The first-ever College Football Playoff National Championship game, between Ohio State and Oregon, took place yesterday at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, and we were there to see it unfold. As you likely know by now, the Buckeyes triumphed over the Ducks with an impressive score of 42-20, taking home the biggest prize of the night -- in what will always be remembered as the first title to come from the newly adopted playoff system. There was so much technology at the event too, which isn't surprising given the fact it took place in the home of America's Team (or America's most hated team), the Dallas Cowboys. Some people refer to it as, "Jerry's World."

0 Comments

Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green.

High-speed rail projects have been slow to catch on in the United States, but that could change now that the nation's first high-speed rail line has officially broken ground in California. When it's completed, the rail line will link San Francisco and Los Angeles, and it will travel at more than 220 miles per hour. In other green transportation news, Mercedes-Benz just unveiled its futuristic concept for a self-driving, hydrogen-powered car at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The car uses a series of cameras, ultrasonic sensors and radar to drive without any intervention from passengers.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Meet the company that brought 'Ebola' to CES

Every year, CES manages to bring thousands of exhibitors to Las Vegas, spreading them across the Las Vegas Convention Center and throughout hotels like Mandalay Bay, Sands Expo and The Mirage. For members of the media, the abundance of companies at the show makes the task of keeping up with every one of them extremely hard -- but it must be done. Exhibitors, on the other hand, have to reach out to journalists and host press conferences in hopes of getting valuable airtime for their product, whatever it may be. Naturally, due to the madness that is CES, smaller companies have to get creative to compete for attention with the tech giants of the world, such as Samsung, LG, Sony and more. And it helps tremendously if their product is, you know, actually good.

So, when we got an email with a subject line that said, "WakaWaka Brings Ebola To CES," we instantly took notice. According to recent statistics, Ebola is estimated to have infected more than 20,000 people worldwide, the majority of them in West Africa. To date, the deadly virus has taken roughly 8,000 lives. At first glance, you think, "Are they seriously using a disease for promotional purposes?" Indeed, the company behind it, WakaWaka, wasn't really bringing Ebola to CES, but that's quite a bold way to approach pitching a story to journalists and other CES attendees.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Garmin intros three smartwatches, all of them aimed at sports junkies

When I talk about an industry maturing, I don't mean "getting old" so much as facing a different set of challenges. For instance, a year ago, the wearable and fitness section of CES occupied a few hundred square feet. In 2015, the two categories had taken over almost half of the cavernous Sands Expo hall here in Las Vegas. That means that there are plenty more companies trying to get in on the action, but also that those that make the devices are starting to move beyond just making technology for marathon runners.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Over the past few years, the world of connected automobiles has exploded. Self-driving cars, heads-up displays and in-car infotainment systems have become mainstays of CES and this year was no exception. Join us as we take a visual tour of Mercedes' futuristic F 015 road-ready lounge, Audi's indestructible rear-seat Android tablets and everything in between. This is the wild world of automotive tech at CES 2015.

For more automotive technology and beyond, check out our 2015 CES Field Guide.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Virtual reality is going to the movies and Hollywood's excited about it. Or, at the very least, the execs at 20th Century Fox's specialty division Fox Searchlight are cautiously and thoughtfully wading into the deep end of this new medium. For its film Wild, starring Reese Witherspoon and Laura Dern, the studio has crafted what it's calling a companion VR piece with the help of Montreal-based VR artists/directors Paul Raphaël and Félix Lajeunesse, and it was demoed at CES in Las Vegas this week for select press.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Sure, there are plenty of Ultra HD televisions floating around the Las Vegas Convention Center, but how will you find anything suitably super high-res to play on them? Netflix, Amazon and a few others have started 4K internet delivery, while DirecTV and Comcast also have limited approaches, but sometimes you prefer media you can hold onto. Physical media fans have help on the way in two forms, but the bad news is neither one is ready to launch right now. The Blu-ray Disc Association has confirmed the name of its 4K format (Ultra HD Blu-ray) and many of its capabilities, while the Secure Content Storage Association has its own demo for Ultra HD movies you can download and transfer (almost) at will, with backing from Fox, Warner Bros., Samsung and others.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

While Intel's biggest news at CES this year wasn't a processor or any of the futuristic products it powers, its booth is still packed with eye-pleasing, Edison-packing gadgets. You could take our word for it, or you could check out the 3D-printed prosthetics, robot spider dresses and digitally rendered sand people in the photo and video tours below.

For more from Intel and beyond, check out our 2015 CES Field Guide.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

The most important news from CES 2015 involves hundreds of millions of dollars and a titan in the tech industry. It has its origins in a movement that scarred the latter half of 2014. It's not a gadget. It's not a service. It's not something that's for sale at all, actually.

The most important news at CES 2015 comes from Intel of all places, which announced its Diversity in Technology Initiative on Tuesday evening: an ambitious $300 million investment, intended to "increase the representation of women and underrepresented minorities in the workplace and our industry" through partnerships, hiring and oversight. As Intel CEO Brian Krzanich puts it, "This isn't just good business; this is the right thing to do." For a company that's over 75 percent male, it's about time.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Long before Sling TV was the talk of CES, Samsung was busy boasting about the VCR and, later, the DVD player. Today, its presence at the world's biggest tech show is largely focused on 4K TVs. Curved, bendable, flat -- Samsung's UHD lineup has it all. But there's much more to its sprawling booth. The Korean manufacturer has an equally sprawling product portfolio that includes audio, home automation and mobile devices, among other things. To get an idea of just how much Samsung has to offer, look no further than our photo and video tours below.

For more from Samsung and beyond, check out our 2015 CES Field Guide.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments