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At some point in life, you may have wondered: would you prefer dating an anime character instead of an actual human being? If you're unsure, ROHM's here to help. At CEATEC, the component maker paired up with TECHMAC to show off a dating game featuring a "Tokimeki Sensor" -- "tokimeki" is a Japanese word for "palpitation" that's often associated with dating simulators. The player places his or her hand on a board, with the index fingers placed on an optical palpitation sensor on the back. The subject then faces a flirty anime boy or girl on the left screen for about a minute, followed by its human counterpart on the right, and then the game will determine whether you're into 2D romance instead of 3D. We didn't dare to face the truth, because you know, the heart never lies, but our friend Tim Stevens wasn't so sure about this machine's accuracy.

Apple has removed several ad-blocking apps from its Store that created a risk of "man-in-the-middle" security breaches. While Apple now permits ad-blockers for Safari, the banned apps also block ads from native apps by installing their own "root certificates" and shunting all traffic through a VPN. From there, they read the unencrypted traffic and remove ads, provided you enable the feature. As spotted by Techcrunch, one of the apps Apple removed was "Been Choice," software that even removed ads from Apple's own News app. However, it was also gathering "behavioral data" and sharing it with other companies, offering users points and cash rewards in exchange.

The dedicated Facebook Messenger app Apple promised for its wearable's latest operating system, the watchOS 2, is finally here. So long as you've already installed the updated platform, you can start using third-party apps on your Apple Watch, including the social network's messaging application. Since the watchface is too small to type on, the app lets you send and receive voice clips, stickers, Likes and emojis -- abbreviated interactions that suit a tiny display. Facebook also upgraded the app to show your Messenger contacts and conversations via spotlight search on iOS 9 and to work with the iPad's multi-tasking capabilities.

Must Reads

  • Adidas Futurecraft 3D: A running shoe made with 3D-printed materials

    While Kanye West is worried about people 3D-printing shoes at home, his contractor Adidas believes the technology will play a major role in the future of footwear. (West designs the Yeezy shoe and clothing line for the Three-Stripes brand.) To show this, Adidas today introduced Futurecraft 3D, a running...

  • These 8K displays may end up on your next tablet

    Most of us have barely touched 4K content, but the keen folks in Japan are already showing off some 8K displays, and we're not just talking about those of conventional TV sizes. At CEATEC, NHK brought along three upcoming 8K panels that may end up on future tablets, laptops and monitors. These include...

Los Angeles police car

The state of California passed the "Leno bill" that would keep your private digital info, well, private from law enforcement in June. Now, governor Jerry Brown has signed it into law. The California Electronic Communications Privacy Act, co-authored by senator Mark Leno, will protect the Golden State's residents against warrantless surveillance of their digital data, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. Perhaps surprisingly, California's law enforcement officials were among the bill's biggest supporters. The ACLU says that "major" state law enforcement groups pulled opposition of it and that cops were apparently happy to support SB 178 because it's "in the best interest of all citizens of California."

Elon Musk, Tesla Factory, Fremont (CA, USA)

During an interview with German business newspaper Handelsblatt on Thursday, Elon Musk unleashed some very CE-Oh No He Didn't!-worthy words about Apple's car efforts. "They have hired people we've fired," he responded when asked if he was worried about a new competitor that's been snapping up former Tesla engineers. He even revealed that they (he and his friends from the auto company, presumably) jokingly call Apple the Tesla Graveyard. "If you don't make it at Tesla, you go work at Apple," he added and made it a point to clarify that he wasn't kidding with that one.

A lot of people have been tinting their social media profile pics in purple every mid-October for the past five years as a way to support the LGBT youth and to take a stand against bullying. One easy way to do that is to use the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation's (GLAAD) "Go Purple for #SpiritDay" app, which it has just refreshed ahead of this year's event on the 15th. In addition to generating purple profile pics, the app has a direct donation link to GLAAD, as well as new anti-bullying resources and sharing options. It's now available for download from both iTunes and Google Play devices -- just note that you'd have to watch a video ad from its sponsor (Toyota Financial Services) when you first fire it up.

