This post was done in partnership with The Sweethome, a list of the best gear for your home. Read the full article at TheSweethome.com.

After pushing almost 25 pounds of leafy, crunchy, pulpy produce through nine top machines, we think the Tribest Slowstar ($380) is the best and most versatile juicer for the home. Its single vertical auger turns at a slow 47 rpm, making it one of the slowest juicers available -- key for getting maximum nutrients and enzymes from produce -- and it still yielded more juice than nearly every other model we tested, meaning theres less going to waste. It comes with a 10-year warranty on parts and the motor, so you can crank it up every day without worry about wear and tear.

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Eric Peterson has dedicated 20 years of his life to the video game industry, handling development and production in startups and large studios alike. He has a passion for space games, and in April 2012, he helped found Cloud Imperium Games, the studio building Chris Roberts' massive interstellar simulator Star Citizen. Cloud Imperium has since raised $78.6 million from nearly 900,000 dedicated fans, with more adding to the pot every day; it's the largest and most ridiculous crowdfunding campaign in gaming history. Late last year, Peterson walked away from Cloud Imperium, Star Citizen and that pile of cash. Not because he wasn't into the game anymore; he just didn't want to leave his home in Austin, Texas.

"I loved working on the project; I just didn't want to move to Los Angeles," Peterson says. "They're my friends. Look, I built that company with them. ... It's just that, I've made sacrifices before in this industry for games that almost cost me personally with my family. So I'm just not willing to do that anymore. The priorities for me are family first."

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JINS is a glasses maker on a mission: to make glasses worth talking about again. That usually entails a dash of technology thrown in; a few years ago, for instance, the company dotted spectacle-selling vending machines across Tokyo. Yes, it's a Japanese company. Yes, they're also dabbling in smartglasses. But I'm not talking about any of that this time. No, I took a whole 10 minutes designing my own pair of glasses on the company's "Paint" app, and then a week later, I was wearing them. It's not nearly as elaborate as, say, 3D printing, but it does offer a relatively cheap way of making yourself a one-of-a-kind pair of glasses. And mine probably would have looked better, if I had even a single creative bone in my body.

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Are self-driving cars the future? They very well could be. Still, you shouldn't expect to see Mercedes' F 015 and other similar prototypes on public roads anytime soon. To learn more about this and the future of the car industry, we took to the New York Auto Show to speak to representatives of some of the largest manufacturers in the world -- Ford, Nissan, Honda, Jaguar and Chevrolet. While most of these companies already have autonomous projects in the works, they all agree that vehicles won't look terribly different over the next five to 10 years. In the near-term future, the focus is to keep drivers safe and make it easier for them to stay connected to the outside world. The plan is to bring more digital safety features to cars, and for smartphones to work better with infotainment systems. Simply put, it's all about efficiency -- for now, anyway.

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A group of five impeccably dressed high school girls are almost murdered dozens of times by the same, mysterious stalker and the police in their idyllic small town are either corrupt or too incompetent to care. How do the girls fight back? Hacking, of course. At least, that's one way they do it on Pretty Little Liars. "Hacking" is the deus ex machina in plenty of scenarios on Pretty Little Liars and other mainstream programs, allowing people to easily track, harass, defend and stalk each other 30 to 60 minutes at a time.

But how real is it? To determine the feasibility of the hacks presented on shows like Pretty Little Liars, Sherlock, Scandal, Arrow, CSI: Cyber and Agents of SHIELD, I spoke to Patrick Nielsen, senior security researcher at Kaspersky Lab.

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There are a lot of vehicles at the New York International Auto Show, naturally. This year, though, the prominent theme for carmakers, both from the US and abroad, seemed to be bright colors and concept projects. And that is, after all, what auto shows are essentially about. From the new Honda Civic to the Audi A8-esque Lincoln Continental, there's no doubt that manufacturers aren't afraid to push the envelope and, in the case of the latter, even borrow some design elements from top-tier competitors. One thing is for sure, however: Many of the rides at the event don't need Xzibit to show up and make them stand out. So, with that in mind, here are some of the best and most impressive cars from the 2015 New York Auto Show.

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PlayStation Home, Sony's answer to the Second Life question no one asked, was never where the company's heart lived. Maybe its greasy, suppurating id lived in those gleaming neon halls, somewhere between the bowling alley full of dead-eyed polygon people and the virtual shopping mall. You know the PlayStation Home shopping mall I'm talking about. It's the one where you could spend very real money on an entirely fake golden statue of a robot lady with impossibly proportioned breasts.

After seven years, the majority of which were spent in beta testing, Sony closed Home's doors this week. The PlayStation heart is secure elsewhere, for sure, but the shuttering of Home does mark the conclusion of an experiment true to the PlayStation soul, as well as the end of the brand's darkest era.

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The lights turn on and environment controls go into full swing as you approach. With a simple remote, you're able to bend appliances to your will. It's the ideal Jetsonian smart home and it's no longer the future; you can have it today. By picking up some connected switches and bulbs, it's easy to get your old-fashioned digs into space-age shape. The cost of admission can be a little steep, though, once you factor in the requisite hub required to tie many of these pieces together. Plus, it's not always a one-touch setup. Nyrius Electronics wants to cut out the complexity and high cost from this equation with its series of intelligent Bluetooth-connected devices. The company already offers a colorful smart LED lightbulb and it's expanding the line to include a new Smart Outlet that's currently in the middle of a Kickstarter campaign. This app-controlled outlet fits into standard three-prong sockets, letting you manage the power of plugged-in items with your mobile device. With a price tag of $40 each, it could be a viable solution -- especially if you're on a budget. Keep in mind, though, there are some inherent limitations to this type of design.

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This post was done in partnership with The Wirecutter, a list of the best technology to buy. Read the full article below at TheWirecutter.com

Over the past three winters, we've tested more than 20 pairs of touchscreen gloves while moving half a ton of stumps, climbing on ice, and just walking and biking around town. For the third year running and despite some stiff competition, the Winter Style Touchscreen Gloves by Glider Gloves are the ones we recommend for most people, offering up the best combination of warmth, dexterity, and grip for about $30 (also available direct). They're not the absolute warmest gloves you can buy, but they're warmer than anything that's better at handling touchscreens and better at handling touchscreens than anything that's warmer.

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The sound of gunfire echoes across the room, followed by an approving roar from the crowd. A five-man team called "Ninjas in Pyjamas" has taken the lead and fans can hardly contain their excitement. Another counter-terrorist suddenly drops to the floor and the noise from the crowd rises again, as two suit-clad presenters babble feverishly into headsets about the tactics at play. There's no time for celebration though. The players remain fixated on their PC monitors, fingers dancing across keyboards and mice as they guide their virtual characters around an abandoned warehouse complex.

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