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Tim Cook has big plans for his vast wealth: It's all going to philanthropy, he revealed in a Fortune interview. The Apple CEO -- who's currently worth around $112 million, and holds restricted stock that could be worth up to $665 million -- said he's already been making donations quietly, but he's also looking forward to taking a deeper approach to the whole endeavor. That could involve starting something similar to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Microsoft co-founder's non-profit which manages his philanthropic efforts. Cook also plans to cover his nephew's college education, like the rich uncle that he is. Cook's open approach to philanthropy differs from his predecessor Steve Jobs, who was widely criticized for not donating enough. His wife, Laurene Powell Jobs, revealed after his death that the family actually donated tens of millions anonymously for over two decades.

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Introducing Engadget's newest contributor: The Wirecutter!

Starting today, you're going to notice a very familiar contributor popping up on the pages of Engadget. That would be none other than our friends at The Wirecutter. We've long admired The Wirecutter's ability to review as many products in as many categories as it does, and then whittle its findings down to a few sensible picks. Here at Engadget, we review gadgets too, but we mainly stick to a handful of categories -- you know, phones, tablets, laptops, smartwatches, et cetera. Even then, there aren't nearly enough of us to test all the interesting stuff out there. That's where The Wirecutter comes in. Beginning today, we're going to be pulling in abridged versions of their reviews, particularly in categories Engadget doesn't usually cover. Think: televisions, kitchen gadgets, touchscreen gloves. And in today's case, routers: the first column of theirs we'll be publishing. Check it out at the link below, and stay tuned for new picks next week!

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Live streaming apps like Twitter's Periscope and Meerkat are all the rage right now, but so far they've only been accessible to iPhone users. Enter Telescope, a third-party Periscope app for Windows Phone, which opens up the service's live streams to an entirely new audience. You can't actually broadcast your own streams from the app yet (the developer says it's coming), but you can sign up for Periscope and view other live feeds from within the app. It's not a complete solution, but it's something until Twitter rolls out an official Windows Phone client. Expect to wait a while though -- even Twitter's own microblogging app for Windows Phone is still miles behind its iPhone and Android entries. Both Twitter and Meerkat say they're also working on Android apps, but Telescope makes Windows Phone the first platform outside of iOS to get one of those live streaming apps.

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SSDs and other flash memory devices will soon get cheaper and larger thanks to big announcements from Toshiba and Intel. Both companies revealed new "3D NAND" memory chips that are stacked in layers to pack in more data, unlike single-plane chips currently used. Toshiba said that it's created the world's first 48-layer NAND, yielding a 16GB chip with boosted speeds and reliability. The Japanese company invented flash memory in the first place and has the smallest NAND cells in the world at 15nm. Toshiba is now giving manufacturers engineering samples, but products using the new chips won't arrive for another year or so.

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In North Korea, the gadget you'd probably want is a Notel. Or a Notetel, a word that attempts to shoehorn notebook and television together, describing a pretty unassuming, very popular, Chinese-made media player. According to estimates from Reuters, up to half of all urban-based North Koreans have a Notel stashed somewhere in the house. Now, until recently, the device was only found on black markets, but the device has now been legalized and is apparently available in state-run shops and markets for just fifty bucks.

Image credit: Reuters, Kim Hong-Ji

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YouTube introduced videos that play at 60 frames per second last year and ones viewable in 4K resolution in February. Now, the website is starting to experiment with videos that are both silky smooth and ultra high-def. TechCrunch has spotted a low-key, semi-secret playlist comprised of only six videos that you can choose to play at 60 fps in 4K resolution -- just toggle the settings switch to see the option. You'll have to load YouTube on Chrome to see the 2160p60 4K setting under Quality. Plus, you'll need a device capable of displaying ultra HD (3840 × 2160 resolution) to enjoy the feature's benefits. Trust us when we say it's not worth the buffering time if your computer or TV isn't designed to handle 4K: the videos will look worse. We've embedded all six files below the fold, but feel free to visit the playlist itself to watch them all continuously.

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Activists Protest Outside Justice Dep't During Obama Speech On NSA Reforms

The US Congress, Senate and White House may be torn on what to do with a key Patriot Act spying clause, set to expire on June 1st. But Google, Apple, Facebook and other tech companies in the Reform Government Surveillance coalition know exactly what they want: no more bulk data collection. Together with numerous privacy groups including the ACLU and EFF, they presented a letter to the President and both houses with two key demands. The groups asked for "a clear, strong and effective end of bulk collection practices under the Patriot Act," along with "transparency and accountability mechanisms for both government and company reporting."

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The phone in these images looks like the LG G3, but you might notice some subtle differences. That's because it could actually be pictures of the brand's yet-to-be-released flagship, the G4. An XDA Developer user called s3rv1cet3ch posted a folder of images on the forum, explicitly calling it the G4 Note. The user also pointed out that it has stylus on the top left corner, but if this is the Korean version of the device, that could very well be a TV antenna. After all, G3's Korean version has an antenna you can pull out on that exact spot.

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When Rice University chemist Matteo Pasquali set out to to create strong and conductive carbon nanotube fibers, he had aerospace applications in mind. But it turned out his microscopic fibers are also great at communicating with the brain, making them an ideal candidate for therapies that deal with neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Pasquali said: "...once we [he and his team] had them in our hand, we realized that they had an unexpected property: They are really soft, much like a thread of silk. Their unique combination of strength, conductivity and softness makes them ideal for interfacing with the electrical function of the human body."

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When your location marker on Google Maps is pinging all over the place, it's usually due to temperamental GPS signal. DARPA thinks this isn't cutting it anymore, and is developing a "radically" new tech that will offer real-time position tracking -- something that'll work despite blind spots or jamming efforts. DARPA expects this will offer a huge boon to the US Military over, well, everyone else. Beyond war, the new location tech will be good for some much more, and will be far more flexible than GPS. Just like how we now use that once-military network for navigation and location services, new tech is very likely drip down to muggles like us too.

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