Tired of being shuttled about like a sack of potatoes by your current electric getaround? Want to at least pretend that you're getting a workout while scooting to the supermarket? Then you're going to want to take a magic tricycle ride aboard the Liberty Trike. This power-assist three-wheeler, which is currently in the midst of an already-funded Indiegogo campaign, will retail for roughly $2,000 when it's expected to hits the streets next October.

In April MakerBot laid off 20 percent of its workforce. Roughly six months later, it's doing it again, trimming another fifth of its payroll as it struggles to meet lofty ambitions and expectations set by its parent company Stratasys. In a blog post announcing the layoffs and a significant restructuring CEO Jonathan Jaglom said that MakerBot needs to "get back to our entrepreneurial spirit and address our fractured organizational structure." As one of the pioneers of the consumer 3D printing scene MakerBot grew quickly, but the market has stagnated and the company hasn't been able to maintain the same level of growth.

APTOPIX Microsoft Windows 10

Microsoft has already said its mixed reality headset, HoloLens, will be reaching developers early next year. But while we wait for that to happen, the company plans to take it on tour across the US and Canada, in an event that's going to give developers the chance to try the device firsthand. They'll also be able to meet members of the HoloLens team and learn how to create holographic experiences, which is a smart way to lure in any dev who's thinking about paying the $3,000 for a test unit. The live demo trip begins October 13th in Seattle, followed by Toronto, Salt Lake City, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Atlanta and, lastly, Austin. To register, as well as find out the exact dates for each city, check out the event's dedicated site.

VW America CEO Testifies At House Hearing On Emissions Cheating Scandal

If you're one of the 11 million owners of a Volkswagen car that's part of the company's huge emissions cheating scandal, you might be getting some compensation for the vehicle's lost value. As reported by ABC News, Volkswagen US CEO Michael Horn (pictured above) testified today in front of a congressional subcommittee and said that the company might pay the owners of affected cars as a way to make up for the fact that resale value for those vehicles (and indeed pretty much any VW out there) is going to drop. However, Horn said that Volkswagen wouldn't be refunding customers money. The company also isn't planning to provide loaner cars for owners, as the affected vehicles are still safe to drive (even though they're releasing up to 40 times more than the EPA's acceptable standard).


There is very little love lost between car-platform rivals Lyft and Uber. Nowhere is that more apparent than in a Reuters' article about anonymous sources pointing fingers at Lyft's technology chief Chris Lambert as the probable cause of an Uber hack. According to the report, after a massive breach of driver information back in February, Uber launched an investigation to determine who got into its system. That led it to court to determine who was behind a Comcast IP address that had accessed the security key the ride-sharing company accidentally left on GitHub. Even though the filing draws no connection to the actual hack (which according to Reuters sources was routed through a Scandinavian VPN) the court ruled that the information was "reasonably likely" to help the company find the person (or persons) involved in the breach.

HBO Latino: El Negocio - Private Dinner

HBO's Go on-demand streaming service is set to launch in Latin America and the Caribbean as a standalone subscription product, the network revealed today. While HBO Go has been available in these areas for pay-TV subscribers, cord-cutters will soon be able to enjoy too -- but with some added benefits. The service is expected to be similar to HBO Now, which is only available in the US, offering access to both live TV as well VOD content. HBO says it plans to rollout the service in Spanish-speaking markets across Latin America and the Caribbean, plus Brazil (Portuguese), by the end of this year. First up: Colombia, with more to follow thereafter.

Last night Engadget brought you a sneak peek at Facebook's new "Reactions" feature, and today the social network confirmed it's now in testing. Instead of the often-requested "dislike" to counter the existing Like button, founder Mark Zuckerberg explains (in a video embedded after the break) that this idea is just about giving more options to express yourself. Whether or not the feelings of love, sadness and empathy are what you're trying to project, the test is currently limited to users in Ireland and Spain. If you are there (or use a browser proxy service like Hola to fake it) you'll see something like the picture above, after long pressing the Like button on the website or mobile apps. Depending on how things go, this could roll out to the rest of the billion or so Facebook users soon, but it looks like any official support for dislike is never going to be in the plans.


