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Lionsgate and two long-time Marvel producers are working on a Borderlands movie and, no, it's not called Mad Max. Lionsgate is the production company behind Twilight, The Hunger Games, Ender's Game, Warm Bodies and tons of other mainstream flicks, while producers Ari and Avi Arad have worked on the Iron Man, X-Men, Spider-Man and Amazing Spider-Man franchises. Borderlands is a massively popular sci-fi action series that debuted in 2009 under the direction of Gearbox Software and Take-Two Interactive. It takes place on Pandora, an abandoned mining planet, and the games involve crass humor, alien beasts, a class-based RPG system a ridiculous number of guns (16 million, in fact).

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Drones are playing an ever-expanding role in modern warfare, so it's no surprise companies like Boeing are developing news ways to shoot them out of the sky. Its last laser was the High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HEL MD) -- a huge weapon mounted to the top of a truck -- and now it's touting something more portable. The Compact Laser Weapons System fits in four suitcase-sized boxes and can be mounted onto a tripod. It looks like a giant camera and, like the HEL MD, uses an Xbox 360 controller for targeting. As soon as you're in range though, the system can automatically take over and track the UAV, making sure you get a clean shot. Wired reports that, in one of Boeing's demos, it only took two seconds at full power to set a drone aflame.

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We've already been introduced to the world of Lawbreakers, the next shooter from the Gears of War creator Cliff Bleszinski, but now we've got our first look at some actual gameplay. And while the science behind the game's setting may be suspect (it's a fantastical take on Earth after we've blown up the moon), the game's mechanics seem solid. It's a class-based multiplayer shooter, similar to Titanfall and Team Fortress, that will also be free-to-play on a variety of platforms (we still don't have specifics). The trailer introduces some of those classes (and their respective characters): there's the swift Assassin Kitsune, who can double-jump; Breacher, a gunner who has the unique ability to shoot behind him; and a jetpack-wielding Skirmisher named Maverick. One character, a Titan named Cronos, can also rocket-jump, bringing back fond memories of Bleszinski's work on Unreal Tournament. Judging from this trailer, Lawbreakers looks like plenty of other shooters, but its unique take on character classes and Bleszinski's pedigree make it one to keep an eye on.

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The Pentagon

The Pentagon wants to use wearables for more than just tracking steps. It's pouring $75 million over the next five years into the FlexTech Alliance -- a group made of 162 separate organizations, including Apple, Boeing and Harvard -- to create a "Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Flexible Hybrid Electronics." That may sound like a mouthful, but basically it will explore new ways soldiers can use advanced wearable tech. The findings could even make their way to military ships and aircrafts to monitor their structural integrity in realtime, Reuters reports. Additional funding from other companies and local governments will bring the total investment of the project up to $171 million. "I've been pushing the Pentagon to think outside our five-sided box and invest in innovation here in Silicon Valley and in tech communities across the country," US Defense Secretary Ash Carter said in a statement today. "Now we're taking another step forward."

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Huawei may have accidentally revealed that its Android Wear Watch will cost as much as $799.99 and be compatible with iOS. Earlier today, the company teased a September 2nd arrival at IFA 2015 via Twitter, but a tipster pointed us to a legit-looking Amazon listing that shows four flavors of the wearable. The basic version in stainless steel starts at $349.99 with a leather strap, but the highest-end model in gold-plated stainless steel goes for $799.99, making it one of the pricier Android Wear devices out there. Intriguingly, the listing also mentions that the Watch is compatible with iOS 8.2 or later devices.

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Hasbro is hoping you'd be willing to share your best party game idea ever(!) with the company and has launched a search for the "Next Great Game." The mechanics are simple: just go to the project website and submit an entry -- along the same lines as Monopoly, some variants of Trivial Pursuit and Funny or Die -- until September 30th, 2015. After that, sit back, cross your fingers and hope that you're among the five finalists announced on October 30th. Now, here's the twist: you're not getting any prize money even if you end up as one of the five. Instead, you'll be invited to launch an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for your concept.

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Ashley Madison

Noel Biderman, the CEO of Avid Life Media, the company behind the extra-marital dating site Ashley Madison, is stepping down from his position "in mutual agreement with the company." In a statement released today, Avid says Noel Biderman the change "is in the best interest of the company." The decision comes after the site was hacked, revealing the identity of millions of potentially infidelious members.

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Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime was a hit in 2013 when it was just a multiplayer, neon-streaked demo mixed in with all of the nominated, blockbuster indie titles at the Independent Games Festival. Lovers was up for an award in Visual Art, and even though it lost to Kentucky Route Zero, the nomination was enough to create buzz around the game and its studio, Asteroid Base. At the time, co-creator Jamie Tucker felt confident that Lovers would be done within the year. Now, two years later, Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime is set to debut on Xbox One and Steam on September 9th. Yes, in 2015. We asked Tucker via email what happened with Lovers' development timeline and he broke it all down -- including details that offer a glimpse at the real rigors and lucky breaks of game development.

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Microphone

Last week, the internet was awash with journalists' interpretations of Spotify's new privacy policy. Depending on whom you ask, the policy was eerie, creepy or just downright atrocious. While Spotify scrambled to reassure us that it wasn't really interested in snooping through your photos or tracking your every move, people publicly quit the service, argued with its CEO and generally hated on the company. Such public outcries are now commonplace. But what is it about the industry that evokes such an endemic distrust? Why are we so quick to believe they're out to do us harm? Aaron Souppouris and Devindra Hardawar try to get the bottom of the matter. Or at least argue about it.

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top of a windmill on blue sky

Researchers have completed a novel study that may help the wind farm industry avoid protected golden eagle habitats. Wind turbine blades kill up to 100,000 birds per year, which is admittedly a small percentage compared to those killed by your cat. Still, the golden eagle is particularly susceptible, considering that around 100 individuals were killed last year by a single wind farm in Altamont, California -- and there are only 500 breeding pairs in the state. The new study posits a simple idea: Why not plot both golden eagle habitats and the areas with the best wind farm potential, and make sure the areas don't intersect?

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