Indie puzzler 'Fez' resurfaces with a $100 special edition

We aren't getting a sequel to the adorable retro indie puzzler Fez well... ever. But that doesn't mean developer Polytron is out of things to sell fans. The Canadian company hopes the wound it opened by canceling the sequel won't deter you from dropping $100 on a special edition of the game that features a rather handsome hardcover notebook, "bound in red canvas with debossed gold foil inlay presented in a matching slipcase," download codes for PC and OSX versions of the game and a copy of its killer soundtrack from composer Disasterpeace.

Lara Croft's awesome mobile adventure adds a free tomb to raid

Lara Croft has a pretty big adventure on Xbox One this fall with Rise of the Tomb Raider, but her grand mobile mission is about grow too. Developer Square Enix Montreal announced it's dropping "The Shard of Life" expansion for Lara Croft GO tomorrow for free on Android and iOS (sorry, Windows Phone folks) with some 26 fresh puzzles to tackle while you're waiting in line at the grocery store. More than that, the publisher is knocking 40 percent off the game's price -- it'll run you $2.99 for a limited time. Oh and its hosting a Twitch event tasking the game's community to solve the new puzzles.

By default, the haptic touchpads that define Valve's Steam Controller are just thumb-friendly fill-ins for a proper mouse -- but that's not all they can do. Thanks to a new Steam client beta update, the Steam Controller's signature touchapds can now do something now standard PC mouse can: instantly warp your cursor anywhere on the screen at the touch of a thumb.

'Dragons Lair' movie project leaves Kickstarter, heads to Indiegogo

Don't worry, Dragon's Lair fans, the proposed feature-length project is still happening -- but it won't be raising money on Kickstarter. Creators Don Bluth and Gary Goldman have cancelled their original crowdfunding campaign and will be relaunching it on Indiegogo on December 1. They promise it'll be "a stronger, more valiant campaign" that takes into account suggestions from fans. Bluth and Goldman didn't say specifically why they were shifting the campaign, but we've reached out for comment. One big advantage Indiegogo has over Kickstarter is "Flexible Funding," which lets crowdfunding organizers keep the money they raise, even if they don't reach their goal. The pair aimed to raise $550,000 to produce a short to court investors and studios, who would hopefully back a feature-length Dragon's Lair film (which ultimately could cost upwards of $100 million). They ended up raising over $241,000 in one month before nixing the Kickstarter campaign. I can't blame them for aiming high, but honestly I'd settle for a lower-budget film backed by the likes of Netflix or Amazon.

When Samsung and Oculus debuted their Gear VR headset almost a year ago, the companies made it clear the device wasn't yet ready for the masses. Billed as "Innovator Edition" models, the original Gear VRs were intended mainly for early adopters. They only fitted a limited number of phones -- the original was designed just for the Note 4; the second for the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge -- and were also quite pricey at $200 per headset. Just last week, however, the two companies released the first-ever consumer-ready version of the Gear VR. It's smaller, lighter, cheaper (only $99) and is compatible with more phones (the Note 5, S6, S6 Edge and S6 Edge+). But, more importantly, its content library has exploded, with more VR apps and games than ever before. Virtual reality has finally gone mainstream, and there's no better way to get started than with the new Gear VR.

'Retro City Rampage' is getting a '16-bit' sequel

Retro City Rampage is getting a sequel named Shakedown Hawaii. Like RCR, Shakedown is a top-down action game in the same vein as the original Grand Theft Auto. The new game is set 30 years after RCR and promises a large open world to explore. It also swaps in "16-bit" graphics in place of the original's "8-bit" look, and adds destructible environments to the mix. It's been confirmed for launch on PC, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita. Developer Vblank says this isn't a Sony console exclusive per se, but it's not going for an Xbox One launch as RCR hasn't been ported to Microsoft's machine, making development more complex. It'll also come to "at least one Nintendo platform" at some point. Vblank tells Polygon that a 3DS release is being targeted, and it's waiting to hear more about Nintendo's next-gen "NX" console before it makes a decision on a port.

