While NAB is all about high-end cameras and workflow solutions for broadcast professionals, the show is a great opportunity to talk about industry policy as well. Yesterday, NAB President Gordon Smith criticized the FCC for "favoring broadband over the broadcast industry," and today FCC head Tom Wheeler took the stage to address a broadcast-heavy crowd. In his one-hour talk, he touched on the importance of competition and the FCC's role in carrying out the US Senate's mandates, but the most interesting moments came when Wheeler lectured broadcast licensees on their need to adapt and change. "Lecture" may be putting it lightly, though; the implication in Wheeler's remarks was that broadcast companies haven't evolved as quickly as services like Netflix, and that there's some serious catching up to do.

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At just £10, Sky's Now TV box is pretty good value for money as is. The idea, of course, is that cash continues to flow in Sky's direction by means of the film, TV and sport subscription packages, but there's nothing to stop you from forking out the hardware fee and using it simply as a window to BBC iPlayer, 4OD and other free services. Understandably, the selection of channels is limited -- Sky would prefer you use the box for its paid content -- but with only a few minutes of tinkering, you can easily turn your Now TV into a robust network media player capable of pulling video and audio from your personal network and several internet sources. You see, Sky's hardware is basically a re-branded Roku LT player with a heavily curated app store, but as long as you have the correct file, you can push apps to a Now TV box that otherwise shouldn't be there. Being able to run software like Plex immediately makes the cheap set-top box an even more compelling proposition, and better yet, side-loading apps couldn't be much easier.

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It's our 10th birthday, and to celebrate we'll be revisiting some of the key devices of the last decade. So please be kind, rewind.

Sony may not have been at the forefront of the digital music revolution, but when it came to e-books and e-readers, the company was certainly a pioneer. It all started in the '90s with Sony's first chunky, flip-topped Data Discman. This two-pound, paperback-sized player came bundled with a selection of reference books on disc, each capable of storing up to 100,000 pages of digital text. When that cumbersome early e-book solution failed to gain traction, Sony went right back to the drawing board and returned in 2004 with the Japan-only LIBRIé e-reader. This particular device used an innovative E Ink display and relied on an e-book loan program -- a distribution model that proved unpopular with consumers at the time.

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"I would not do it again because there's nothing else to accomplish ... The fact that it worked once, does not mean it will work again."

Felix Baumgartner is a rock star. At least, he is to the bright-eyed group of tween boys crowding his Red Bull Stratos exhibit at the Smithsonian, the pieces of which are now set to become part of the museum's permanent collection. Baumgartner could also probably be an action movie star. He's brimming with braggadocio in that way only men who've dared and triumphed over the impossible can be; ruggedly handsome in a way you wouldn't expect from a daredevil. And he's also very stylish.

Baumgartner refers to himself as the "fastest man in the sky," and the distinction is well-earned. In October of 2012, the Austrian stepped out from a custom-made space capsule 24 miles high and space dove toward terra firma, breaking the sound barrier along the way. As you might imagine, a free fall from the edge of space is not without significant risks. "I heard a lot of nightmare stories about flat spinning," he told me. "Which, if it happens too fast, you're facing too many RPMs; you cannot stop that spin anymore. And, at a certain point, the blood has only one way to leave your body and that's through ... your eyeballs. That means you're gonna die."

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When HTC developed the new HTC One (M8) it knew it had a dilemma. If it played it safe, and did a general all-round specification bump, it risked underwhelming the public. Conversely, by over-cooking things, and innovating for innovation's sake, it could saddle the phone with software gimmicks and unnecessary hardware additions. It ultimately attempted to land on that thin strip of middle ground. We've already covered the return of the Ultrapixel, that new duo camera, and the latest version of Sense in our review. Potentially, though, it's the low-profile "Smart Sensor hub" that might prove to be the dark horse -- not just for HTC, but for Android, and smartphones as a whole. The new Smart Sensors are what enable the LG-like tap-to-unlock feature, and all those other fancy wake gestures (covered in the review) while the phone is in standby. The cool part being that HTC has given developers access to these sensors for their own projects. Fitbit was the first app to make deliberate use of it, but who will it benefit in the long run?

