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An update to Elcomsoft's Phone Breaker software now makes it easier for good or bad guys to bypass Apple's vaunted new two-factor authentication to steal your iCloud stuff. As before, the hackers would need some information to start with -- either your Apple ID/password plus a two-factor code, or a digital token stolen from, say, your laptop. That would give them access to your account anyway, but here's the kicker: The Phone Breaker app can then create a digital token granting intruders permanent access without a two-step code until you change the password. It also allows someone to view all your iCloud files at a glance, making it easier to pick and choose which to steal. The tool is used legitimately by law enforcement to access lawbreakers' phones, but was also recently implicated in a celebrity phone hack.

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Here's one other DARPA-funded robotic limb controlled by thoughts alone -- actually make that two, because Colorado man Les Baugh had two bionic arms attached from shoulder level. Baugh got them this summer, 40 years after losing both arms, as part of a Revolutionizing Prosthetics Program test run at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. The project's researchers have been developing these Modular Prosthetic Limbs (MPL) over the past decade, but they say Baugh is the "first bilateral shoulder-level amputee" to wear two MPLs at the same time. Unlike Jan Scheuermann who controlled a robotic arm with a pair of neural implants, though, Baugh had to undergo a procedure called targeted muscle reinnervation, which reassigned the nerves that once controlled his arms and hands.

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You've been able to catch up with episodes of Jersey Shore through MTV's iOS and Android apps for around a year. But, if you wanted to gasp along with the action as it was broadcast, you'd have to make an appointment to take over the family TV. Thankfully, the reality channel has updated apps on both platforms to bring a live feed of both MTV and MTV2 to your device (assuming you have a participating pay-TV provider to log-in with). That said, we can't imagine anyone persisting with the feature for too long - those ad-breaks are a lot shorter when you're catching up.

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Amazon has just launched a new service called Prime Now, which will let Prime members order "tens of thousands" of "daily essentials" for immediate delivery. Once you download the new app (on Android or iOS), you'll get the option of picking a one- or two-hour delivery between 6AM and midnight, with Uber-like tracking included. The fastest option will run $7.99 per order and two hour deliveries are free for Prime members. The service looks like a response to Google's same-day Shopping Express launched last year, which offers same day (but not one-hour) delivery at $5 a pop, or $99 a year. Prime Now will operate exclusively in Manhattan to start with, but Amazon has promised that it'll soon be coming "to a city near you."

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Now that the ESA has landed on a comet, NASA wants to do them one better: capture an entire asteroid (or a piece of one) and put it in orbit around the moon in 2019. But the space agency has now said that it's delaying a decision on exactly how the Asteroid Redirect Mission will do that until 2015. Option A involves bagging and capturing an entire meteorite about 30 feet across, while option B would see them landing on larger target, Philae-style, and digging out a boulder-sized chunk (see the video below). In both cases, it will be towed back to the moon and placed in orbit there. Astronauts launching from the upcoming Space Launch System (SLS) in an Orion capsule will then intercept the orbiting meteorite in 2020, retrieve samples and return to Earth.

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Derby was born with deformations in both of his front legs, making movement and any kind of speed difficult, if not impossible. Now, he can run. The husky mix was fitted out with two prosthetics, custom-made on 3D sculpting software to fit the pup's forearms. With some help from 3D Systems and several iterations later, and the curved prosthetics you see above became the final build. "The great thing about using 3D technology in Derby's case, is having these images on file on a computer, and being able to print them. [It] is a lot quicker than having to hand sculpt every single mold and rebuild these braces five to ten times," explained Kevin Atkins, 3D Systems' Freeform Product Manager. The team settled on these curved designs because there was the fear that more pointed iterations (like running blades seen on humans) would get caught in softer ground.

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The Bay Bridge and its LED lights

The 25,000 computer-driven LED lights on San Francisco's Bay Bridge were only meant to be part of a two-year art project, but it looks like they'll eventually become a permanent (and frankly, rather pretty) part of the landscape. The non-profit behind the lights, Illuminate the Arts, has raised the $4 million necessary to both cover the costs of new gear and reinstall the lights after they're taken down during cable maintenance. From then on, transportation authority Caltrans will pay the $250,000 a year it takes to keep the illumination running. There will be a period where the bridge will go dark, but it should resume shining in January 2016 -- conveniently, just ahead of the influx of tourists attending Super Bowl 50. Not all San Franciscans are fans of the installation (they argue that it's out of sync with the region), but these LEDs are here to stay.

[Image credit: Chris Marra, Flickr]

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Microsoft Research's Xim app for sharing photos can now beam slideshows on screens bigger than phones and tablets through streaming devices. Just log into the wireless network all your other devices are connected to and it will automatically detect any connected Chromecast, Apple TV, Xbox One or Amazon Fire TV that you can use to broadcast images to your television screen. Even better, if a friend initiates a session and you're paired with one of those streaming devices, he can control the images shown on your display.

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Sprint

Sprint can't catch a break. As if its financial woes weren't enough, the outfit was recently accused of letting consumers get billed for "tens of millions" of dollars in unauthorized charges for premium text messages between 2004 and 2013. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's official charges, according to The New York Times, are that Sprint's billing system allowed third-parties to "cram" unauthorized fees onto your monthly statement. That's not all: The Federal Communications Commission is getting in on the action too, with the NYT's sources claiming that Sprint will face $105 million in refunds and restitution as a result of those unauthorized bill additions -- a bit more than it charged AT&T. We're going to imagine the government won't let the Now Network pay its fines $9.99 per month.

[Image credit: JeepersMedia/Flickr]

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Cuban woman on a cellphone

It would be an understatement to call Cuba's existing telecoms modest -- roughly five percent of residents have internet access, and cellphone access is pricey at best. The US may just turn that situation around through its new deal with Cuba, though. As part of the warmer relations, American internet and phone carriers are allowed to set up shop in the Caribbean nation. Companies will also have permission to export devices and apps that help Cubans get in touch with the rest of the world.

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