company that had one of its executives joke about tracking journalists' private lives using its internal data. Uber admits "we haven't always gotten it right" when it comes to security, and notes that it will continue to "review and iterate" on its policies as it continues to grow.

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If you missed out on the cult classic Indigo Prophecy (("Fahrenheit" in Europe), the first stab at a pseudo-cinematic game from Heavy Rain developer Quantic Dream, you've now got a good reason to give it a spin. A revamped version of the title has just landed on iOS and Steam (with support for Windows, Mac, and Linux) for $10, sporting better graphics and no censoring (nudity and sex scenes were cut from the original US import). While it's not the first game to combine a detective story with supernatural elements, Indigo Prophecy won plenty of praise for its mixture of interactive elements and movie-like style. That's something its director David Cage would later refine with Heavy Rain on the PlayStation 3 -- though the less said about his most recent title, Beyond: Two Souls, the better. An Android version of this shiny new version of Indigo Prophecy is in the works, but Aspyr Media, the developer handling the port, doesn't have a release date in mind yet.

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Yet another project is graduating from experiment to proper part of Google. Only two weeks ago, Glass left the confines of the Skunk Works-like Google X and became its own division headed up by Nest co-founder Tony Fadell. Now Project Tango, the 3D-sensing and -mapping concept, is moving on from the ATAP (Advanced Technology and Projects) labs to become a part of the company proper. Unfortunately what that means for the technology or what products it might eventually end up in isn't exactly clear. Will the next Nexus sport a depth-sensing IR camera? Maybe. Or perhaps they'll be used to build more advanced home automation and home monitoring tools for Nest. All we do know is that Tango will live on, even if the name "Project Tango" eventually fades away.

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Let's be honest: Kids are really easy to entertain. Give 'em something that makes noise and flashes some pretty colors and they're set. And that's pretty much what Vine does, ad infinitum. There's sounds, and sites and it loops forever or until the kid swipes down to the next clip. The only issue is, not everything on Vine is what you'd call "family friendly." Chances are you've got at least one foul-mouthed coworker that's always posting six-second barrages of profanity. So during a recent hack week, where employees work on pet projects, rather than focus on daily responsibilities, a few folks built Vine Kids.

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Living a wholly private life on the internet is getting to be impossible, but months of thinkpieces and public outcry finally seem to have done a little good where one company is concerned. According to the New York Times, Verizon Wireless is giving its customers the option to fully opt out of the quiet, advertiser-friendly web tracking it's been conducting for the better part of two years. Alas, there's no word yet on just when that change will take effect, though it can't come soon enough for the privacy advocates and concerned consumers that've been raising hell since the existence of so-called "supercookies" came to light.

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It may look like a Prius that's been vomited on by Mad Max, but the vehicle you see in the clip below is probably Tesla's long-delayed Model X SUV. You see, when companies begin stress-testing vehicles, they dress them down with a dodgy paint job and go riding out a deserted airfield, like the one at the old naval base in Alameda. No amount of weird paint, however, could disguise the latest all-electric vehicle to roll off the production line, especially one as long-awaited as the X.

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Soundcloud likes to keep its apps looking sharp -- this much we know. It was only just recently that the music service gave its iPhone app a bit of spit and polish. This time it's the iPad version's turn. Unsurprisingly, a lot of the design-DNA from the smaller iOS app carries over to the tablet version, but it comes with some functional tweaks too. The music-player's waveform isn't just simplistic, it's functional (touch to play, pause, skip etc). Also, you don't need an account to listen to tracks (you just ope, search and play) -- why don't all music apps work like that! It's not all give though: comments, track info and follower lists are all temporarily removed (they'll make a return at some point soon, we're told). As for the bigger picture, the update also proves Soundcloud is moving towards content delivery rather than enabling its creation (it's been a tool for independent musicians right from the start). How so? The removal of recording and uploading tools should fairly well make that clear.

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Microsoft has long been championing TV white space internet for use in places conventional types of connections don't reach, even in places that don't even have access to electricity. After a pilot program that brought white space broadband to some African universities, Redmond is now making it available to anyone in Ghana. The company has collaborated with local provider Spectra Wireless to launch what it claims is the "first commercial service network utilizing TV white spaces" in Africa. Now, people (specifically students) in Ghana can subscribe to affordable high-speed internet bundles and even internet-enabled devices, presumably phones, tablets and laptops.

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Asda

Before we start, we know that crime is wrong and that theft is a serious issue. That said, the lengths some people will go to steal a few DVDs is pretty entertaining. Thieves at a Walmart-owned ASDA supermarket in Cheshire, England managed to evade security after they began packing movies and other stolen goods into envelopes. Instead of walking out with the goods, where they'd be instantly apprehended, they came up with the clever idea to send the packages to themselves using the in-store Post Office. Apparently no one told them DVDs were dead.

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