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day4bananafish

Apple's iOS 7 is finally here and it's different, how do you feel about it?



Apple has finally announced iOS 7 at WWDC today and it's certainly a stark change from the previous 6 versions. It's cleaner, flatter, and more colorful from the lock screen to the notifications menu. However, the changes are more than skin deep; iOS 7 is modernizing functionality as well.

The Look

The new iOS is flatter. Somewhere between Jelly Bean and Windows Phone, iOS has done away with skeuomorphism completely in favor of flat backgrounds and primary colors. There is also a pseudo-3D effect on the homescreen that gives shifts when you tilt your phone.

Quick Settings

Like the pull down menus on Jelly Bean, Apple has fleshed out its quick settings by including controls for WiFi, Bluetooth, Airplane Mode, Do Not Disturb, and orientation lock. All are accessed on an extended menu which swipes up from the bottom of the screen allowing users to bypass diving into the phone settings.

Multitasking

Multitasking is now more fleshed out giving you a more card-like view of different apps which are currently running allowing you to quickly swipe left and right through them.

iTunes Radio

Joining the ranks of Pandora, Spotify, Rdio and other streaming music services, Apple also showed off the new iTunes Radio. The service is free and ad supported though with an iTunes Match subscription you can be ad free. It operates like the genius playlists, building a "station" based on songs you like and gives you the option to like, skip and buy songs that show up.

And the rest...

Apple has updated all of their core apps visually and added some new functionality to old standards like the Calendar, Game Center, App Store, as well as some improvements to Siri. They also introduced new Siri car integration with a slew of different automakers joining in at the launch. Also, the lock screen has been given a more contemporary look as well as some added security features.

The new iOS will be released in the fall so there will be plenty of time to analyze the new changes. The question is, are you impressed with what they showed off? Do you like the new look? Will iOS 7 keep you from jumping ship to Android or has it pushed you away?

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40 replies
cgrdlmn

i like an i can't wait
0 like dislike
kevinlauer

The new icon set looks terrible. The flat design looks, well, exactly that. flat. Why on earth do you go around for years touting this high-res "retina" display and the processing capabilities, just to throw all those beautiful hi res icons out the window for these childish looking things I could have any five year old make in MS Paint? They made it geometrical? Whoop-de-do. I'm a big fan of apple's products, and I've yet to buy an android handset because i think their home screens look crowded and unrefined. And now apple just decided to throw out what they're good at for no particularly good reason I can think of other than needing to convince themselves they're not paying their graphic designers to just sit around. The flat look is an especially odd contrast to the beautiful addition of parallax backgrounds. And I can't possibly imagine most other app developers wanting to climb the ugly tree with Apple and update their icons, so we'll have a bunch of nicely rendered 3rd party icons sitting next to the flat gradient rainbow of the iOS icons.

I'm also quite turned off by the idea of automatic app updates. Great if it's there, terrible if I don't have the option to turn it off. On the surface it sounds good for those that are busy or just lazy, and it keeps developers happy because it quickly gets people on board with the latest version of their app, but I can already see inherent flaws in this idea. For one thing, while 93% of the install base might have the latest version of iOS, they won't all have the same phone/tablet and processing capabilities. And for developers that want to push the limit, those on older hardware might find serious performance issues with later app updates. The other issue that comes into play is that not all developers have the same software lifecycle process, or even a process at all in many cases. For a number of apps, their idea of 'testing' the app is to push it out to production and wait to see who complains. If facebook pushes an app update without thorough testing, and instead of the 20,000 people who are always installing the latest and greatest, but 20 million users suddenly find their app crashing every 2 minutes, "Automagically"...there's going to be blood in the water, especially since iOS has no graceful way for back-revving an app if the developer breaks it. This could quickly mean thousands of users changing their reviews in the appstore for an otherwise solid app from Crazy Awesome to Craptastic! in a matter of a couple hours or days, before the developer has a chance to correct their mistake. And someone will argue that they test beforehand, but everyone knows there's no substitute for the stress test of the real world. There are a lot of app developers that have a less than stellar implementation of their preferred software methodology, if they even have one at all. So while a great Agile house might catch things in time to fix it quickly enough, a RAD team will throw out a quick band-aid instead of something solid, and a Waterfall house will be in planning meetings while their customers walk away. Sorry, long rant for a small tweak, but I also feel like making it seamless makes users more vulnerable. The less you know what's going on underneath, the less you can keep yourself from getting hurt by people with less scruples than yourself. Being blissfully unaware might feel nice in the short term, but it won't keep you from getting screwed. Here's a perfect example - only a year ago, from a (arguably) well-respected leader in antivirus software - www.symantec.com­/connect­/blogs­/summary­-july­-11­-201...

