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In no surprise to anyone, Google announced that its next version of Android will be called "M," the natural followup to Lollipop and its other edible mobile operating systems. We won't know for some time what the "M" will stand for and are really hoping it's not something lame like "Mobile." Our team came up with a few suggestions of what the sweet treat might be and invite you to guess which one you think will get the honors. If we got it wrong and you have another idea, tweet it to us (we're @engadget, natch).

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diabetic lancet device in hand  ...

Researchers are one step closer to reducing the effects of type-1 diabetes after developing a way to implant insulin-generating cells into the pancreas. According to publisher IOP, this method was previously unsuccessful, but has begun to work now that scientists can "3D-print" a structure to protect the cells. Previous attempts to implant these cells, called islets of Langerhans, have been unsuccessful because the body's immune system would attack them as soon as they were injected.

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We've seen 3D projections on basketball courts and arena floors before, but the NHL's Tampa Lightning just took the game up a notch. Before the team's Eastern Conference Finals game on Tuesday, it used the playing surface to project a "Bolts of Steel" (get it, lightning bolts) game simulation inspired by the Nintendo classic Blades of Steel. We surmise they opted for another name not just for copyright purposes, but because the franchise didn't exist until 1992. While the video you'll see after the break is a render/demo, a Deadspin reader caught the thing on tape during the pregame festivities, so you can have a look at was it was like for those in attendance. Perhaps if the Bolts advance to the Stanley Cup Finals, they'll let a couple of fans duke it out for some nachos.

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9th annual Southeast Venture Conference and Digital Summit Charlotte

Step inside the Madame Tussauds in San Francisco and you'll find waxworks of Barack Obama, Mark Zuckerberg and other American icons. Steve Jobs is also present, but for many Apple fans there's something amiss about his model. The problem? There's no Steve Wozniak standing alongside him. Following a public competition to decide the next "tech innovator" waxwork, Madame Tussauds has agreed to immortalize the Apple cofounder next to his friend and fellow tech visionary. Woz now needs to visit the museum and conduct a two to three hour sitting, during which 250 measurements will be taken to ensure his model is accurate. Sculpting should take three to four months, and when the finished article is unveiled in the fall, Woz will be there for a quick side-by-side comparison. "I can't wait to see my figure next to Jobs – it'll be just like old times," he says.

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Microsoft might have scaled back its ambitions for Kinect, but creative modders and developers are still finding ways to put the peripheral to good use. Conductor Ludovic Morlot used the device to control three "kinetic" instruments -- a robotic grand piano, 24-reedhorn sculpture and custom concert chimes -- as part of an intimate Seattle Symphony performance on May 1st. During the 22-minute composition, Morlot could start, stop and control the volume of the instruments with gestures. Making a fist in different places let him select the unusual instruments, while waving the other hand up and down would change the amplification. The system was devised by Trimpin, a kinectic sculptor, sound artist and musician, and will remain in the Benaroya Hall so that visitors can try it for themselves. Microsoft seems to have given up on its second-gen Kinect, but mods like this are a reminder of its untapped potential. Between this concert, a weird musical sandbox and a Nine Inch Nails festival tour, it seems to have a small future in the music industry.

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Didn't fancy sitting through the whole liveblog from this year's Google I/O keynote? We understand. Sometimes you just want to catch the key plays via the post-game show. And that's kinda why Engadget exists, after all. As always with Google's big developer event, there was a lot of ground covered in a relatively short space of time. Fear not, below are the things we think you most need to know.

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For Android TV, 2015 could turn out to be a breakout year -- at least that's what Google hopes. But how does the search giant plan to reach those heights? One way is by expanding its home entertainment platform's support for live TV programming, with a new feature called Android Channels. What this lets users to do is view video-streaming apps on the same program guide as traditional channels, including those from ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC and other broadcast networks. If you're familiar with the Xbox One, you'd know that Microsoft's console offers similar functionality.

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If you like playing online games, then you too can help birth some (possibly sinister) software from DARPA. The US Army's slightly insane research division launched its Verigames web portal in late 2013 with five free online games designed to crowdsource coding. How? Like a similar effort that folded AIDS proteins, the games "translate players' actions into program annotations," to kill numerous bugs in systems code, according to DARPA. The first experiment was a success and "produced hundreds of thousands of (code) annotations," so the agency plans to expand the program with five new games.

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Last month, Acer teased a trio of new wearables in New York City. Today it's making them official. Enter the Liquid Leap Active, Leap Curve and Leap Fit, all designed with fitness, activity tracking and removable bands in mind. The Fit is the only one with a heart rate sensor, though, while the Curve and Active focus on offering features such as a curved display and sleep pattern-monitoring, respectively. Acer's staying mum on pricing and availability right now, but the company did say we'll learn those details at Computex 2015 next week. In the meantime, at least there's some eye candy to hold you over until then.

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A taste of something great: five days with NVIDIA's Shield Android TV

I wanted to watch The West Wing, so I asked for it. I wanted to play Asphalt 8 on my TV, so I downloaded it. I wanted people to see me playing a copy of Street Fighter X Tekken I didn't (strictly speaking) own, so I broadcasted it. All of these little interactions -- some mundane, some seemingly strange -- are what make using NVIDIA's Shield Android TV box such a tantalizing experience. At its very core, it's not all that different from the Nexus Player we saw last year, with an added veneer of NVIDIA gamer-friendliness. It's that extra dose of ambition, though, that makes the Shield the most interesting Android TV box you'll find out there right now. I've had the thing hooked up to my TV for five days and haven't completely put it through its paces yet, but read on for a taste of what it's like having a Shield-powered living room.

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