Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Philae had a bumpy landing on the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet last November, but that didn't stop it from relaying some important data back to Earth. Papers published in the journal Science reveal how scientists, using the data collected by Philae's onboard instruments, have been able to identify the internal structure of the comet, its daily fluctuations in temperature and organic compounds that could help support life.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

While Curiosity's doing a great job on the red planet, there are still areas it can't go to, such as steep cliffs/hills and locations hidden by permanent shadows. That's why the engineers at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Swamp Works laboratory are developing drones that can withstand harsh conditions on other planets and navigate extraterrestrial terrain. These machines, collectively called "Extreme Access Flyers," will be gathering samples from places rovers can't access. They'll have rotors much larger than the ones you see on regular quadcopters and will use cold-gas jets to lift off and maneuver themselves. They need those, because Mars has a thin atmosphere and the other two target locations -- asteroids and the moon -- have no air. In addition, they'll have to be able to fly autonomously, since there's no GPS out there and they'll be too far from Earth to be controlled by a ground team.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

CHINA-TECHNOLOGY-CES ASIA

Sharp's financial problems have forced it to leave the LCD TV business in North America. Chinese TV maker Hisense has paid a mere $23.7 million for the company's Mexican factory and the right to use the Sharp brand in North and South America. Sharp lost 34 billion yen ($274 million) last quarter and $13.4 billion over the last four years, according to Bloomberg. Though the Japanese company recently received a $1.8 billion bailout, president Kozo Takahashi said "we have to consider all options, including a spinoff of the LCD business. The LCD market is changing very rapidly."

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

India Uber Investment

Uber has big plans for India -- specifically, $1 billion worth. The taxi-hailing company announced last night that it would make the investment to expand its ridership in India to 1 million rides per day by 2016. Currently, estimates put Uber at around 200,00 daily rides in India, according to the Financial Times. Just like it has in the US and other markets, the company likely aims to use the funding to entice both drivers and riders to join its service. It also helps Uber compete against local competition -- in India's case, that's Ola, which has already raised $400 million on its own. Uber's Indian investment is on par with the $1 billion it plans to spend in China this year. Uber has also had to deal with controversy in India: A sexual assault by a driver last year led to New Delhi temporarily banning the service, forcing Uber to launch a panic button allowing riders to get help from local authorities.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Recon Instruments makes tech-friendly snow and cyclist headwear with built-in GPS, displays and more. Recon's Jet glasses even have a camera on board -- but it's limited to 15-second videos. Riders, runners and powder-fiends who own either the Snow2 or Jet can now eke out a little extra functionality, thanks to an app that'll let you control a GoPro, right from the headset's touch controls. Called "MyGoproRemote2," the app functions just like GoPro's own mobile offering, with all the same options -- preview, record, change settings and so on. Your Snow or Jet connects to the camera over WiFi, so it's likely a burden on the battery for both devices, but that's the price of not having to carry a phone or GoPro remote we guess. The app's confirmed to work with Hero3 and Hero4 cameras, and can be snapped up (for free) from Recon's Engage app store.

0 Comments

Net Neutrality. The internet as a public utility. Hooray? The FCC is already receiving a lot of complaints from customers that are sick of data caps, slow speeds and possibly uncompetitive prices. According to the National Journal, a lot of the ire has been directed at a predictable list of offenders: AT&T, Comcast and Verizon -- a company that now owns AOL. So far there's no proof of violating net neutrality rules where service providers are blocking or otherwise slowing web services. But as these providers are reclassified as carriers, it lets customers complain when they feel that what the companies are doing are unreasonable. If you've got a complainin' itch to scratch, you can file your own over on the FCC's website. These entries are forwarded to the offending carrier, which has to respond within 30 days.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Google

When French regulator CNIL told Google it must apply "right to be forgotten" requests globally last month, it gave the company 15 days to comply or face further action. That deadline came and went without a whisper from the search giant, but it's taken another 34 days for it to muster a reply. In a blog post, Peter Fleischer, Global Privacy Counsel at Google, called CNIL's order "disproportionate and unnecessary," arguing that if it had obeyed its demand, France would essentially set the standard for internet regulation.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

ICYMI: Google Goes Pollution Hunting, Amazon's Easy Button and More

Today on In Case You Missed It: Google Street View cars are rolling through U.S. cities to measure pollution, measuring harmful compounds like methane and carbon monoxide. Amazon's new Dash buttons are now available, which let consumers instant-order basic household items with a push of a literal button. And NASA is crashing planes to help improve the reliability of Emergency Location Transmitters, so that the signal actually turns on when something goes terribly wrong.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

BMW Vehicles On Display At The Company's Headquarters

Electric vehicles could be our salvation from traditional gas guzzlers, but mass adoption poses new challenges. If millions of homeowners start charging their cars every night, will the power grids be able to keep up? California utility company PG&E is partnering with BMW for a trial -- announced in January but starting this month -- that solves the problem by compensating i3 drivers for non-peak charging. Here's how it works: PG&E will contact BMW when they want to curb consumption. The car company will then select drivers based on their "desired departure time" submitted in the BMW i Remote app. So if you have a flat battery and need to make a trip in the next couple of hours, BMW shouldn't throttle your home and leave you without a ride. Those that are affected will receive a notification and have the option to "opt out" of the one-hour delay, should it prove to be a bad time.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Nvidia has issued a recall for the Shield Android tablet after determining that its battery "can overheat, posing a fire hazard." Although the recall is voluntary, Nvidia is asking users to back up their data and fill in the relevant online form to receive a replacement. The issue pertains to tablets sold between July 2014 and July 2015. You can check to see if your tablet is affected by heading to the Settings menu, clicking "About tablet," then "Status," and looking at the "Battery" section. If you see "B01," you can carry on using the Shield as normal. If you see "Y01," though, your tablet is at risk of overheating and you should arrange a replacement ASAP.

0 Comments

Must Reads