Thanks a lot, Bethesda. After the outfit's first E3 media briefing, I pre-ordered the Pip-Boy Edition of Fallout 4 because of course I want to put a real-life version of the game's stat-tracker and menu system on my forearm. All good, right? Well, I'm also in the market for a new phone and was eyeing an iPhone 6 Plus because it has a better camera and battery life compared to its smaller sibling, the iPhone 6. That's where the problems arise: Bethesda recently announced that the real-world Pip-Boy comes with foam inserts that fit the iPhone 4 and 4s, 5 and 5s and the 6 in addition to the Samsung Galaxy S4 and S5. The company also promises a customizable foam insert that'll accommodate "most other popular" handsets.

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Professional gaming is a hot item in the investment world right now and even the largest eSports organizations are getting in on the action. On Wednesday, international entertainment company MTG purchased ESL, the largest eSports organization in the world. MTG spent 78 million euros ($86.4 million) for a majority stake -- 74 percent -- in ESL's holding company, Turtle Entertainment GmbH. This deal marks the first acquisition of an eSports company by a traditional media organization.

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It's only natural for an entertainment corporation as massive as The Walt Disney Company, with IP holdings that span the likes of Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm, to be exploring the potential of virtual reality. It's something John Vignocchi, VP of production at Disney Interactive, the division behind toys-to-life platform Disney Infinity, confirmed when we chatted a few weeks back. But when it comes to Infinity, the future focus seems to be weighted more toward augmented reality. "We've had multiple meetings and discussions with Oculus, multiple meetings and discussions with Sony about Morpheus, multiple meetings and discussions with Microsoft about HoloLens. We're very interested in that space," Vignocchi said. "There's the socialization problem right now with VR, but augmented reality is very exciting."

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Title:  Scientist Looking Through a MicroscopeCreative image #:  ST001549License type:  Royalty-freePhotographer:  Hisham I

In the same way that people write words onto grains of rice, one programmer has managed to build a game with code that can fit into a single tweet. The 140-character opus is called Tiny Twitch and was created by Alex Yoder after responding to an open challenge by developer Ben Porter. Unsurprisingly, the game's not going to rival the blockbuster hits of this world, since you're simply asked to click an X as it bounces around your browser as many times as you can. If you're interested in giving this a go, it's available to play right now and let us know if you can get higher score than 17 before time runs out.

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Acer's XR341CK curved display

You can get desktop PC displays that are curved, super-wide and gaming-friendly, but all three at once? That's tricky. Thankfully, Acer thinks it has an answer. The company has just launched the 34-inch XR341CK in the US, giving you a curvy, 21:9 aspect ratio LCD with AMD's anti-tearing FreeSync tech built-in. So long as you have a fast-enough gaming rig (including newer AMD graphics, if you want FreeSync), you'll get an extra-immersive canvas for your first-person shooters and racing sims.

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Indie games don't sell as many copies as big-budget titles, although not necessarily because they're lower-quality. In general, indie game development starts with a handicap: a limited market. They are, mostly, experiences made for niche audiences. AAA games -- think Call of Duty, Halo, Battlefield, Destiny -- are made for everyone, an audience that's been intensely researched over decades of action-movie box-office sales and Black Friday marketing campaigns. AAA consultants know exactly which games sell the best, where they sell the most, how much the mainstream audience wants to think and what their boundaries are. This approach to creation contributes to the flood of sequels and first-person shooters in our game libraries, now and into the foreseeable future. Sony's and Microsoft's showcases at E3 2015 were soaked in sequels and remakes, leading some fans to question the creative status of the industry as a whole. But, the AAA industry does innovate -- in its own, small way.

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Most people haven't hosted a party for 10,000 guests (the bathroom situation alone is daunting), but thanks to the internet and Jackbox Games, that's now a super-easy, low-mess situation. Quiplash is the newest game from Jackbox -- makers of You Don't Know Jack and Fibbage -- and it boasts a pretty cool feature: Just one person needs to own the game for up to 10,000 people to play in a single round. This is a game built for streaming.

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Minecraft has proven to be an invaluable tool for educators and students. Not only is the game popular with children and adults, but its open, customisable nature means it can be used for all sorts of different purposes. Like learning to code, understanding Britain's geography and reimagining modern art. Microsoft clearly knows this, so it's launching a new portal where teachers can discuss the game and share classroom resources. The full site isn't live just yet, but the trailer below gives you an idea of what Microsoft and Mojang are aiming for. After this and its Hololens demonstration, it's clear the company sees its $2.5 billion acquisition as more than just a game with a guaranteed smash-hit sequel.

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Mojang means Minecraft. But that's not the only thing the Microsoft-owned developer tinkers away at. Scrolls was another project: an online card-based battle game that's available across PC, Mac and tablets. Unfortunately, the title has reached the end of its life, with the developer announcing that it will discontinue work on the game. It doesn't offer up a particular reason for the quiet ending, but we've reached out to see if there was any particular reason -- the developer claimed a legal victory against Bethesda in being able to name the game "Scrolls" in the first place, but was bound from naming any sequels similarly. Mojang promises that it'll keep the servers running for another year, so that's twelve more months to tackle the latest update and levels, which were released only last month.

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'Battlezone' circa 1998

The trends of remaking and remastering classic games just kicked into overdrive. Rebellion (best known for its Sniper Elite games) has revealed that it's developing not just a virtual reality version of the original Battlezone, but a refresh of the 1998 Battlezone title for PCs -- yes, it's a remake getting a remaster. It's too soon to know what this new version will entail, although it'll probably be fun if it maintains the 'original' mix of tank-based action, real-time strategy and an alternate-history space race. Let's just hope that someone doesn't try to re-do the remaster a decade from now... that would be a bit much.

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Couple playing videogames

We know that Pavlovian conditioning can make you do all sorts of crazy things, so could it be used to make us all a bit healthier? Psychologists from the universities of Exeter and Cardiff believe that it's possible after building a "computer game" that, essentially, trains you to steer clear of bad food. Unfortunately, the game itself is just a flashcard routine where players are asked to push a button when they're shown salad and hold off when they see cookies. If we're honest, the bad guys in the food and drink industry still have the upper hand, just look at Cool Spot, the 1993 platformer that was a giant ad for 7 Up.

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