The best iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus battery cases

This post was done in partnership with The Wirecutter, a list of the best technology to buy. Read the full article below at TheWirecutter.com.

We've spent more than 140 hours testing 21 different battery cases (18 for the iPhone 6 and three for the iPhone 6 Plus), and we think the best battery case for most people is Anker's Ultra Slim Extended Battery Case. It provides an above-average 117 percent of a full charge to the iPhone 6one full charge plus another 17 percentand at only $40, it's by far the least expensive. The result is the highest ratio of charge percent per dollar and the lowest cost per full iPhone recharge out of all the models we looked at. It's also the lightest and thinnest battery case we tested.

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The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, a massive, open-world, role-playing game from Polish studio CD Projekt Red, has sold 4 million copies in two weeks across PlayStation 4, PC and Xbox One. Those aren't Grand Theft Auto V numbers, but it's a huge milestone for the developer, whose cult classic games have typically launched on PC first with console versions coming much later, if at all. The Witcher 3 has also been a critical success, too, with an aggregate review score of 93 on Metacritic ("universal acclaim" according to the site) for the PS4 version, 94 for PC and 91 on Xbox One. Since its May launch, the game has received four software patches on consoles and five on PC. These updates have ranged from minor things like adding lethal cows to address a money-generating exploit, to major issues like save-file corruption and endless saved-game loops on the Xbox One edition.

While almost everyone I've talked to who's playing the very Game of Thrones-esque The Witcher 3 loves it and hasn't had any problems, I can't say the same for myself. Four software updates later, and the latest patch notes still list "fixes" 52 times.

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Casio might be only lightly involving itself in the current boom in smartwatches and wearables, but the company still makes plenty of money from its G-Shock series and rugged outdoor watches. That's not to say it hasn't experienced a combination of hits and misses: Casio would say it "pioneered" a huge array of features in its digital watches over the decades, many of which have returned -- in a more appealing or functional form -- in smartwatches today. It crammed GPS into a watch in 1999, lashed a rumble-pack to its early gaming watch and even made a waterproof watch that warns you've been out in the sun too long. And that's just the beginning. Smartwatches may be capable of much more, but credit is due for how Casio was tackling these features decades (too) early. Niche? Yes. Fascinating? You bet.

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Leica's been relatively quiet since Photokina 2014, where it revealed a full set of cameras for every different budget and taste. Today, though, the German manufacturer is stepping out of the shadows and introducing the Leica Q, a beautiful small camera with some powerful attributes. It features a 24-megapixel, full-frame CMOS sensor, an ISO range of up to 50,000, a 3-inch, 1.04 million-dot LCD screen, NFC, WiFi and 1080p video-recording at 30 or 60 fps. Leica says the sensor powering the Q was custom built for it, designed to work perfectly in conjunction with the Summilux 28mm f/1.7 fixed lens. Like with most of the company's cameras, however, you'll have to break the bank to own one of these. The Leica Q is available now for a cool $4,250 -- which, if it helps, does include a free copy of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 6.

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It's been awhile since I've spent much time with Apogee's audio gear. In my early Engadget days, I reviewed both the Jam and MiC, two portable recording accessories that turned the iPad into a tracking center for guitars, vocals and podcasts. Earlier this year, the company revealed the Groove, putting years of pro audio experience to work improving subpar headphone audio. The diminutive metal device sits comfortably between your go-to headphones and laptop, providing a massive sound boost despite being about as small as a pack of gum. So, what's the catch? Well, if you're familiar with Apogee, you know its gear isn't cheap. Does the Groove provide enough oomph to warrant its $300 price tag? That depends on your listening habits.

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Samsung's NX500, introduced earlier this year, is basically a smaller version of its NX1 flagship mirrorless camera. The main difference between them is their look, although the top model does feature better continuous shooting and shutter speeds. Inside, the NX500 packs the same APS-C, 28-megapixel sensor as its bigger sibling, along with a DRIMe Vs image processor, an ISO range of up to 51,200, NFC, WiFi and a 3-inch, tilting Super AMOLED screen. It can also shoot 4K video at 24 (4,096 x 2,160) and 30 fps (3,840 x 2,160), making it a decent future-proof option for anyone who wants to record higher resolutions than 720 or 1080p.

