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This week it's all about the big game. We will not mention the footballs and how much air is or is in them, we will only wish for a contest that's not already over by halftime. Other than the Super Bowl matchup of the Seahawks and Patriots, we're also looking forward to Anderson Silva's return to UFC fighting, and the release of Grim Fandango Remastered on PlayStation and PC platforms. Finally, don't miss D'Angelo as a musical guest on Saturday Night Live. Look after the break to check out each day's highlights, including trailers and let us know what you think (or what we missed).

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It's been a few months since Google launched its YouTube Music Key service, and now we may be finding out how it plans to keep the digital shelves stocked. Musician Zoë Keating blogged last week complaining that YouTube threatened to block her music -- she plays "the cello and the computer" sampling her own sounds as part of the performance -- from streaming unless she signed a 5-year agreement licensing her work for the new service, among other changes. So what's going on? (Other than the usual explanation.) According to Keating, she uses ContentID to track and, if she chooses to, get paid when someone uses her music in their videos. The new contract Google is offering is all-encompassing when it comes to monetization, so to keep ContentID her music will be included in both the free and premium services, the entire catalog will have ads on it, and new music is required to come to YouTube at the same time it arrives anywhere else.

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Google is catching some heat from WikiLeaks after the company revealed that it handed over emails and other data on three WikiLeaks employees to the US government. Obviously, that in and of itself would be enough to ruffle the feathers of the activist group. But, to make matters worse, Mountain View handed handed over the data in the spring of 2012. That's right, Google waited over two and a half years to tell Wikileaks about the government request. The warrants, which were served by the FBI in March of 2012, asked for the contents of all emails -- sent, received and draft -- as well as their destination or origin, IP addresses and even the credit cards associated with the accounts. How much of that information Google ultimately delivered is not known, but WikiLeaks has asked the internet giant for some insight.

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Dropcam Pro

Normally, companies don't do much for you when they stop supporting a device. They'll give you a too-bad-so-sad notice and ask you to buy their latest gear. Not Dropcam, however. The Nest-owned company is ditching support for both its original home security camera and the Echo on April 15th, but it's also launching a replacement program that will get you a free Dropcam HD if you own one of the older models. You'll have to switch to a new subscription plan if you want the cam to be useful for cloud video recording, but there otherwise aren't any strings attached -- Dropcam will maintain legacy service for free until the cutoff date, and refund the difference if you've paid for a yearly plan. This isn't really an altruistic gesture (the company makes at least $99 per year from your subscription), but it'll at least take some of the pain out of switching to newer technology.

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Microsoft's Surface Pro 3

Microsoft appears to be well past the days when it was writing off unsold Surface tablets and struggling to match Sony in game console sales. The Windows developer reports that its Devices and Consumer group's revenue grew 8 percent year over year in the last calendar quarter of 2014, thanks in no small part to healthy Surface and Xbox sales. It's not revealing shipment numbers for the Surface, but it notes that revenue for the slate computers shot up 24 percent versus a year earlier, thanks in no small part to the Surface Pro 3.

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Waze showing police on a Moto X

You may use Google's Waze app primarily to avoid traffic jams and watch out for speed cameras, but some American police see it as threat -- and they want Google to do something about it. Officers speaking to the Associated Press believe that Waze's police finding feature, which is mainly meant to warn about speed traps, makes it too easy for would-be cop killers to find targets. These critics hope to muster support from law enforcement groups and push Google into disabling the feature so that it's not relatively trivial to "stalk" uniformed people from a phone.

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As a winter storm starts to drop several inches of snow on the northeast United States, Amazon's advising Prime Now customers in New York City not to rely on its one-hour deliveries. The service started dropping off orders around Manhattan in mid-December, and the online retailer is already seeing a rise in demand as weather conditions get worse. "We're watching the storm also, and will be operating on a limited schedule," Amazon spokeswoman Kelly Cheeseman told Bloomberg. "Customers can get updates through the Prime Now app on delivery availability." So if you're looking to restock a few "everyday essentials," you may want to make other arrangements.

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Have you ever wondered if a regular human could carry the health packs, guns, chainsaw and all the other stuff from Doom? Well, it looks like we're about to find out. The disproving duo of Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman tackle scenarios from that title this weekend (January 31st at 9 PM ET) on a special video games episode of MythBusters. With the help of id Software creative director Tim Willits, the team recreated a level of Doom to see what's what when it comes to human strength in first-person shooters. If you're familiar with the show, you know that a couple of myths are typically addressed in a single episode, so perhaps we'll get a Call of Duty or Gears of War segment, too. For now, a trailer for Saturday's installment resides after the break.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg At Internet.org Summit In Delhi

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been hard at work connecting the world with not only his social network, but with basic internet access, too. In another step towards doing so in developing areas, the folks in Menlo Park are rolling out Facebook Lite: a version of its Android app that's meant to use less data and work well regardless of network speeds. In fact, it's specifically designed for browsing on 2G networks and in locales where connectivity is extremely limited. At less than 1MB, the software makes for a quick install to wrangle messaging, status updates, and other core features that Facebook users employ. According to TechCrunch, Facebook Lite is in the testing phase, and it's only available in Bangladesh, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, Sudan, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Zimbabwe for the time being. However, the app requires Android 2.2, making it an option for most users -- even those wielding low-end devices.

[Photo credit: Arun Sharma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images]

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Free stuff is always great, especially if people actually want what's on offer. Apple now has a special section called "Free on iTunes" where you can find TV shows and music freebies if you've already blown through your monthly entertainment budget. It features TV episodes from 12 Monkeys, Eye Candy and others, as well as music from bands like Purity Ring and Houndmouth. As 9to5 Mac points out, Apple offered a similar service before, but this time, the focus seems to be less on hits and more on material that's still looking for an audience.

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