Sony PlayStation 4 sales speed past 30 million

In just over two years Sony's sold over 30 million PlayStation 4s. That tally was 20.2 million in March, and now ahead of the busy holiday shopping season we have word from the Japanese tech giant that it's sold through more than 30.2 million consoles to some 124 countries and regions globally. That's roughly 1.25 million consoles per month since then, as of November 22nd. Impressive! Of course, Microsoft announced that the Xbox One was the number one-selling console for October, and that Halo 5 was the best selling game last month, but as per usual didn't give out any hard numbers.

Ah, Thanksgiving -- the perfect time to relax with your family and play something slow, wholesome and casual. Nintendo, it's your time to shine: join us as we check out Animal Crossing Amiibo Festival and Mario Tennis Ultra Smash on Wii U to see which game better compliments a gluttonous holiday meal. We'll be streaming at 6PM Eastern / 3PM Pacific right here in this post, on the Engadget Gaming homepage and, if you want to join us in chat, at And yes, it's okay to vent your Amiibo shopping frustrations here. This is a safe space, friends. We understand.

Sony's had its Remote Play tech in one form or another since the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable, but it didn't truly take off until its implementation on PlayStation 4 and the PS Vita handheld. But that's kind of wasted when nobody is buying the Vita and it's getting zero love from its parent company. Remote Play PC is exactly what its name implies: an application that tricks the PS4 into thinking a PC is a Remote Play device. Microsoft changed the game (sorry) with the ability for the Xbox One to stream its games to Windows 10-based hardware and until Sony catches up we're just going to have to settle for an unofficial app that costs money to perform the task.

Crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter don't deal in investments: Backers pledge money to a project and that's generally where their involvement ends. No purchasing shares, no percentage of final sales. Video game-funding platform Fig, however, combines this traditional form of crowdfunding with actual investment -- and it will allow unaccredited people to invest in its next campaign. This move opens up investment to people who aren't SEC-accredited, meaning they don't make at least $200,000 a year (or have a minimum net worth of $1 million). "We believe that fans, in addition to having the opportunity to participate in the rewards-only tiers, should also have the opportunity to buy shares and participate in the financial success of a title," Fig CEO Justin Bailey says in a press release.

Sorry we haven't updated the buyers's guide in a couple months -- we've been too busy pumping out reviews of all the new devices. Now that things have finally started to slow down (fingers crossed), let's take a step back and look at all the awesome stuff we've had a chance to test this fall. For starters, there's a bunch of excellent smartphones that we absolutely need to add to our guide. Namely: the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, the Nexus 6P and 5X, and the Moto X Pure. On the tablet side, we're inducting both the iPad mini 4 and the Surface Pro 4. Microsoft makes another appearance in the laptop section, where we've added the Surface Book, along with Dell's Chromebook 13. Rounding out the list, we threw in a few miscellaneous items, including the new Xbox One Elite Wireless controller, the redesigned Sonos Play:5 wireless speaker and Google's $35 Chromecast Audio.

Games E3 Microsoft

Halo 5's campaign is hot garbage if you're playing through it solo, but the multiplayer suite is pretty much the opposite if you're into competitive shooters. It's a likely reason why Microsoft is shifting its latest ad and PR focus around the mode -- pre-release hype centered on the game's flaccid story. The latest step in that? Bringing your customized Spartan soldier into the real world via 3D printing. Redmond has aligned with custom 3D printing house Sandboxr and printer manufacturer 3D Systems to put your unique Slayer combatant (sorry, Kerry King) in the palm of your hand. Using the web interface, Xbox Wire says you can choose from 175 armor and helmet options, over 30 color variants and five different poses with a quintet of weapons. The classic "teabag" pose isn't one of the available selections, however, but you can make an 18-character moniker for the statue.