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Audi's execs must have toasted to their autonomous car's success this weekend, because the self-driving RS 7 has successfully conquered the Hockenheimring racing circuit in Germany. While the company's announcement doesn't get into specifics, it says the modified sedan finished each lap in just over two minutes, close to the original two minutes and 10 seconds estimate. It doesn't confirm a top speed either, but the commentator in the video after the break says the car reached 137mph, driving the optimal trajectory you'd expect a top racer to take. As we've mentioned before, the automated RS 7 is completely driverless and uses GPS and photos taken by a 3D imaging camera to track its position down to 1 to 2 centimeters -- something it's obviously executed well during the Hockenheimring stunt.

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Microsoft only just unleashed its October update for the Xbox One, and now it's talking about what to expect next month. The update will hit consoles for those in the preview test group soon, and adds many features Major Nelson and crew say the community has been asking for, including custom backgrounds (with the PS4 getting themes soon, it's Blu-ray 3D all over again), and extra details for profiles. The custom backgrounds will launch with a selection of pictures and the ability to post based on achievements, and after a media player update later in the month, gamers will be able to import any image they want. A returning feature from the Xbox 360 will put details like your location and custom bio back on the profile page, plus a self-curated selection of game clips and achievements. Oh, and those game clips? You'll be able to share them with the masses easily, because the update adds the ability to share any of your favorites directly to Twitter. Check after the break for a video demo and more details on what's coming.

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The driving force behind some of Ubisoft's most successful franchises and best moments is no longer with the game maker as of today. Jade Raymond, executive producer on Assassin's Creed II, Watch Dogs and Splinter Cell: Blacklist, has left the company after ten years of service, the company announced. To do what, exactly? That's anyone's guess. She's been in the AAA space for a good portion of her career, working on The Sims Online prior to joining Ubisoft and being a key voice in the creation of the first two Assassin's Creeds. Given her experience running Ubisoft's Toronto studio, though, it might not be much of a stretch to imagine her going indie and assembling a quick and nimble team entirely of her own -- it wouldn't be the first time we've seen it happen.

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JAPAN-THEATRE-KAFKA FRANCE-ROBOTICS

We've seen robots star in plays before, but the one in a new production of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis doesn't take on a bit role or even a supporting one: it's the show's lead actor. While we feel bad for struggling theater performers who can never seem to get a big break, it seems rather fitting for a robot to take center stage for this particular story. See, The Metamorphosis is about a man who inexplicably turns into a giant insect -- the play's director, Oriza Hirata, just substituted a robot for the bug in this Japanese-French production. Sure, it's a lot easier to just get someone who can act like an automaton, but where's the fun in that?

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Wyatt Cenac: Brooklyn

This week baseball fans tune into their championship series as two once-unlikely contenders do battle for the crown. If you prefer your drama on stage and screen however, you'll probably be saying goodbye to HBO's Boardwalk Empire this weekend as it wraps up its run. Netflix and Amazon both bring highlights on streaming this week too: Netflix has comedian and Daily Show contributor Wyatt Cenac plus the documentary E-Team, while Amazon brings the first few episodes for season two of its comedy series Alpha House. Hit the gallery or just look after the break to check out each day's highlights, including trailers and let us know what you think (or what we missed).

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Apple's graphic when it unveiled the 64-bit A7 chip

Apple may have only introduced 64-bit computing to iPhones and iPads a little over a year ago, but it's already preparing for the day when legacy 32-bit code is gone for good. The Cupertino crew is now telling developers that their iOS apps must include 64-bit support from February 1st onward. While the company won't kick out existing titles, both new apps and updated releases will have to make the switch. Theoretically, this is easy -- developers just have to build apps using the most recent tools and standard settings.

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If you're a germophobe, Kindle user or Disney fan, this issue of the Engadget Daily is for you -- and really, everyone else is invited too. Read on for all our news highlights from the last 24 hours, including Dyson's germ-zapping humidifier, Disney's Big Hero 6, real-life tractor beam technology and more.

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Apple just dropped its 4th quarter earnings a few moments ago, revealing that the folks in Cupertino raked in $42.1 billion in revenue and $8.5 billion in pure profit -- more than enough to take care what it might owe in back taxes. More interestingly, the company moved a total of 39.3 million iPhones over the past three months, along with 12.3 million iPads and 5.5 million Macs. Word that Apple's mobile business had a bang-up three months is hardly a shock -- a record-breaking 10 million iPhone 6/6 Pluses were sold over its first weekend, which CEO Tim Cook said beat all previous milestones "by a large margin". Here's the thing though: iPad sales didn't just dip from last quarter, they dipped year-over-year, too. In fact, the number of iPads Apple has moved this time around was the lowest since the company started reporting tablet sales separately in 2012.

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There's no doubt that video on demand is about to go through its own gold rush era. From giant TV networks like CBS to wireless providers such as Rogers, it looks as if everyone wants to join the fun before it's too late. Taking note of this, film studio Lionsgate and Tribeca Enterprises, the media company behind the Tribeca Film Festival, announced today they are teaming up on a new, subscription-based video-streaming platform. The service will be known as Tribeca Short List and is slated to launch sometime during the first half of 2015. You can expect a "prestigious selection" of movie content from Lionsgate, which will be curated by Tribeca with help from "leading voices in contemporary culture."

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Video-streaming titan Netflix is set to continue its original production efforts with Between, an upcoming six-episode drama series. The story will be produced in partnership with Shomi, a video on-demand service from Canadian wireless carrier Rogers; and City, a television station based out of Toronto. Strangely enough, when Shomi's VOD offering was launched roughly a couple of months ago, it was pegged as a direct competitor to Netflix -- though that's clearly not going to be the case. Plot-wise, Between follows the story of a strange disease in a small town that has abolished everyone under 21 years old, and was created by Canada's own Michael McGowan, director of Still Mine and One Week, among other relatively popular indie films. No definite timing yet, but the series is going to premiere on Shomi and City in Canada, while the rest of the world will be able to catch it on Netflix.

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