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Nordstrom's smart fitting room

You've probably had that moment in a store fitting room where you realize you're trying the wrong clothes, but would rather not get dressed again just to check out those pants in a different color. If Nordstrom succeeds with its new eBay-designed fitting room, you won't have to. The experimental technology turns mirrors into interactive displays that give you many of the shopping options you'd have if you were browsing the web. You can not only see if the store has clothing in a different size or style, but have staff bring it to you -- handy if you're still half-naked.

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Moto 360 with a metal band

Did you rush to get a Moto 360 as soon as possible, only to realize that you were (temporarily) stuck with the band that came attached to your smartwatch? You can now do something about it. Motorola has started selling both leather and metal bands by themselves at respective prices of $30 and $70. They're all normal width -- sorry, no slim gold band for you -- but you're otherwise free to buy whatever suits your mood. Just be ready to take your 360 into a jeweler, since you can't perform the transplant yourself.

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Sports bras have been one of Victoria's secrets for a while, but the latest model, "Incredible" warrants at least a passing mention here at Engadget. It houses sensors and other connected technology within the fabric, courtesy of Finnish smart fabric manufacturer Clothing+ - the same company that has been behind sports tech from the likes of Adidas and Under Armour. The $75 bra comes with the electrodes all built-in, but doesn't contain a heart-rate monitor itself. You'll need to connect that at the back, although the listing doesn't specify which "leading brands" you'll be able to do it with. Alongside the lack of actual heart-rate monitor, there's also no color-changing feature when your similarly-dressed sibling is nearby -- but we're sure customers will cope.

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It was supposed to be Spotify. Instead, it looks like Adidas will rely elsewhere to get more music for miCoach Smart Run users to listen to during workout sessions. Thanks to a new partnership with MixRadio, Adidas is bringing Nokia's Microsoft's music-streaming service to its Android-powered watch, giving runners access to more than 34 million songs right from their wrist -- and yes, they work offline. Naturally, miCoach Smart Run owners need a subscription to MixRadio in order to access the hefty catalogue, but Adidas does have a limited time promotion that offers six months of free access when signing up. Before you can do any of that, however, you'll have to download an over-the-air update for the Smart Run, which is available now via the settings menu.

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The European Union wants Google to extend the range and impact of the "right to be forgotten" measures that passed earlier this year. The proposal would take the current limitation of EU-only domains like those ending in ".fr" and ".co.uk," and open it to traditional ".com" URLs, according to The Wall Street Journal. Meaning, it'd help to close the current loophole that lets you sidestep any removed websites where unflattering information might exist simply by searching on Google.com as opposed to a European variation like Google.de.

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For entertainment services such as Netflix and Spotify, the all-you-can-eat model has been tremendously beneficial -- both have racked up millions and millions of subscribers to date. When it comes to offering mobile applications, though, that idea of subscriptions hasn't really taken off. Regardless of whether you're an independent developer or a major brand, you depend heavily on storefronts like Apple's App Store or Google Play to sell and promote your content. But Opera Software, known mostly for its web browsers, wants to change this. With its new Subscription Mobile Store initiative, Opera wants to give companies a platform to offer their apps through, as the name suggests, a subscription service.

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Even though the wearable space is flooded with a ton of options, most of those are geared toward grown-ups. And, hey, why not let the little ones join the fun too. Earlier this year, LG introduced the KizOn in South Korea, a wearable for children that made it easy for them to communicate with their parents. Today, that same device is coming to the US on Verizon, but here it will be known as the GizmoPal. The idea behind LG's new wearable is extremely simple, as it only requires being set up with a pre-configured number and, using a single button, kid(s) can then easily make or receive a call to and from it. The GizmoPal also comes with a companion app, available for iOS and Android, which uses GPS features to allow you, the parent, to easily monitor your child's location at all times.

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CBS' coverage of Macy's parade last year featured viewers' Instagram photos shown on screen -- this year, it's expanding audience's participation even more. The network will use the same service it used in 2013 called Vidpresso, but instead of showing just Instagram pics, it'll also air tweets and Facebook status updates. Anchors or the people behind the camera merely have to choose the posts they want to broadcast, and they'll show up instantly as tickers or graphics, without the need for further editing. Vidpresso, which was founded by former Engadget editor Randall Bennett, provides broadcasters an affordable way to get viewers involved in discussions on air. It needs only some pieces of hardware (a Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K and a scan converter, among a handful of others) and a subscription to the service. The system needs to know that you want your posts shown on TV, though. So, you'll have to take a break from prepping that turkey, make those profiles public and tag every post you don't mind showing the whole country with #tdaycbs.

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Airdog drone

It's not enough to simply strap an action camera on your helmet these days; now that you can mount a camera on a drone or get one built-in, aerial sports footage is the way to go. And GoPro knows it, apparently. The Wall Street Journal hears that GoPro is creating its own line of camera-equipped multirotor drones. Details are scarce at this early stage, but the range is meant to cost between $500 to $1,000 and should ship by the end of 2015. The company isn't confirming the rumor, although it's not too worried about being late to the party -- as a spokesman tells the Journal, plenty of people are already capturing footage with GoPro cams strapped to unmanned aircraft. With that said, it's likely eager to have its own airborne robotic camera before DJI, Parrot and other drone makers become too powerful.

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