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We trotted out some truly precious puppies to announce the winners of this year's Readers' Choice Awards, but now it's time to get down to business. As we do every year, we tasked our editor's with the monumental feat of sifting through the previous year's biggest innovations to select the absolute best in show. While there's some crossover with our Readers' Choice winners (sorry Fire phone), there were a few notable exceptions. But you'll have to check out the gallery below to find out what made the cut.

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Remember the Sony-published video magazine PlayStation Underground? Well, it's back after a 14-year hiatus, and like so much of the video world, it's gone digital and now exists as a YouTube show. A post on the PlayStation Blog says that new episodes should publish twice a month, with a plan to change that to once a week in the future. The first show is all about developer Harmonix's Amplitude revamp, with the PS Blog crew playing and talking about the game with studio publicist Nick Chester. In its initial run, Underground snagged interviews with David Jaffe (Twisted Metal) and father of the PlayStation, Ken Kutaragi, so expecting to see some pretty big names grace the new show's couch doesn't seem too far fetched. And unless Amplitude appears on the PlayStation Store tonight, the original release window was this March, Underground's 21-minute clip below is probably your best chance at peeping new game-play for now.

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The 11th Annual Engadget AwardsThe votes for the 11th Annual Engadget People's Choice Awards have been tallied and the winners are in. As is always the case, there were some very polarizing products on the ballot and many of the honorees won by a very small margin. But the real winners this year were the cute and adoptable puppies at the San Francisco Animal Care and Control (SFACC) shelter. The only thing we love here at Engadget more than true innovation is man's best friend, so we teamed up with the SFACC for a special awards ceremony. Early last week, a set of the most eligible animals in San Francisco accepted "trophies" on behalf of the companies that created your favorite gadgets and software of 2014. To find out who took top honors check out the video above, and to take home one of our special guests, please visit the SFACC for more information.
And check back this afternoon to find out what won this year's Editors' Choice awards.

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Einstein was wrong -- about the quantum mechanical phenomena known as superpositioning and wave form collapse, at least. A team from Australia's Griffith University and Japan's University of Tokyo, have proven that both are tangible phenomena, not simply mathematical paradoxes. See, back when he was still reigning "smartest guy on the planet," Einstein just couldn't wrap his massive intellect around the theory of superpositioning (or as he called it, "spooky action across distance"). That is, a particle in superposition effectively exists in both places at once (not unlike Schroedinger's Cat) until you observe it at either location. At which time the particle you aren't looking at ceases to exist (a process known as wave function collapse). What's more, the disappearing particle seems to know that its twin has been discovered through some mechanism that happens instantly, literally traveling faster than the speed of light -- a clear violation of Einstein's theory of relativity.

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If the ability to stream Taylor Swift's music has you eyeing Tidal, Jay Z & Co. just sweetened the deal. Ahead of a relaunch event this evening, the streaming service cut it's monthly rate in half. That's right, instead of shelling out $20 for spinning the lossless catalog, you'll now need to commit $10 per month. According to the company's Twitter account, the drop in price doesn't mean that you'll get access to less, either. Subscriptions still include the same content, with high-definition streaming being the key feature. The move allows Tidal to compete with the likes of Spotify, Rdio, Beats Music and others when it comes to pricing. What's more, early reports indicate that exclusive content and artist partnerships are two things Mr. Carter hopes will lure eager listeners to the service. While the finer points are unclear right now, we'll surely get a clearer picture during the event that's set to begin at 5PM ET today.

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Amazon PrimeAir drone

When Amazon said it would take its delivery drone testing abroad, it wasn't kidding. The Guardian has learned that the internet shopping giant is testing its robotic Prime Air couriers in Canada (the province of British Columbia, to be exact) to get around what it sees as frustratingly slow US approval. As Amazon's Paul Misener explains, the company isn't willing to wait until American regulators find an "impetus" to legalize these drones. It rejects the Federal Aviation Administration's portrayal of US airspace as uniquely complex. Canada and European countries also have a lot of air traffic, but they've still approved lots of testing and commercial drone flights.

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Tesla will show off a brand new thing on Thursday, April 30, at its Hawthorne Design Studio, CEO Elon Musk tweeted today. Musk promises that this is not a car, but it is a "major" new product line. We'll have all the news as soon as it's announced, so check back here on April 30 for the big reveal.

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T-Mobile store in New York City

If you've relied on carrier coverage maps to decide who gets your business, you know that they're sometimes sketchy. A good connection on the map could still mean lousy service in your neighborhood, for instance. T-Mobile thinks it has a better solution: it just launched a crowdsourced coverage map. Instead of simply predicting the quality you're likely to get, the map draws on usage data (including customer reports and speed tests) to tell you what connections you can realistically expect. The maps are also updated twice a month, so you won't have to trust that months-old information is still accurate.

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A DJ mixes at Native Instruments' WMC 2015 event

DJ equipment has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent years, but digital music formats? Not so much -- unless your software is clever enough, you usually have to mix whole tracks rather than just the parts that make sense for your set. Native Instruments aims to fix that with Stems, a free and open file format tailor-made for the DJ crowd. The tracks will play as usual in most music apps, but the right software lets you independently control the bass, drums, melody and vocals. You could drop singing if you don't want it during a transition, for instance, or apply effects to the beat without touching anything else.

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Mobile devices may not be able to handle all of the tasks needed project ready for print, but they are certainly handy for getting work started. Back in the fall, Adobe launched Brush CC, Shape CC, and Color CC that allow you to quickly nab useful bits of smartphone photos for use in full-on desktop applications like Photoshop and Illustrator. Today, the software company announced Comp CC: a new iPad app that pulls items from a user's Creative Cloud Library to get started on print, web and mobile app layouts while on the go.

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