On the upside, longer battery life is always welcome. And it will be nice to be able to organize photos right on the device finally. *Shrugs*
0 like dislike
jrvelezb

WAITING TO USE THIS NEW iOS!
-1 like dislike
bouvi

It is nice but buggie crashed twice on me in 3 days not bad but had to to do a hard restart on my phone the 2nd time it happened I do like it a lot and it should be great after its released
0 like dislike
falleninsea

i would imagine this 1st beta is buggier than when iOS 6 came out. Heck, apple didn't even have a beta for the iPad ready for WWDC this year. i imagine they were in a hurry to get out what they were able to in time for the keynote.

I am curious though if there will be any major changes of features between now and the final release of the software. I'm curious to see how it runs on the iPad mini.
0 like dislike
Met

Of course that's expected. There's a reason it's not available to the public. You should not use this on your primary phone. As a beta, this should only be used by developers trying to make use of the new APIs in the their own apps. It's even still beta 1, meaning it's barely ready for even developers to take a look at.
3 like dislike
Dawagner1

Not sure about the flatter comment. The icons may look a little flatter without the shading, however, the overall look and feel is anything but flat.
0 like dislike
Met

They mean flatter images and graphics, but they also heavily rely on multi-layering for things like the keyboard or Control Center overlaying your app.
0 like dislike
oliversl

Just hate the new design. They are making fun of current iOS users, they want us to relearn how to use the phone, they are following Microsoft flat design. Just for the unlock screen I condemn them. Won't upgrade until I'm being force to.

Also, Apple is ending the Fan Boy wars, because Apple validated Android and Windows Phone design.
-1 like dislike
peterzhu2118

My (horrible) IPad 2 is still at IOS 4.3.3 :)
0 like dislike
joaquindes97

Just Wow! I'm amazed of the new iOS 7. It is awesome. At first when i heard it would be similar to windows phone i was a bit dissapointed, but not! Apple still keeps its insignia design but now remixed and better. I just can't wait to download the iOS 7 on my iPhone
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jrvelezb

When can it be downloaded
0 like dislike
Met

Some time in the range of Aug to Oct, when the next iPhone gets released.
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garen

I think it is a badly implemented flat design. For most of the part of the OS it is not flat though....
3 like dislike
Jory

I'm just wondering whether / how soon Microsoft and Google will sue Apple over iOS 7. I wouldn't shed a tear.
0 like dislike
Met

Apple does things the careful way. Everyone instantly bashed Apple and begged for them to get sued when they added the Notifications Blind. Apple is too careful to implement such a big rip off knowing they could get sued. And now again, I'm pretty sure they won't get sued.
1 like dislike
Met

Now with features like the real multitasking, I think it's finally a smartphone OS I'd consider. I was never really happy with an iPhone due to the limitations of not having the multitasking.
iOS 7 is not enough to get me to abandon my true love, Android. However, I think I may finally abandon Windows Phone (still on Windows Phone 7) on my secondary phone in favor of an iPhone (5S?).
0 like dislike
higaara

Overall, I'm very impressed with the changes. It's quite different, but it's still recognizably iOS. There's lots of "inspiration" from other OS'es but they've done a good job of remixing and making it their own.

From a developer standpoint, there's a lot of work to do. I work at a mobile development shop, and we're all voraciously watching the WWDC session videos, learning as much as we can. There's a TON of new stuff for developers.
5 like dislike
citizen782

So when Apple copies another manufacturer it's "inspiration". When someone redesigns and incorporates Apple it's patent infringement and a lawsuit. How cute.
3 like dislike
cass

Would you be able to shine some light on some of the new stuff you can do that trickles down to the consumer? As a non-developer, I'm curious!
0 like dislike
higaara

I can't talk about a lot because I'm under an NDA. However I can point you in the right direction. Find a demo of the photos app. I think Apples website has one. Notice the zooming in transitions on moments and individual photos. This kind of depth is used throughout the operating system and I expect to see it a lot more in third party apps. In fact depth is probably the defining theme throughout iOS 7. Notice how it zooms into icons when you open an app or the parallax effect that allows you to "see behind" UI elements on screen.
3 like dislike
rcereghino

I used to have a webOS Pre2, and I'm really happy to see multitasking ala card switching!!! Very excited about that. Also happy and eager to have a fresh OS after "seeing" the same aesthetic from iPhone 1.

My only wish setting would be to able to accelerate animations without having to jailbreak.
0 like dislike
cass

My first impressions based purely on what I saw during the keynote are positive overall, though I wasn't blown away by any means. I already enjoy using iOS 6 and now 7 is adding some new, useful features (yes, some of which you can already do on Android) is definitely welcome. Maybe it'll be different when I get my hands on it, but at this point I don't see this update significantly improving my experience with my iPhone, but like any gadget lover, I look forward to tinkering with the newest stuff.
0 like dislike
dbreuning

It's a little getting used to but it looks very good. People who complain that Android already had these features are missing the point. The main mobile OS people develop for and support is iOS. iOS started the smartphone revolution if you like it or not.