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Opening Week is upon us and Major League Baseball teams have already started their quest to win this season's World Series, while fans all over gear up for what will hopefully be a very exciting year. And for those who can't make it to the ballpark on a regular basis, keeping up with their favorite team has become a relatively easy feat. A few weeks ago, the MLB, NBA, NHL and others struck a partnership with Time Inc. to launch 120 Sports, with the idea being to provide an online hub that delivers sports video content in a timely manner and across different platforms. This announcement came shortly after the introduction of NFL Now, an all-new digital network that aims to immerse football fans in the ultimate viewing experience -- there will be full on-demand games, highlights, analysis and a lot more to watch.

Both initiatives signal how American sports leagues are adapting to the times by introducing viewing experiences that aren't necessarily tied to being at home. Not everyone will be satisfied with the way the content is delivered, but it's worth acknowledging that leagues like the NFL, NBA and MLB are going the extra mile to try to give people what they want.

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In the heart of Stockholm a team of designers and engineers have been hard at work, mostly in secret, overhauling one of biggest names in music. (And no, we're not talking about Icona Pop or even an ABBA reunion.) On Birger Jarlsgatan, a street that divides the neighborhoods of Ostermalm and Norrmalm in the Swedish capital, sits the home of Spotify. Not all that long ago it was the undisputed king of subscription music services. Today it is just one of many major players in the exploding marketplace with would-be usurpers, from Google to Beats, surrounding it on all sides.

Over the years it's shoehorned in new features and accelerated its international expansion, but the design stagnated. Its iTunes-like desktop client didn't just look dated, it was cumbersome and many of its features bordered on obsolete. Its mobile apps and web player filled a need, but lacked the polish and stability many mainstream customers demanded. So for the last several months a team led by Michelle Kadir (Director of Product Development) and Andreas Holmstrom (Lead Communications Designer) have been toiling away to bring Spotify into the 2010s. That means a flatter more playful look with soft edges and large images. But the company also bucked the trend towards lighter color palettes by slathering its UI with enough black to make Tomas Skogsberg proud.

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Those of you with the appropriate geek cred know the score by now. Every year on April 1st, ThinkGeek, purveyor of nerdy novelty delights, takes part in the "I fooled you, internets" game. But unlike other April Fools' pranksters, ThinkGeek's products have a shot at becoming more than just joke fodder; they sometimes become real. Okay, so maybe the spray-on facial hair power of Mr. Beard up there is a bit of a stretch. (But hey, once upon a time, so was the idea of spray-on tans.)

Join us after the break then for a whimsical walk through ThinkGeek's 2014 April Fools' lineup.

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Snow was falling in the form of those soft white, potato-flake chunks you usually see in films. I'd barely finished my morning cup of coffee and without that crucial mental aid, I was having a hard time finding the entrance to ThinkGeek's ranch-style headquarters in Fairfax, Va. In the blur of 8:57 AM on a Tuesday in this winter-like spring, every window of the sprawling complex looked like a door to me. So I chose one and, miraculously, was spotted by Chris Mindel, a senior buyer for the company, who let me and my videographer inside the toy-filled halls. It was then I noticed the sign on the open door and burst out laughing. It read: "This is not the door you're looking for."

I'd had Willy Wonka on the brain before, but it was clear now I needed to switch, or at least integrate, gears. This was well-informed geek territory I was treading upon -- hallowed Star Wars-quoting superfan territory -- and I'd just been granted a one-day golden ticket to explore it.

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It's our 10th birthday, and to celebrate we'll be revisiting some of the key devices of the last decade. So please be kind, rewind.

A company called Sling Media burst onto the scene in 2005 with a relatively new idea: give customers the ability to access their home cable and video services while they're traveling. Its "place-shifting" concept was embodied in its first device: the Slingbox. While you're on the road, this set-top-like box served to connect you to your very own TiVo recorded shows, media PC or cable and satellite TV services, provided you had a computer with Sling Media's software and an internet connection (preferably high-speed). The original design was somewhat unique, resembling an oversized candy bar (Sling calls it an "ingot"), and it was a clear favorite of both Engadget editors and readers, earning the title of best home entertainment device for 2005. At launch, the $250 price certainly wasn't cheap -- especially for standard definition only -- and it was markedly Windows-centric, excluding Apple users until its Mac compatible software arrived around 2007.

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