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The ARC pen pictured above might look laughably large, but it could be the perfect option for folks with Parkinson's disease. It was created by a group of students from UK's Royal College of Art and the Imperial College London to combat a Parkinson's symptom called micrographia. That's characterized by a patient's handwriting becoming smaller and more cramped as they go along, to the point that it's not readable anymore. This pen prevents that from happening by stimulating key muscles through vibration (it's equipped with motors to make that happen), giving users more control over their hands. Further, its large size makes it more comfortable to hold than regular pens.

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What do you get when you mix leeks, garlic, wine and bull gall, then ferment it in a copper pot for nine days? In the Anglo-Saxon era, this concoction made a terrific treatment for eye styes but recently researchers have found it equally effective against the scourge of modern medicine: antibiotic-resistant MRSA "superbugs." Freya Harrison, a microbiologist at the University of Nottingham, UK working with Dr Christina Lee, an Anglo-Saxon expert from the School of English, found the ancient recipe in Bald's Leechbook, an Old English medical compendium. The two decided to test its against modern skin infections. Using the oldest heirloom vegetable varieties she could find, Harrison brewed up the recipe, then let it stand the requisite time. What she poured out displayed some incredible antibiotic characteristics.

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LG is scheduled to drop something big on April 28th. And if the "G's" in the save the date invites (above) it sent out to the press is any indication, we can most likely expect its next G-series flagship phone. Besides, several Korean publications already revealed that LG will launch the G4 by the end of April. Some of those publications also claimed that the phone will have a 5-inch curved Quad HD display, but there's probably no use speculating if that's true or not when we're this near to seeing the real thing. The South Korean company will hold an event in New York and other locations around the globe (New York, London, Seoul, Singapore and Istanbul), and we'll be there to cover it, so stay tuned!

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Toyota Safety System

You won't have to splurge on a luxury car (or a pricey option package) just to get a vehicle that will brake by itself in a crisis. Toyota has launched a strategy that will bring automatic braking to most of its lineup, not just premium rides. The technology will be a relatively low-cost ($300 to $635) option for just two vehicles at first, the RAV4 Hybrid SUV and Lexus' RX crossover, but the automaker hopes to have it available or included in "nearly all" of its models by the end of 2017. It'll be easy to find in the near future, too. The Avalon sedan is next in line, and a total of seven additional Toyota and Lexus models are on deck this year. Toyota certainly isn't the only company hoping to popularize smart braking, but this plan could be one of the most ambitious.

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Dyson really hates dirt, to the point that it's now come up with a new bladeless fan that can also filter out ultrafine airborne particles -- including viruses, bacteria and pollens -- that are as tiny as 0.1 microns. The aptly-named Pure Cool (AM11) closely resembles Dyson's other fan towers, with the notable difference being the cylindrical glass HEPA filter around the base. After 450 prototypes, the company claims that this filter removes 99.95 percent of ultrafine particles, and it's good for up to 4,382 hours or about six months of continuous use. In other words, if you use the Pure Cool for 12 hours each day, then you'll only need to replace the filter after a year. Of course, it's hard to say whether it'll last just as long in smoggy Beijing, which is where Dyson cleverly chose to do the global launch for the Pure Cool.

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Forcing someone to wear a location tracker apparently constitutes a Fourth Amendment "search" - the Supreme Court effectively said so when ruling on a North Carolina case where a convicted sex offender was forced to wear a GPS monitor at all times in 2013. The offender challenged the court, and while the state's court first ruled in favor of the tracker, stating it was no search at all, the Supreme Court said that didn't follow that court's precedents. And what the Supreme Court says, goes.

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BitSummit has been at the forefront of Japan's independent gaming scene for the past two years, hosting an event that shows off projects from small studios and industry veterans alike, plus live music and an awards show. Last year's showcase attracted 5,000 fans and 130 game developers, including Mega Man designer Keiji Inafune, Epic Games, Sony and Microsoft.

For the 2015 show, BitSummit has partnered with four studios -- 17-Bit, Vitei, Q-Games and Pygmy Studio -- to establish the Japan Independent Games Aggregate, which will oversee all event planning. Plus, one of the leading indie-game promotion houses in the Western world, Indie Megabooth, will help organize BitSummit 2015, lending it an extra layer of delicious credibility. Indie Megabooth President and CEO Kelly Wallick joins JIGA on its board of advisers, and she spoke with us briefly about the new collaboration.

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The chatter surrounding high fidelity listening devices and services picked up over the last year or so (thanks, Neil Young), and Onkyo hopes its new 3-in-1 device will lure you to the land of high definition. The company's aluminum-wrapped DAC-HA300 is not only a portable music player for audiophiles, but it also serves as both a headphone amp and digital-to-analog converter (DAC) for iOS and Android devices, or even your office workstation. With its primary function, the PMP can wrangle up to 128GB of tunes via a microSD card for 192 kHz/24-bit listening, while also serving as a headphone amp for that set of cans you take along on the daily.

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Happy Monday! There's no better way to start the work week than with a big dose of puppy love. Check out the pawesome winners of the 11th annual Engadget Awards. Then it's time to get serious as Tim Cook talks about dangerous discrimination laws popping up across the country. Get all the details on these stories and many more in today's Daily Roundup.

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1968 is when it all changed. On December 9 that year, Douglas Engelbart, a computer scientist at Stanford Research Center, made a 90-minute video presentation that revolutionized the world of computers. He didn't show up on stage at the Computer Conference in San Francisco, instead, he teleconferenced from his research lab 30 miles away -- an unprecedented feat at the time. Now almost half a century later, "the mother of all demos" is being resurrected as an avant garde opera called The Demo. Composers Mikel Rouse and Ben Neill re-imagine Engelbart's demo and the defining moments in his life that led up to it through a hybrid theater performance.

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