Now iOS is catching up a little in terms of features and opening up more and more will be possible. For what it's worth: because of the strict control and curation it works so well.
0 like dislike
citizen782

Guess what genius: As of October 2012 Google Play and iTunes had the same number of apps available for download. The myth that "The main mobile OS people develop for and support is iOS" is in your head. There are more Android handsets in circulation worldwide than iPhones. Another fact you ignore or dismiss that removes all credibility from your app myth.
-1 like dislike
Met

It's not about number of apps, it's about quality of apps. It's also about where the major ones go first. How many apps and games make it to iOS waaaaaaay before Android? Also, there's a ton more garbage apps on Android than iOS. I've been a long term user of both (Android for phone, iOS for tablet) and I really see that. As an Android fanboy, I target Android first with my apps, but most other developers don't.

Also, both your points are moot since he never mentioned anything about the number of apps, nor number of devices. He wasn't arguing either point, or at least didn't do so directly.
1 like dislike
sK0pe

You seem quite disillusioned. Like most Apple users you don't understand where the product idea came from. I and my class mates were using smart phones and PDA's years before the iPhone was released, it was also a very flawed and limited device, similar to today however their marketing department has to be commended on brain washing the feeble minded buyers in the world. Strict curation and control is how Apple Macintosh died. The same is happening to Apple at the moment but their back tracking is too late. How are you enjoying the change in physical interface?
-3 like dislike
dbreuning

I of course know where the idea came from. Even Steve himself said it when introducing. They didn't invent it but they re-imagined it. It started a new breed of smartphones. You can't deny that. Saying it would've evolved that way naturally is too easy.

But to each its own. I like what they are doing and iOS is still the dominant mobile OS. Maybe not in sales or market share but certainly in use and visibility.
5 like dislike
Jory

How could it not be dominant in market share but be dominant in use?
0 like dislike
falleninsea

my guess at this would be because more people use the features of the phone than some of the other android phones. there are tons of phones coming out with android but if people choose not to use the market ,or the browser or just choose to use it as a smart phone it still counts as a sale an a count toward market domination but not towards use if the person just chooses the use the phone as a phone.

personally that seems to be a waste of a good device but not all phones are iPhones, Galaxy modes or HTC ones. And with Android being a fairly low cost OS to install on a device i can see manufactures choosing to use it on their low end devices over developing something in house and just not giving them a lot addition features.
1 like dislike
dbreuning

See Met's reply. I mean sales do not equal use all the time. You can buy something and then stow it away, not use it at all or just use it for an app here and there and that's it. What Apple says is that they see that their customers use it for a whole lot of things so it's popular though they don't have the #1 spot in the market.
0 like dislike
Met

Yeah, he gave a few examples to prove his point of usage. He used some web traffic percentages and he mentioned the online sales on Black Friday. There might've been others, but I can't think of them off the top of my head.

While I disagree with the "usage" comment, as a developer, I would still DEFINITELY prioritize iOS over Android. There are so many free alternatives to everything on Android and piracy is significantly easier. As a result, Android users are a lot less willing to pay for apps than iOS users.

I've been using Android for a lot longer and have not yet spent even $10 on the Play Store. However, on my iPad, I've spent at least $300.
2 like dislike
Jory

Very interesting point. That would indicate that, as a user, you get the same functionality on Android for free (perhaps ad supported?) that you have to pay for on iOS, assuming the functionality is available for both platforms. That seems like a significant advantage for the Android platform, despite making it harder or more complicated for the developers to make money. And though Android might usually not be targeted *first*, if it gets its own (high quality) versions of the applications soon after iOS, that's not a big deal.
0 like dislike
Met

All of what you said is true, minus the own versions of the applications soon part. Some apps take months, even years to get ported, if ever. This is especially the case with games.

Also, the "more complicated for the developers to make money" doesn't take games into consideration. Games require a lot of time and effort, thus require A LOT of money. If they can't make enough money, the game may not be ported.
0 like dislike
Met

According to Tim Cook, both in the WWDC keynote and the AllThingsD conference the week before, (paraphrasing) the experience for doing some of these tasks is so much better on an iPhone that people end up doing them more there than on an Android.
One example they gave, was number of online purchases done on Black Friday, the most important day of retail in the US. People using iPads and people using iPhones each made significantly more purchases than all of Android users combined! Making sales via iOS 2-3 times more than those via Android...
1 like dislike
TgD

I can't wait to give this a try on my iPod touch
0 like dislike
peterzhu2118

Android copy cat.... LONG LIVE ANDROID
-3 like dislike
sK0pe

Nice write up. Just highlights that Apple is always just catching up and copying elements of the OS which were sorely lacking. Unlike Apple however I doubt Microsoft and Google are contacting their lawyers immediately. Left the 4S and went for a Samsung Galaxy S4, vanilla Android.
0 like dislike
Cupajo

Yeah, I really enjoyed this iOS feature-set...a year and a half ago when it was called Ice Cream Sandwich.
-1 like dislike
imariopereira

Perfect! :)
1 like dislike
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