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Even though the wearable space is flooded with a ton of options, most of those are geared toward grown-ups. And, hey, why not let the little ones join the fun too. Earlier this year, LG introduced the KizOn in South Korea, a wearable for children that made it easy for them to communicate with their parents. Today, that same device is coming to the US on Verizon, but here it will be known as the GizmoPal. The idea behind LG's new wearable is extremely simple, as it only requires being set up with a pre-configured number and, using a single button, kid(s) can then easily make or receive a call to and from it. The GizmoPal also comes with a companion app, available for iOS and Android, which uses GPS features to allow you, the parent, to easily monitor your child's location at all times.

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CBS' coverage of Macy's parade last year featured viewers' Instagram photos shown on screen -- this year, it's expanding audience's participation even more. The network will use the same service it used in 2013 called Vidpresso, but instead of showing just Instagram pics, it'll also air tweets and Facebook status updates. Anchors or the people behind the camera merely have to choose the posts they want to broadcast, and they'll show up instantly as tickers or graphics, without the need for further editing. Vidpresso, which was founded by former Engadget editor Randall Bennett, provides broadcasters an affordable way to get viewers involved in discussions on air. It needs only some pieces of hardware (a Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K and a scan converter, among a handful of others) and a subscription to the service. The system needs to know that you want your posts shown on TV, though. So, you'll have to take a break from prepping that turkey, make those profiles public and tag every post you don't mind showing the whole country with #tdaycbs.

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Airdog drone

It's not enough to simply strap an action camera on your helmet these days; now that you can mount a camera on a drone or get one built-in, aerial sports footage is the way to go. And GoPro knows it, apparently. The Wall Street Journal hears that GoPro is creating its own line of camera-equipped multirotor drones. Details are scarce at this early stage, but the range is meant to cost between $500 to $1,000 and should ship by the end of 2015. The company isn't confirming the rumor, although it's not too worried about being late to the party -- as a spokesman tells the Journal, plenty of people are already capturing footage with GoPro cams strapped to unmanned aircraft. With that said, it's likely eager to have its own airborne robotic camera before DJI, Parrot and other drone makers become too powerful.

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It's the night before Thanksgiving, and that means you're probably cooking, chatting with relatives and formulating your epic Black Friday attack plan. Need some help? No problem. We rounded up all the best tech deals available this holiday season. Read on for all the rest of our news highlights from the last 24 hours, including Deepak Chopra's app, a keyboard-shaped waffle maker and the latest on Sony Pictures' network troubles.

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Assassin's Creed: Unity's infamous face glitch

Ubisoft may not have a way to turn back time and release Assassin's Creed Unity without a slew of glitches, but it's at least trying to make amends to jilted gamers. The studio has announced that it's giving every Unity owner a free copy of the upcoming Dead Kings add-on that they'd have previously had to buy. That's not a radical concept in itself (Driveclub's developer is doing the same), but Ubi is going one step further by giving Season Pass holders their choice of free game, such as Far Cry 4 or Watch Dogs. And for that matter, it's scrapping sales of the Season Pass altogether. Existing subscribers will still get extra content, but latecomers will have to buy extras one at a time. The company is clearly aware that it did something wrong -- let's just hope that it learns its lesson and takes its time polishing future games.

[Image credit: King_Anesti, Steam Community]

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It's that time of year again! You know, the one when you have to hand over your hard-earned cash or dole out the credit card digits to get the loved ones in your life a little something celebratory. Lucky you, we've got a slew of great recommendations in our easy-on-the-eyes Holiday Gift Guide.

Need something for that all-too-hip member of the fam? Then consider this: Lomography's Diana Deluxe Kit brings back the kitsch of the light leak prone plastic camera to deliver photos with Instagram filter-like results. And it comes with a slew of lenses and viewfinders so you can always capture that magic shot.

And that's just a taste of what our gift guide has to offer. Dive in here for the full monty!

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AT&T

AT&T isn't backing down from its threat to halt its fiber rollout, which was a not-so-subtle jab at President Obama's pro-net neutrality / Title II comments earlier this month. Following an FCC inquiry about that announcement, AT&T said in a letter today that it's still going to move forward with existing fiber commitments -- it's just not going to make any new plans. AT&T's in a bit of a tricky spot: It already agreed to bring fiber to 2 million homes as part of its massive $48.5 billion Direct TV acquisition (which is still under regulatory review). But, well, new regulation bad! "AT&T simply cannot evaluate additional investment beyond its existing commitments until the regulatory treatment of broadband service is clarified," Robert Quinn, the company's senior vice president of federal regulatory, wrote in the letter. Check out AT&T's full response to the FCC below.

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Twitter for Android on a Nexus 5

It's no secret that Twitter has been looking for ways to put more targeted ads in your social feed, but its latest approach may make you uncomfortable if you jealously protect your privacy. The service has revealed that its app will start tracking which apps you have installed on your device in order to improve the relevance of both ads and other content that slips into your tweet stream, such as favorites. Twitter is adamant that it's not collecting data from within apps, and will let you know when the monitoring kicks in. However, those safeguards are offset by the feature's opt-out nature -- the service will automatically scoop up that info unless you explicitly tell it otherwise.

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Thanksgiving is a time to remember things to be grateful for, stuff yourself with turkey and watch MST3k re-runs. But what happens the following day, when you wake up with a meat hangover that could kill a horse? That's the moment you'll stumble online, looking for new ways to lose weight and find OMsignal's biometric smart shirt. The fashionable piece is a sports-style compression garment that monitors your breathing, heart rate and step count, so I know that as I write this, I'm taking 18 breaths a minute and my heart is beating 76 times every 60 seconds. Neat, huh?

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CCC convention goer works on a laptop

Want to see a classic example of irony? Head to the US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (CERT) website. The government security group has issued a public warning about Regin... you know, the extra-sophisticated malware that many suspect the US wrote to spy on telecom networks. It's more than a little amusing to see one agency warn about a problem the other may have created, although it raises a few questions when there haven't been similarly direct warnings for (allegedly) state-created attacks like Stuxnet and Duqu. Is it evidence that the US wasn't involved, or that Regin is out of control? An attempt to throw people off the scent? Or something else?

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