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Google's Android Open Source Project (AOSP) rolled out in 2007 with the goal of creating a unified framework for mobile operating systems and, in turn, expediting the development of mobile products. The core of the code was open to everyone, but to help guarantee quality products -- and promote its own services in the face of Apple's iOS -- Google also organized the Open Handset Alliance (OHA). Companies who pledged allegiance to this group effectively committed to certain standards of quality for any resultant Android hardware and software. Membership in the OHA, however, is not a requirement for AOSP and so numerous forked (read: compatible and non-compatible) versions, like Amazon's Fire OS, have been developed over the years. We've pinpointed just a few of these to highlight the vibrant -- and often political -- undercurrent of Android's alternate identities.

You take the good, you take the bad, you take them both and there you have: the forks of Android life.

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Engadget Cooking With Watson

Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson is a collaboration between IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education in New York City. Once a week, as part of an ongoing series, we'll be preparing one recipe from the book until we've made all of them. Wish us luck.

Watson's latest challenge to my self-esteem and sanity, the Spanish almond crescent, is the first dessert in the Cognitive Cooking book. And it's an incredibly challenging one. But, I'll say this up front, if you put in the effort, the payoff is well worth it. These pastries are quite unique and delicious. They're not so surprising that the first bite catches you off guard, like say last week's Swiss-Thai asparagus quiche. But that's a good thing. These little puffs of sweet and savory are different, but approachable; unfamiliar, but comforting.

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For such a quiet tech show, this week's Computex in Taiwan may have been a watershed moment that will affect nearly every PC, phone and tablet you'll see in the next few years, if not decade. The new USB Type-C port may have debuted on flagship devices like Apple's single-port new Macbook and Google's Chromebook Pixel, but the new, smaller, reversible kind of USB is shaping up to be the connector of the future. This week ASUS joined the USB-C party, and in a reassuring vote of confidence, Intel announced that its newest iteration of Thunderbolt will take the same shape. Thunderbolt 3.0 will, at a minimum, double the data speed found on USB-C cables. It might not work wirelessly just yet, but the single-cable future is coming. However, change isn't always easy.

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This post was done in partnership with The Sweethome, a list of the best gear for your home. Read the original full article at TheSweethome.com

For small spills and tight spots that a regular vacuum can't reach, we recommend using the Black & Decker BDH2020FLFH 20 V MAX Flex Vac ($130). Its powerful 20-volt lithium-ion battery delivers about 16 minutes of strong, steady suction, which means better cleaning for longer than most of the competition can muster. Equally important, its 4-foot flexible hose reaches where other hand vacuums can't, like under car seats. And it even accepts clip-on attachments like a regular vacuum would. We spent 56 hours researching and 20 hours testing handheld vacuums over the past few years and the Flex Vac has proven to be the most versatile portable vacuum out there.

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Nintendo may have quashed rumors that its next-generation "NX" console will run Android, but that isn't enough to stop the speculators. After all, the company has a history of denials that weren't entirely forthright. Remember how the console maker downplayed talk of a supersized 3DS in early June 2012, only to announce that very device weeks later? Yeah. Whomever you believe, the scuttlebutt raises a big question: Just what would Nintendo do with Android? Would it see much of a benefit versus handling everything in-house? If Amazon's experience building a heavily customized version of Android is any indication, the answer is yes -- but it wouldn't be the cure-all that you might hope for.

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ESPN is never afraid to experiment with new technologies. Earlier this year, it used drones to capture footage of athletes as they performed during the winter X Games in Aspen, Colorado. That recorded content, however, was limited to being used for replays or post-show highlights, if at all. But, over the past few months, ESPN has been working with GoPro to bring a new, real-time camera angle to its broadcast of this year's summer X Games, scheduled to take place in Austin, Texas from June 4th to June 7th. For the first time ever, the sports network will be using video from GoPros in live broadcasts of the event, giving viewers at home a first-person look at the action while it happens.

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