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Over the past few years, social networks have become an extremely powerful tool for every journalist, whether it's here in the United States or elsewhere across the world. But social networks like Twitter and Facebook aren't just a venue for sharing links or live-tweeting breaking news events, as great as that is -- it's also about the engagement one can have with readers and other fellow journalist. Knowing this, The Times of India has recently implemented a new policy that requires its journalism employees to hand over Twitter and Facebook passwords, as it looks to gain control of what they can and cannot post on their social accounts.

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Argentina Inflation App

Time spent with friends is supposed to be cherished. Nowadays, however, the existence of things like Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter make those moments a little less special for some people, namely because they keep their eyes hooked to whatever device they have near them. To that end, according to Deadline, Fox has green-lit a TV sitcom called All Together Now, which features a plot based on six friends in their late 20's who are keen to unplug from their mobile devices and interact with one another "for as long as they can stand it." All Together Now is set to be produced by Alec Sulkin and Julius Sharpe, who most recently worked with Fox on Dads, a show canceled last May, after only one 19-episode season, due to very bad reviews. The new sitcom still hasn't begun production, so it'll likely be a while before it premieres -- hopefully it's enough time for you to gather your thoughts and realize that this is really happening.

[Image credit: Associated Press]

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Casio continues to inch its G-Shock series towards something a little smarter, while holding onto a simple monochrome LCD display and that distinctly G-Shock styling. The "G'mix" GBA-400 improves on the typical digital watch feature list through Bluetooth, a pair of dedicated apps (one for the watch part, one for the music playing part) and your smartphone, whether it's iOS or Android. Oh and there's a giant dial control on the side and it's really satisfying to play with.

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A Galaxy Note all locked up

You may have good reason to safeguard your privacy these days, but would you hand over the goods if someone paid you? For some people, the answer is "yes." Companies like Luth Research have been paying willing subjects a modest amount (in Luth's case, $100 per month) to track their devices' locations, web histories and app usage to improve advertising and shopping. Ford, for example, used the technology this year to see how prospective buyers research a car; it could tell if participants bought a vehicle after visiting its site, or if they were using their phone to research alternatives in the showroom. These monitoring schemes are hardly low-profile, either. Verizon recently launched a voluntary program that promises rewards if you share your positioning and web info.

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The digitally created city of Meereen in 'Game of Thrones'

We've already seen how digital effects make Game of Thrones' world more believable, but there were some spectacular scenes in the show's fourth season: giant city-states, an undead horse and battles involving thousands of cavalry. Want to know just how important computer graphics were in bringing those moments to life? Graphics house Rodeo FX will gladly show you. As you'll see in the footage below, some environments (such as Meereen's pyramid-laden landscape) depended very heavily on computer effects, with only a few live humans and real-world places involved. And that cavalry battle demanded even more work -- animators populated the field with "smart" horse soldiers that reacted both to each other and the world around them. You may not want to watch the demo clip if you haven't caught up on the show, but it's otherwise worth checking out to see how fantasy and reality can blend together.

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We've seen drones used for all sorts of things from film production to package delivery. Now, it seems Disney may be looking to leverage the aerial vehicles for its theme parks. The company has applied for three patents that employ the remote-controlled gadgets for floating projection displays and airborne marionettes. That latter option is meant to boost hovering parade characters that have been limited to gas-filled balloons with little mobility, while the former uses UAVs to float a screen over park visitors. The third scenario is one where the individual drones each carry a lighting rig to achieve the desired effect. Something like fireflies after dark, we'd surmise. All three projects would be commanded from a "ground control station" to coordinate flight paths. Of course, with this being an application, there's no guarantee that you'll encounter the compact flying vehicles at Disneyland anytime soon, but the outfit's R&D department has a knack for coming up with awesome ideas.

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iPod nano watch band

If you ask many pundits when Apple will unveil its often-rumored wearable device, many of them will say October. However, we may have to revise those expectations a bit. Recode's sources now claim that Apple will unveil the gadget on September 9th -- you know, the same day that many expect to see at least one new iPhone. There's little to back the claim at this point beyond the site's reputation for accurate leaks, but the timing makes sense given that the iPhone and the mystery wristwear are expected to work virtually hand-in-hand. As for actual technical details? Besides the expected fitness and home automation support, there isn't much more to say -- most likely, you'll have to wait a couple more weeks to get the full scoop.

[Image credit: Ruben Schade, Flickr]

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Heart rate-tracking in-ear headphones are starting to pop up on the regular it seems. A couple weeks ago, SMS Audio revealed its collaborative effort with Intel, and now Jabra's joining the fray, but without the tether. In an effort to limit cord tangles, the audio outfit's Sport Pulse wireless earbuds connect to your phone via Bluetooth for sorting tunes and tracking your pulse. Dolby sound handles the listening duties while an in-line remote wrangles those mid-run track changes. Inside, an optical, biometric heart rate monitor keeps tabs on your workout, beaming collected data to the Sport Life companion app and peppering your activity with personalized coaching for added motivation. And as you might expect, the software helps plan workouts and logs info from each session. The wireless set goes on sale October 1st for $200 (£200), but you can pre-order now if you're unable to contain the excitement.

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Back when it introduced its first smartwatch, there's no doubt that Pebble took the crowdfunding world by storm. But, more than two years after Pebble broke and set new records on Kickstarter, a cooler is now doing the same. As of today, Coolest is the most successful Kickstarter ever, at least in terms of money pledged on the site. The project has managed to lure in nearly 50,000 backers and collect a little over $10,424,610 so far, shattering Pebble's previous milestone of $10,266,845. Coolest is pretty much a portable party on wheels, complete with a plethora of built-in accessories, including a removable, waterproof Bluetooth speaker, USB charger, cutting board, storage space for plates and, wait for it, a battery-powered, rechargeable blender. In case that wasn't enough, the do-it-all cooler will be LED-lit on the inside, for those times when you're out camping late, and have a bottle opener to boot -- we all know how important the latter feature is. You still have a chance to try to get your own, but hurry because there are only 58 hours to go.

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Russia's recent crackdown on "things it doesn't want to hear" may take a nostalgic turn if culture committee member (and kickboxer) Batu Khasikov has his way. He wants to invoke the USSR days by banning foreign films that "demonize or present Russia in a primitive, silly way." He said films showing the nation's citizens as a "threat to mankind" should also be a no-no -- like A Good Day to Die Hard and other recent flicks with cliché Russian baddies. Fortunately for Russian action fans (or not, depending on your taste) that film and others would remain, as any ban passed would only apply to new titles. Oddly, the cultural ministry recently made a list of its top foreign film picks, including Apocalypse Now, which it ironically called a critique of "capturing foreign territories."

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