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It's true: Shazam's adding more useful features to its application, as was reported by Reuters back in March. Now, the famed discovery software can identify more than music, movies, TV shows and commercials, which has been the core functionality to date. With this new version, introduced today, Shazam is capable of recognizing packaged goods (like a Blu-ray or themed toys), books and magazines, as well as other merchandise that's typically available at physical retail stores. To use it, the only thing you have to do is open the app on your iPhone/Android smartphone, fire up the camera and, lastly, point it toward a compatible item's Shazam-printed logo or QR code.

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You know those goo.gl shortcuts you regularly come across on Twitter or Facebook and other places online? They now open the exact pages they link to either on the website's official app or on your browsers. For instance, if you click on a shortcut that links to a Google Maps page showing how to go from San Francisco to LA by land, it will automatically launch the navigation app if it's installed and load those step-by-step directions. If you haven't downloaded the app to your device, it will launch a browser instead. This change affects both new and old goo.gl shortcuts, so long as the website or app developer took steps to set up App Indexing for Android and iOS. Yup, that means the new feature works on both iOS and Android devices, and you can try it out for yourself right here: https://goo.gl/BpMdqp

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Xbox One controller diagram

Even though the Xbox One controller has earned many plaudits, one thing universally hated is the lack of a headphone port. So far the best solution has been to buy the $24.99 Xbox One Stereo Headset Adapter, but even that's not without its problems. Although it won't be much consolation to gamers that already bought the adapter, Microsoft is going to release a refreshed controller this June with a 3.5mm port built in.

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LONDON - OCT 4: Apple store logo on a store exterior in central London as the US technology giant launches the new iPhone 5 in t

The Apple Store app now offers same-day delivery service through Postmates, the same company bringing Big Macs to New York City homes and Starbucks coffee to households and offices in several US cities. To be clear, the two companies have been working together long before this, and you can actually order Apple products from Postmates' iOS app if you live in one of the many locations where the company operates. This new on-demand delivery option, however, is available only to San Francisco Bay Area residents willing to pay a fee to get their items ASAP.

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Smartwatches, you know the drill: a touchscreen display, and it feeds you notifications and stuff. Pretty boring, right? Lenovo agrees, so has cooked up a "Magic View" concept to show things don't need to be this way. The problem Magic View solves is simple: the small displays inherent in watches. The answer? A small, second screen in the strap that initially appears cosmetic, until you hold it to your eye. Once you do, you'll see an image the company claims is 20 times larger than the watch's main display. Lenovo says it's using "optical reflection" to achieve this, and that the second display can be used for viewing maps, looking "around" images (using the accelerometer in the watch we gather) and even viewing videos -- should you be ok with holding your wrist to your eye to do so.

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It's no secret that Windows Store has serious issues not just with scammy apps, but also with spammy ones. Now, Microsoft is finally addressing that problem by introducing a stricter certification policy for new and existing apps that could clean its catalog enough to make browsing the store less painful. The new policy has four main points starting with eliminating apps with almost identical names and icons, those whose titles don't match up with their content, and those that aren't very useful or unique. Microsoft will also prune away applications considerably more expensive than similar ones in its category.

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Shomi on an iPhone

Canadian cable firms Rogers and Shaw have hogged the Shomi video service all to themselves during its testing phase, but they're loosening up now that they're nearly ready for prime time. The two have revealed that their answer to Netflix will be available to all Canadians this summer, not just the companies' internet and TV subscribers. As during the beta, you'll plunk down $9 CAD ($7 US) per month to get a mix of shows and (mostly older) movies, including Transparent and other series that are Amazon exclusives in the US. The service already works through Android, Apple TV, Chromecast and iOS devices, so you won't be hurting for places to watch.

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Smartphones with built-in projectors -- well, just the two from Samsung, really -- haven't exactly been a huge hit so far, but Lenovo thinks it's finally got the right use case for this combination: beaming a touchscreen or virtual keyboard onto your desk. Announced at the Lenovo Tech World conference today is the Smart Cast, the world's first smartphone with an integrated focus-free laser projector, as opposed to the DLP tech on existing pico projectors. In addition to the usual wall projection mode, there's a "surface mode" that requires twisting the projector cap at the top (to enable reflection), propping up the phone with its kickstand, and then you'll have a projected touchscreen -- be it a virtual piano, a virtual keyboard or even Fruit Ninja -- right in front of you. Alas, that's all the info we've got so far. Until we get to see the real thing, you can check out the demo video after the break to stay entertained.

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Hunting for extremely dim galaxies is especially difficult with single-lens telescopes. That's because, no matter how technologically advanced, the device's design cannot fully eliminate detail-obscuring scattered light from the resulting images. The University of Toronto's Dragonfly Telephoto Array, however, deftly avoids that issue. This array -- one of the smallest multi-lens astronomy telescopes in use today -- is comprised of 10 Canon 400mm f/2.8 L IS II USM telephoto lenses, each costing $10,000. What's more, each lens is coated in a unique subwavelength nanomaterial that drastically reduces light reflection within the optic. And, like its insect inspiration, the Dragonfly's ten eyes can work in concert with one another to further reduce unwanted illumination in the resulting image, bringing out otherwise unseen detail in cosmic structures. According to the University of Toronto spokesman Roberto Abraham, this $100,000 system is ten times as accurate as its nearest rival.

[Image Credit: U of Toronto]

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Today's cast-off gadgets are far more likely to end up in a landfill than they are being responsibly disposed of. In fact, 41.8 million tons of e-waste were scrapped last year alone. To combat this, a team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has invented a radically new kind of ecologically-friendly semiconductor chip made from wood. No, seriously.

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