In a sign that Apple Pay is gaining traction with even more retailers, VP of Apple Pay Jennifer Bailey has just announced on stage at Code/Mobile a plan to roll out Apple Pay in Starbucks, KFC and Chili's locations across the country. You can expect to see Apple Pay in a few pilot Starbucks outlets later this year, with a larger roll out in 2016. Apple Pay in KFC should start early next year, while Chili's is expected to implement a unique pay-at-the-table mobile payment solution.

Move over Mars, NASA's just confirmed that Pluto, everybody's favorite Kuiper belt object/celestial punching bag, not only has expansive fields of water ice on its surface but blue skies as well. Granted Pluto has neither the thick atmosphere nor global oceans that the Earth does, so the "blue sky" NASA's New Horizon's team spotted last week is actually more of a haze. And, technically, the haze particles themselves would likely appear either red or grey to the naked eye. However, the fact that they appear blue from this distance tells NASA a lot.

Uncharted: The Nathan Drake Collection™_20151008041723

PlayStation doesn't have an official mascot character, but if it did, developer Naughty Dog's Nathan Drake would probably fit the bill. Much like Microsoft did last year with Halo: The Master Chief Collection to get fans ready for Halo 5: Guardians on Xbox One, Sony's gone back and revamped the three main Uncharted games and put them into Uncharted: The Nathan Drake Collection to prep folks for next spring's Uncharted 4: A Thief's End on PlayStation 4. How do the eight, six and four year old games hold up? And was the remastering really necessary? Tune in on this post, (if you'd like to join us in chat) or the Engadget Gaming homepage at 6pm Eastern / 3pm Pacific as myself and Sean Buckley find out.

A few days ago, it was revealed that the A9 chip in Apple's new iPhone 6s is manufactured by two different companies, Samsung and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co (TSMC). More notably, reports started circulating that the battery life in the Samsung A9 devices was notably worse than that of the TSMC iPhones. Some tests have revealed that the TSMC chips last as much as two hours longer than the phones with Samsung silicon inside. Now, Apple has issued an official response that downplays the difference as only a matter of a few percentage points.

Sony America announced on Thursday that the wait for its PS4 universal remote is nearly over. The much-anticipated accessory is set to go on sale for $30 "later this month," according to a company post. The remote will serve to replace the DualShock controller for non-gaming applications. It will communicate via a Bluetooth connection and be able to control up to three additional AV devices. What's more, it will also be compatible with a number of existing streaming apps including Crunchyroll, HBO Go, Netflix (obvs), Twitch and YouTube. If you can't wait to purchase it in person when it actually hits store shelves, Amazon, Best Buy, Gamestop and Toys R Us all have it available for pre-order.

Adobe's Lightroom mobile apps were already free to download. However, the software still required a Creative Cloud login or for you to own the desktop version to get any real use out of it. Well, that's not the case anymore. Adobe nixed the membership requirement for Lightroom on iOS this week, and it'll soon to the same for the Android version that debuted earlier this year. Now that the photo-editing app is really free to use on your phone or tablet, you're free to add it to your photo-editing arsenal. There's a smattering of new features as well, including a Dehaze filter to improve photo quality, Targeted Adjustment tool for focused tweaks, an in-app camera for snapshots and more. As we previously reported, you can also select photos for retouching in Photoshop Fix before easily returning to Lightroom thanks to the newfangled Creative Sync technology. New versions of both Lightroom mobile for iPhone and iPad are available in iTunes now.

The Wirecutter's best deals: a Vizio 4K TV, the UE Roll, and more!

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You may have already seen Engadget posting reviews from our friends at The Wirecutter. Now, from time to time, we'll also be publishing their recommended deals on some of their top picks. Read on, and strike while the iron is hot -- some of these sales could expire mighty soon.