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At its heart, Twitter seems to be suffering from some sort of existential crisis, struggling to work out if it's a social network, a messaging service or a publishing platform. Today sees the company launch two features that, if we're honest, only really tick the second and third items on that list. Starting from now, you see, users can host group direct messages with those in your social circle that can only be seen as a broadside on services like WhatsApp. The other big feature, meanwhile, is that Twitter's mobile apps will now let you record, edit and share 30-second videos straight to your timeline.

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Is 2015 the year that we start rolling back the progress of the last 20 years? In addition to dressing like extras from The Facts of Life, we've started buying Vinyl again and people are even discovering the "joys" of instant photography. In fact, it's not just Polaroid that's getting back in on the act, either, since French startup Prynt is hoping to sell you a smartphone case with a built-in photo printer.

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For those who can't commit to a $1,000 mattress (a lot of people, most likely) even if it is high-tech, this much cheaper smart mattress cover called Luna might be the better choice. It's embedded with sensors to detect breathing and heart rate, accelerometers to track sleep patterns and microphones to hear your snoring. The cover then sends data to an Android or iOS app and adjusts temperatures accordingly, depending on your preference. Yep, it heats up or cools down to make you feel comfortable, and it can supposedly even maintain different temperatures on each side of the bed.

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At first glance, a pair of Glow headphones might seem like gimmicky glow-in-the-dark earbuds that are designed to get your attention and not much else. But look a little closer and you'll find something a whole lot more interesting: Glow purports to be the "world's first" pair of smart headphones embedded with laser light. Yep, that TRON-like glow from the cable emanates from something called Fibrance, a special light diffusing fiber from the folks over at Corning -- you know, the same folks who make that Gorilla Glass stuff. As for what makes it so "smart"? Well, the colored light of the cable isn't static -- it actually pulsates to the beat of the music. And, if all of Glow's Kickstarter goals are met, even to the beat of your heart.

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If there's one thing that America loves more than Netflix, it's movies where Adam Sandler sits around in loungewear cracking wise with Kevin James. It was back in October that the streaming company decided to give the public what it needed, teaming up with the actor's production company to knock out four original movies. Now, just a few months later, The Wrap has learned the details about the first to roll off the production line.

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Moments before Oculus Story Studio's new virtual reality short Lost reached its satisfying climax, I found myself in a compromised position. Sequestered in a private demo booth, I was involuntarily crouched down, covering my head in a defensive position and, I should add, squealing with delight. Lost, the first computer-animated work to come from Oculus VR's new film-innovation lab, is unlike any form of interactive entertainment I've ever experienced. And it succeeds in one very crucial respect: It's endearing.

"I want to create emotions that are very appealing," says Story Studio's Supervising Technical Director Max Planck. "I want you to come out of virtual reality and have a smile. Or [experience] something very touching emotionally, just like Pixar films do."

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While law enforcement has been using license plate readers to track vehicles for a while, they never formed into a unified network. In fact, the Department of Homeland Security posited a 29-page document about a vehicle-tracking network, but the idea didn't go any further. Until now, that is. The Justice Department has apparently crafted a nationwide database to track vehicle movement across states. While the main aim of license plate tracking is to assist the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in seizing cars and other assets while tackling drug trafficking, according to a government document seen by the WSJ, this will expand to encompass the search for vehicles that have been associated with other crimes, including killings and rape cases.

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The UK is 100 days away from one of the most contentious general elections in a generation, but locals shouldn't expect to be visited by a door-to-door campaigner. Instead, Britons that also have a Twitter account are going to find that their social feed has been taken over by political campaigners. In a pitch both to advertisers and politicians, Twitter's Gordon MacMillan boasts that the service's location information is now so precise, it can target voters in individual postcodes. Anyone, therefore, who lives in an area that's likely to decide the fate of the election will find no respite by staring into their smartphone.

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LG G3 battery

Scientists have spent a lot of time trying to lengthen battery life, but safety and thickness matter, too. Just ask Boeing about that first problem -- its 787 Dreamliner was grounded for months thanks to battery fires. However, a group of University of Michigan researchers may have found a way to make lithium-ion energy packs that are safer and slimmer at the same time. The team has developed Kevlar-based, nano-sized membranes that insulate the electrodes in a battery while still allowing lithium ions to pass through and create a proper circuit. The extra-thin layers should not only reduce the chances of short circuiting, but allow for more energy in a given space. You could get away with thinner batteries in smartwatches and other devices without giving up battery life... or worrying that your device will spontaneously combust, for that matter.

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If you've been experiencing random disconnection with your Xbox One's controller, there may be relief in site, according to a Major Nelson blog post. The latest preview features a controller update that's supposed to fix "(stability) issues submitted by customers and preview participants." We're not sure if that means it specifically addresses the disconnection problem, but we've asked Microsoft for more info. Meanwhile, the controller will also connect to the Xbox in around two seconds now instead of five, a boon only to the truly impatient. Preview members can get the fix by downloading the console update, then connecting their controller to the console with a USB cable and following the instructions here.

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