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Technology is pretty awesome. Google is prepared to take the stage in San Francisco for the I/O Conference keynote presentation, with executives ready to talk about the company's latest wares -- and you can watch it all from the comfort of your own screen. Even if you're in San Francisco, we suggest beating the traffic and watching the presentation without moving an inch (except to grab your coffee, of course). The keynote begins at 12:30PM ET / 9:30PM PT, and you can watch it via the live stream below.

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NASA is on track to bring human spaceflight back to the US. The agency has ordered its first "crew rotation" mission from Boeing, which will involve ferrying astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS). NASA says it expects to make a similar order with Elon Musk's SpaceX later this year -- afterwards, it will decide which of the two companies to green-light for the first mission in late 2017. However, this milestone moment in US spaceflight could easily shift. For one, Boeing and SpaceX still need to complete NASA's certification process before they can undertake any missions. For another, NASA's Commercial Crew Program is dependent on adequate funding through 2016 and beyond. If it comes up short, the agency says it "will have to delay future milestones for both partners proportionally and extend sole reliance on Russia." We're keeping our fingers crossed.

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Within the next seven months, NASA will subject the InSight lander to a series of tests to ensure it can survive a grueling trip to the red planet. Before it lifts off in March 2016, it will have to undergo two thermal vacuum tests, which will expose it to extreme temperatures and atmospheric pressures that it will experience on Mars. For the first one, it will be in "cruise configuration" -- wherein the lander is tucked inside an aeroshell capsule -- a form it will assume during its six-month trip to its destination. The lander will also be tested for electronic interference between its various parts, as well as for its ability to endure vibrations that simulate a rocket launch.

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For one to rise, others must fall. Hawaii's governor David Ige has given his blessing to the controversial Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) that scientists want to build on the Mauna Kea mountain. But there's a catch -- in return, he wants "at least 25 percent" of the existing telescopes to be torn down. At the moment, there are 13 telescopes on the mountainside and only one is scheduled to be dismantled. Under Ige's new proposals, one facility would need to enter the decommissioning process later this year, and the remainder in his 25 percent quota would be gone before the TMT is operational in the mid-2020s.

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Microsoft's already demonstrated how its computer vision technology can recognize objects even better than humans, now it's onto the next frontier: Interpreting elements of a photo and automatically generating captions. That may not exactly sound exciting, but being able to accurately explain an image could be essential for artificial intelligence. It's also yet another sign of the power of neural networks, or computer models that try to mimic the way the human brain works. Microsoft's technology starts by identifying everything in an image, then it generates sentences around how those objects interact. For example, in the image above it came up with "A purple camera with a woman"; "A woman holding a camera in a crowd"; and "A woman holding a cat." Two of those sentences don't make much sense -- it somehow identifies a bundle of hair as a cat -- so it eventually settled on "A woman holding a camera in a crowd" as the best way to describe the scene.

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Ford Logo

One of the biggest issues in the automotive industry is that when car makers come up with an innovative new technology, it can take years for others to catch up. Tesla made a positive change when it opened its patents to further the adoption of electric cars, and now Ford is getting in on the act too. The company announced today that it will make at least 650 patents "dedicated to electrified vehicle technologies" available to other car makers, but unlike Tesla, is asking for an undisclosed fee. Ford already has six hybrid or all-electric models available to buy, but seems intent on increasing that number with a little help from its new facility located near Henry Ford's original labs in Dearborn. It intends to hire another 200 electrified vehicle engineers at Ford Engineering Laboratories this year, allowing it to "solve bigger challenges and help improve the industry." Now all we need is for Toyota and co. to follow suit.

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If you're entitled to play a sport in real life, then it's only fair that you can do so from the comfort of your couch. That's why it's good to see EA Sports announce that FIFA 16 will feature women's soccer teams for the first time. Now, users will be able to play as one of 12 international teams that include the USA, England, Brazil and France. It's a big step, too, since while you can get a licensed WNBA title from 2K Games, this is the first time EA has included a women's roster in one of its team-based games. In fact, the only woman we remember appearing in one of these games up to this point is Ronda Rousey in the UFC spin-off title.

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Lego Worlds

Lego's new Amiibo-like Dimensions figures haven't even hit stores yet, but already the company appears to be taking on another gaming phenomenon: Minecraft. The world's biggest toy brand has begun including small flyers inside some of its sets advertising a new game called Lego Worlds, inviting players to "Explore. Discover. Create." Sounds exactly like the premise of Mojang's popular sandbox game, doesn't it? Lego may have gotten a little ahead of itself as the dedicated website for Worlds has yet to go live, but something tells us we might learn more about this mysterious title when E3 comes around next month.

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Robots are getting pretty good at carrying on after taking a knock, but what if they lose a limb? Scientists from the US and France have given a six-legged 'bot the smarts to keep going even if two of its legs are disabled by, say, a Sarah Connor shotgun blast. The team created and then rated a number of simulations for how its robot could keep moving forward despite losing a leg or two. Once that information was programmed into the robot, it was able to rapidly evaluate the options and use the one that worked best in the real world.

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Amazon box

Amazon can get you a package in an hour, but if you "only" need it the same day, delivery is now free in 14 metropolitan areas. To get the service, you'll need to place an order of $35 or more and be an Amazon Prime subscriber at $99 per year. You'll also need to be in specific urban centers, including San Francisco, New York City, Los Angeles, Boston and Seattle/Tacoma (check your zip code here). The move is yet another carrot for Prime subscribers and probably a blow to brick-and-mortar stores, who now rely a lot on impatient shoppers.

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