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Mark Zuckerberg's original Facebook profile

In a Q&A on his profile today, Mark Zuckerberg explained how he and his team are preparing Facebook for the future. In it, he revealed that he believes the ultimate communication technology will allow us to send thoughts to each other. "You'll just be able to think of something and your friends will immediately be able to experience it too if you'd like," he said. But until that happens, the company is focusing on developing (1) AI, because the company "think[s] more intelligent services will be much more useful" to consumers, (2) VR, as it's the "next major computing and communication platform," and (3) its internet.org project, since it's "the most basic tool people need to get the benefits of the internet," including jobs, education and communication.

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The sun pokes through a forest

Don't look now, but the plants in your backyard might just shape the next generation of cars. University of Freiburg researchers have found a way to study the junctions between living plants' branches and stems using MRI scans, giving insight into how they cope under strain. The 3D images should show how you can build a lightweight, fiber-based structure that can still take some punishment -- particularly helpful for cars and bikes, where fiber already helps shed a lot of unnecessary pounds. They could help produce sturdier buildings, too. While there's still plenty of work left before plant scanning is practical, it's possible that a tree or flower could make your future ride a lot nimbler and speedier.

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Yahoo has given Aviate its first major makeover since acquiring it in 2014, completely replacing its contextual panel called "Spaces" with a new feature called "Smart Stream." This "stream" surfaces different cards throughout the day, depending on your location and activity. Sound familiar? Yep, the company might not admit it, but it's obviously Mayer and team's answer to Google Now. According to its official announcement, a card can pop up with nearby restos once you walk into a different city or town. It can also show live scores of games you've been waiting for and can put music apps to the top of the app list when you plug in a pair of headphones. Unfortunately, a quick peek at the reviews on Google Play shows that a lot of users aren't happy with the drastic change -- one reviewer even exclaimed "We don't need another Google Now!" After all, people who do like Google Now will use it instead of something that looks like it.

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GarageBand on a MacBook Pro

Apple's Force Touch trackpads haven't done a whole lot in official apps besides fast scrolling and shortcuts, but they'll do considerably more if you grab the latest version of GarageBand. As of the 10.1 update, you can use the pressure-sensitive pad on newer MacBooks and MacBook Pros to vary the strength of certain tools -- if you want to subtly finesse a track using only your finger, you can. This is also a big upgrade if you're an aspiring DJ, since there's both a virtual morph pad as well as gobs of new dance- and hip-hop-friendly audio kits. You can check out all of GarageBand's new tricks for free if you already have GarageBand (not hard if you bought a relatively modern Mac), and it'll cost $5 if you're completely new.

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Sprint Corp. Stores Ahead Of Earnings Figures

This morning Sprint announced it planned to "end consumer confusion and frustration" with an "All-in" pricing plan that combined unlimited data with a two-year phone lease for $80 total. The only problem? An absurd limit capping video streams at 600Kbps. Tonight, CEO Marcelo Claure announced that he has heard consumer frustration with the cap, and Sprint will not place any limits on streaming video with the plan. The press release reveals a bit more detail about the revised plan, saying that "we might have to manage the network in order to reduce congestion" for other customers, so it's still not all good news for the plan. Still, if you don't mind a second-tier experience during busy times, it might be a cheap way to get service and keep re-upping on new phones every couple of years.

[Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images]

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A visual representation of the Codephage

The days of waiting anxiously for bug fixes (assuming they come at all) might soon be over. MIT developers have built a system, CodePhage, that automatically patches flaws by borrowing features from other apps. The tool scans apps to see how they perform security checks, and imports any superior techniques it finds -- whether or not they're written in the same programming language. It doesn't need access to the source code to see what makes something tick, and it'll even check that any fixes are working the way you'd expect. While this is still early and likely wouldn't address every glitch, the hope is that you'll get software which perpetually improves itself. You wouldn't have to worry about security exploits so long as they've been fixed in at least one other program.

[Image credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT]

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Google's been systematically rolling out high frame rate (HFR) video -- that's 60 frames per second -- across its YouTube ecosystem for a couple of months now. HFR debuted on standard videos last October. It hit YT's live streaming service in May and today Google announced that the YouTube mobile app for both iOS and Android will now feature 60 FPS playback. Now you'll be able to follow Far Cry 4 walkthroughs on your mobile device with the same silky smooth playback that you see on your TV.

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Nearly five months after introducing its Air lens camera in Japan, Olympus is finally ready to bring it to the US. The AIR A01, as it's officially named, is a shooter that attaches to and pairs with your smartphone or tablet -- in similar fashion to Sony's QX line of devices. Spec-wise, the Olympus Air features a Micro Four Thirds, 16-megapixel sensor, a TruePic VII image-processing chip, RAW capture, up to 1080p video-recording, 10 fps continuous shooting, Bluetooth and WiFi. There is, of course, a companion app for iOS, Android and Amazon's Kindle platform, which you can use to control the camera as well as transfer images from it.

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grey keyboard red enter button lock symbol leak

VPNs (virtual private networks) are a popular choice for sidestepping censorship and geographic restrictions on services like Netflix with more than 20 percent of Europeans using them. However, researchers at the Queen Mary, University of London recently examined 14 of the region's most popular VPN providers and found nearly all of them leaked information about their users to some degree. These leaks ranged from minor, ie what site you visited, to major infractions including the actual content of your communications.

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Acer's XR341CK curved display

You can get desktop PC displays that are curved, super-wide and gaming-friendly, but all three at once? That's tricky. Thankfully, Acer thinks it has an answer. The company has just launched the 34-inch XR341CK in the US, giving you a curvy, 21:9 aspect ratio LCD with AMD's anti-tearing FreeSync tech built-in. So long as you have a fast-enough gaming rig (including newer AMD graphics, if you want FreeSync), you'll get an extra-immersive canvas for your first-person shooters and racing sims.

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