Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

The future?

You can finally buy a virtual reality headset and use it in your home. Right now -- today -- that is possible. It doesn't cost $10,000 and it doesn't come with caveats like, "This is made for developers." Samsung is officially the first to market with an accessible, impressive virtual reality headset, all powered by software from Facebook's recently acquired Oculus VR team. That alone is very exciting: We are standing at the precipice of a new medium, finally technologically possible. Wireless, consumer-grade virtual reality! In your home! Today!

Samsung's Gear VR is both an astounding feat and an illuminating vision into our near future; it's the closest anyone's come to making virtual reality into a palatable consumer experience, and a stark example of how far we still have to go before that dream is completely realized.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

It's that time of year again! You know, the one when you have to hand over your hard-earned cash or dole out the credit card digits to get the loved ones in your life a little something celebratory. Lucky you, we've got a slew of great recommendations in our easy-on-the-eyes Holiday Gift Guide.

Need something for that tech savvy homemaker in the fam? Then consider this: Drop's Bluetooth-connected Scale links up with a smartphone or tablet so you can precisely measure out ingredients to make the perfect meal. It also comes with a companion app packed with recipes and a conversion tool so you can adjust those measurements on the fly.

And that's just a taste of what our gift guide has to offer. Dive in here for the full monty!

0 Comments

US Navy GhostSwimmer drone

It's hard to covertly gather intelligence on the open seas; conventional drones and submarines make it rather obvious that something's up. The US Navy might just have a stealthier option with its experimental GhostSwimmer drone, which recently finished tests. The five-foot-long robot looks and swims much like a shark, letting it spy on enemies (or inspect friendly ships) without being conspicuous -- as long as curious foes don't get too close, anyway. It goes as deep as 300 feet, and it can operate autonomously for long enough that the Navy doesn't have to stay nearby to keep watch.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Threats posted by the people who hacked Sony Pictures appear to have had the desired effect. The Wall Street Journal and The Hollywood Reporter both state, based on anonymous sources, that the largest movie chains will not debut the movie next week. Carmike Cinemas said that it would not be showing the film, while the sources indicate they will be joined by AMC, Cinemark, Regal and Cineplex. In a statement to THR, Regal cited Sony Pictures' 'wavering support' for the film, as well as the threats, as the reason it decided to delay the film's opening. According to Variety, one possibility is to release the movie straight to video on-demand, but so far Sony Pictures has not commented publicly.

0 Comments

BlackBerry's "Classic" phone is a curious bit of fan-service, a seemingly conciliatory blend of old and new designed to appeal to Waterloo's die-hards. It might seem a little odd that the company would choose to go all retro on us in 2014, but there's no denying the formula still has some appeal. Read on for our first impressions.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Vessel on iOS devices

If you've been wondering exactly how former Hulu CEO Jason Kilar would take on internet video heavyweights like YouTube, you now have your answer. Kilar's startup, Vessel, has both opened the doors to video producers and revealed just how you'll use the service when it's open to the public. There will be a regular, ad-laden free version, but you'll also have the option of a $3 per month subscription that gives you both early access and a more "modest" level of advertising. It won't be the ad-free paradise you might like, then, but Vessel is luring creators with higher royalties (they could earn 20 times what they do through ad-only services) and hoping they'll use this to make more and better videos.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

If you use your iPad primarily for reading news and playing games, you're certainly not alone. Facebook definitely realizes that, which is why the social network has updated its iPad app with a new right-hand column (which only appears in landscape mode) that highlights those areas of interest -- news and games -- along with other features that'll hopefully make the app more useful for users of Apple's tablet. Especially of note is a new sidebar module called Trending Articles, which surfaces articles from sources that are relevant to you; either they're related to pages or friends you follow, the city you live in, your favorite sports team or simply news sources you've "liked" on Facebook.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

At Expand NY in November, DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar talked about the erm, friendlier projects the agency is funding, including a mind-controlled robotic arm tested by Pittsburgh native Jan Scheuermann. Her test run has recently ended, but the University of Pittsburgh researchers in charge of project have published a paper detailing how much the limb has improved over the past two years. Before they took off Jan's implants, she could already move not just arm itself, but also its wrist and fingers -- she reportedly even beat her brother at a rock-paper-and-scissors game. "Overall, our results indicate that highly coordinated, natural movement can be restored to people whose arms and hands are paralyzed," said Pitt School of Medicine professor Andrew Schwartz, Ph.D.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Netflix on a Dish Hopper DVR

Not all conventional TV providers are at odds with Netflix. Dish just announced that its second-generation Hopper DVRs (and eventually Joeys) are getting an integrated Netflix app starting today. Yes, you can now jump from satellite broadcasts to internet streaming without switching devices. The interface will be familiar if you've used Netflix elsewhere, but Dish hopes to one day integrate Netflix's library into search results -- you could find House of Cards sitting next to recordings and Dish's own internet services. The app may not make the biggest difference when you probably have at least one living room device that already does subscription internet video. Nonetheless, it's good to see at least one TV giant treating Netflix as a complement to its own services, rather than a mortal enemy.

0 Comments

When Plex first arrived on the Xbox One, we figured it would only be a matter of time before the service made its debut on the PlayStation 4. It's taken two months, but finally the company has released an app for Sony's latest console, giving Plex Pass subscribers another way to stream their favorite shows and movies on their TV. It's begun rolling out in Europe and Asia, but we suspect it'll reach the US PlayStation Store soon enough.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Must Reads