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The quantum teleportation chip

Until now, quantum teleportation (that is, sending quantum data from one place to another) has required a room-filling machine. That's not going to usher in a brave new era of quantum computing, is it? However, a team of British and Japanese researchers has shrunk things down to a much more reasonable size. They've stuffed the core optical circuits for quantum teleportation into a single silicon chip that's just slightly longer than a penny -- in contrast, an experimental device from 2013 was nearly 14 feet long. While scientists built the chip using "state-of-the-art nano-fabrication," it should be more practical to make than its ancestors, which took months.

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The issue of booth babes -- scantily clad people attempting to lure unsuspecting buyers towards second-rate products -- has once again reared its head within the industry. This time out, cryptography and information security gathering RSA has effectively banned them, mandating that all attendees will wear clothing that's appropriate for a professional environment. According to a statement released to TechTarget, people will be unable to display "excessive cleavage," and won't be able to wear tank tops, tube tops, miniskirts or minidresses. RSA go on to say that any scantily dressed people found on the show floor would be asked to put on a sweater or leave.

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A Blackpoll Warbler with a geolocator

It's easy to prove that big birds like gulls will cross oceans when they migrate, but tiny birds are another matter -- the trackers you need are usually enormous in comparison. The Vermont Center for Ecostudies wasn't daunted, though. It successfully tested extra-small geolocators on blackpoll warblers, migratory songbirds that are too small and light (0.4oz) to shoulder previous sensors. The newer device weighs just 0.02oz, and is no bigger than a dime. As you can see above, it was more of a minor inconvenience than a heavy burden.

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Over the past few months, Twitter has added a load of useful features to TweetDeck on the web, leaving the desktop app to age. Well, the Mac version of the 140-character social network software is finally getting some of those tools. With an update today, TweetDeck for Mac handles the newfangled shared account option for groups and allows for DMs (and using them to share tweets) with more than one person. You can also add up to four images per tweet and both GIFs and video footage plays in-line from any column. All of these features have been live on the web already, but it's nice to see the folks at Twitter giving some overdue attention to the desktop software. If you haven't already been alerted to the new version, nab it from the Mac App Store right here.

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Phase One has debuted what it's calling "the world's smallest" 80-megapixel medium format camera. The Phase One iXU 180 weighs just two pounds and its body is barely bigger than the Schneider-Kreuznach lense it's attached to. That means the entire rig is light enough to fit aboard the gyroscopes of most commercially available quadcopters and ultralight UAVs. What's more, the IR-capable iXU 180 can be employed as either a standalone device akin to a GoPro or as part of a multi-camera array.

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People playing Eve Valkyrie

It's been a very rough 18 months for the makers of Eve Online, CCP. The company has lost money, canceled the long-delayed World of Darkness MMO, laid off well over 100 employees and said goodbye to two high-profile execs. It also hasn't released any financial statements or subscriber figures since revealing a drop in revenues in June 2014 -- in this case, no news is unlikely to be good news. But there's a plan to turn things around at CCP. It's making substantial changes to Eve Online in an attempt to attract new players, and has poured money into research and development with a big focus on virtual reality. Now, it's gearing up to release Eve Valkyrie, a AAA, competitive multiplayer shooter for Oculus Rift and Sony's Morpheus PS4 headset. The stakes are high, but this big bet on VR might just pay off.

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Facebook Riff on the iPhone

No, Facebook isn't done experimenting with mobile apps yet -- meet Riff, a just-launched app for Android and iOS that has you building collaborative videos. You start by recording a short clip (under 20 seconds) and giving it a topic. After that, your friends can tack on their own videos based around that theme. For example, you can start a "what I do for a living" compilation to find out what all your friends are working on. There's definitely the potential for pranksters to ruin the whole thing, but Facebook lets you either delete individual clips (if you're the creator) or report a whole video if it's going horribly off-track.

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Add another one to the slate of Sling TV options: subscribers to the streaming TV service will be able to get HBO soon. There's no word on an exact launch date, but Sling says it will be in time for the new season of Game of Thrones and Silicon Valley, which launch on April 12th. It's not the (still Apple-exclusive for online providers) HBO Now service, it's just regular HBO, with one live channel and video on-demand access. According to the Wall Street Journal, the deal is the result of negotiations between Sling's owner Dish Network and HBO's owner Time Warner that will also keep channels like TBS, TNT and TruTV on the satellite TV network. Adding the channel to Sling's $20 per month base package with AMC, TNT, ESPN and a few others will cost subscribers an extra $15 once it's available.

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AT&T store

AT&T's attempt to turn the tables on the Federal Trade Commission's mobile data throttling lawsuit hasn't exactly worked out as planned. A federal judge has rejected the carrier's claims that it can't be sued because its status as a common carrier for voice, which exempts it from FTC oversight, also applies to data. This exception only applies to the services that they're meant to cover, according to the court -- while the Federal Communications Commission's upcoming net neutrality rules will factor in mobile data, they aren't in effect right now. The judge also says AT&T misrepresented the whole point of the rule. It's intended to prevent overlap between common carrier regulations, not (as the network suggested) regulations as a whole. In short, AT&T will have to deal with the consequences of limiting its unlimited data customers, whether that's a slap on the wrist or a serious change in policy.

[Image credit: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan]

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For a large group of people, Netflix has become the primary way to watch TV shows and movies in the living room. Digging into a menu and launching the app every day can be a pain though. The solution? TV remotes that offer a dedicated Netflix button, of course. They've been available in the US for years, but finally they're coming to Europe too. For starters, Netflix is partnering with Sony, Panasonic, Toshiba, Philips and Vestel to offer the new remotes with several of their smart TVs, Blu-ray players and set-top boxes. The company says the move is part of its larger mission to work more closely with hardware manufacturers and optimize its service for subscribers. If that leads to a reduction in the amount of time spent between switching on the TV and watching Bloodline, count us in.

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