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Canon is already competing with the Arri Alexa and Red cameras of the world, but it's about to take this one step further. Meet the ME20F-SH, a high-end video shooter that features a sleek, subtle and somewhat compact design. Most importantly, Canon's new camera can deliver an ISO equivalent of more than 4 million, instantly making it a prime option for people who need to capture footage in super-dark settings -- like a moonless night sky. The company believes its ME20F-SH is also great for production companies making films, reality television and documentaries. However, there are some limitations here. It only does 1080p, for one, which doesn't bode well in terms of being future-proof -- Canon says that had to be done to "achieve the highest possible low-light sensitivity," which would otherwise be reduced if it went with a higher resolution and, consequently, smaller photosites.

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Samsung's earlier prediction for the second quarter of 2015 was spot on: the company has failed to hit its goals when it comes to the sales of its flagship devices. Its operating profits fell four percent to 6.9 trillion won ($5.9 billion), and the mobile division's, in particular, slid to 2.76 trillion won ($2.4 billion) from 4.42 trillion won ($3.8 billion) from the same quarter last year. While those profit numbers are still three percent higher than the last, it's going to be tough to play catch up this second half of 2015, as Apple's slated to reveal its new iPhones -- its main rival in the world of high-end smartphones. In order to combat the expected sales drop, Samsung is "adjusting" (read: dropping) the prices of both the Galaxy S6 and the S6 Edge. It's already planning to introduce new premium smartphones: the company has already teased an event for August 13th, where it's likely to introduce a new Galaxy Note and a larger S6 Edge.

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TrackingPoint's computer-augmented rifle sights, better known as the ShotView targeting system, have set off a wave of controversy and debate since they first debuted in 2014. That debate is about to get even hotter now that security researchers Runa Sandvik and Michael Auger have shown Wired a way to break into the rifle and shut it down or, even worse, change the target to the hacker's choosing.

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Volkswagen's adaptive cruise control

You normally have to spring for higher-end cars to get semi-autonomous features that could save your hide, but Volkswagen is aiming to make them relatively commonplace. The automaker has started shipping its 2016 model line, and most of it will at least make crash avoidance features an option, if not include it as a matter of course. The majority of Golf, Jetta and Touareg models will have the choice of smart cruise control and emergency braking technology that could keep you out of an accident even if you can't react in time; they're standard on Executive trim levels for the CC and Touareg. You'll also find a lane departure system on the CC, Golf, and Touareg, and parking assistance on the Golf.

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Engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center have completed the second phase of a project that aims to improve the reliability of Emergency Location Transmitters (ELTs). These devices are meant to send your coordinates to emergency responders after a plane crash but are often so damaged by the impact that they don't ever turn on. That's why NASA is working with its industry partners to design an ELT system capable of taking a punch without getting knocked out.

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Before you ask: No, it doesn't have an adorably perfect food pun for a name. Severed, the next stylish game from Guacamelee studio DrinkBox, won't launch in the summer as planned. The game needs "a few additional months," though the alpha version will definitely be done in a few days. DrinkBox is taking the extra time to go all-in on "play-testing and tuning," the studio says. "We also need sufficient time to add more memes and dumb jokes." In that case, please take all the time you need, DrinkBox.

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Google's Nexus 6

If you've ever wondered why Uber will show you a horde of available cars but still quote you an oddly long wait time for a ride, you now have an explanation: some of those cars don't exist. Motherboard has learned through a study that the app's map activity doesn't correlate that well with reality, even in those areas where you simply can't get a lift. Why? That depends on who you ask. A spokesperson insists that the number and location of cars is "generally accurate," but the company's help staff disagree. One claims that it's a glitch stemming from map zooming, while another says that the cars are purely there for a "visual effect" that indicates the presence of cars looking for fares.

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Google's Nexus 6

Android has more than one video-related security hole on its hands at the moment. Trend Micro has found a flaw that uses a malformed Matroska (MKV) video in apps or websites to crash Android's "mediaserver" service, effectively turning the target device into a paperweight. It'll not only render your phone's interface mostly or completely unresponsive, but silence all calls and notifications. You might not even get past the lock screen, if your phone is locked during the incident. An intruder could take advantage of this seemingly brain-dead state to hold your handset for ransom, threatening to shut you out unless you pay up.

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Hand holding green apple with bite missing isolated on a white background

Researchers from Brown University have made a discovery about how the human brain operates when gripping an object. Previously, it's been assumed that the mind had a short, single command to drive the hand, but in reality it's much more complex than that. With this new information, it's hoped that engineers will be able to build prosthetic limbs that are significantly more responsive. In addition, the finds could also go some way to helping develop new tools for people with severe paralysis.

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Xbox One game streaming on Windows 10

Microsoft has made much ado about Windows 10's support for streaming Xbox One games to your PC, but how do you actually do it? There's a good chance that you can figure it out if you're reading this, but Microsoft has helpfully posted a full walkthrough in case you or your friends need some help. The gist? You'll need both an Xbox One controller and an Xbox Live account, of course, but you'll also need to make sure that the Xbox One is set to allow game streaming in the first place. We could see that easily becoming a stumbling block if you're rushing to get started. The guide is also a friendly reminder of what you can do once everything is working, such as voice chat (with a microphone) and controlling the Xbox One's menus. It's simple enough... let's just hope that PC-to-Xbox streaming isn't any more complex.

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