Pebble's iPhone app with iOS 7 notification support is available for download now

Talk about Kickstarter and, inevitably, Pebble will come up. The smartwatch received over $10 million in funding, and was one of the biggest success stories to come from the site. What's interesting, however, is that the minimalist aesthetic carries over into the feature set -- offering nothing more than the odd notification and music control, and yet nailing it totally. The aim of this discussion, however, is to ask what you think and feel about the unit now that it's been strapped to your wrist for the better part of a year? So why not head over to the forum and share your experiences.

0 Comments

NASA G2 flywheel energy storage

NASA knows that conventional battery power won't cut it at a certain point, especially when the agency's vehicles travel into deep space. To that end, it's asking both public institutions and companies to submit proposals for battery alternatives. The initiative will tackle both low-level energy cell design, such as chemistry and packaging, as well as advanced devices that could outperform existing lithium cells. Ideally, NASA will get energy storage that provides more power without taking a hit to either longevity or safety.

[Image credit: NASA]

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Welcome to the first edition of the Joystiq Weekly Wrap-up, where we present some of the best stories and biggest news from our beloved sister-publication. After the break you'll find, among other things, Pokémon, the Big Bad Wolf and the final word on Titanfall's ongoing multiplayer examination. Our brothers and sisters in arms are on the ground in Boston this weekend for PAX East too, and you can find all of that coverage right here. Pour a frosty beverage and join us for the week's gaming news, won't you?

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Turkish prime minister Erdogan's election campaign banner

Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan isn't happy that free speech rights thwarted his desires to block Twitter and silence corruption allegations, so he's switching to plan B: accuse Twitter of shady dealings. He's now promising to "go after" the social network for tax evasion, and has implied that other internet-based peers like Facebook and YouTube might be breaking local laws. We've reached out to Twitter for its response, but we wouldn't expect the company to take Erdogan's charge lightly.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Welcome to IRL, an ongoing feature where we talk about the gadgets, apps and toys we're using in real life and take a second look at products that already got the formal review treatment.

IRL: A rant about Nintendo's Virtual Console service

Before you send in your angry emails, comments and tweets that decry me as a hatchet-wielding antichrist, let's begin by saying that I'm not a gamer. I do play games, but I have no specific allegiance to a console or manufacturer -- I simply go where the fun is. My console history, for editorial balance, includes the VIC 20, Commodore 64, NES, Mega Drive (Genesis), PlayStation, PlayStation 2, Xbox 360 and the Wii. That means that I'm about as much of a dilettante as you can be, and there's no bias or malice in the following. Just disappointment.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

When news of the Heartbleed internet security bug broke last week, Bloomberg reported that the NSA may have known about the OpenSSL flaw for years, using it to gain info instead of warning the public. The government agency was quick to deny that story, saying that it found when the rest of us did. But as it turns out, if they had kept the discovery secret in the interest of a national security threat, that would've been okay thanks to a January decision by President Obama. The New York Times reports that although details were never publicly reported by the White House, info about the choice began to surface after Friday's advance knowledge of the Heartbleed situation. The President determined that unless there's "a clear national security or law enforcement need," it's better for the government to publicly disclose those internet flaws that it uncovers -- in the interest of getting them fixed. Of course, this wording is quite vague, leaving quite a bit of room for interpretation.

[Photo credit: Larry Downing/AFP/Getty Images]

0 Comments

Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green.

Airplanes are major CO2 emitters, but it doesn't need to be that way. For the past several years, two Swiss innovators, André Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard, have been flying around the world in a sun-powered plane, spreading the word about solar power. Last week, the duo announced the debut of the new and improved Solar Impulse 2 aircraft, which they'll use to attempt a flight around the globe. While the Solar Impulse is charting new territory in the skies, Tesla is changing the game on the roads. Last month Tesla sold 1,493 Model S sedans in Norway, breaking a 28-year-old monthly sales record and outselling every other vehicle in the country. Thanks in part to Tesla's success, electric cars are selling at a furious pace: A recent report shows that EV sales are currently growing by more than 100 percent per year. Smaller is better when it comes to urban cars -- especially for parking -- but there are drawbacks to owning a pint-size car. In San Francisco, vandals recently went on a Smart Car-tipping spree, flipping the tiny cars upside down in the middle of the night. A bicycle is still best way to get around the city, both for your health and the health of the planet. In Boston, doctors are now prescribing bike share memberships to obese patients, encouraging exercise instead of medication.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

General Imagery Of Cherry Blossom In Bloom

In 2008 Japanese scientists decided to take a handful of cherry tree seeds (and by "handful" we mean over 250) to space. The embryonic plants spent eight months aboard the International Space Station as part of an educational project aimed at children. When the stones returned, 14 of them were selected and planted around Japan. The saplings were expected to bloom after 10 years of maturation. Instead, four of them sprouted flowers this year -- a full six years ahead of schedule. The sudden and extremely early blossoming of the trees has scientists quite confused and desperately seeking answers. Kaori Tomita-Yokotani, from the University of Tsukuba, told AFP she was stumped. "There is the possibility that exposure to stronger cosmic rays accelerated the process of sprouting and overall growth," she said, but also suggested that cross pollination could be the culprit. Since the project involving the seeds was not a true experiment, and more a stunt to pique the interest of children, there is no control group to compare against. In fact, there's very little data at all for the scientists to work with. We're betting on the cosmic rays, though. We all know what happens when humans are bombarded by them.

0 Comments

Usually, the Internal Revenue Service is the one getting paid this time of year, but Uncle Sam will be lining someone else's pockets this tax season because of its attachment to Windows XP. In case you hadn't heard, support for XP officially stopped on April 8th, meaning that Microsoft will no longer provide support or security updates for the venerable OS. However, governmental computers can't be left vulnerable, so the IRS will be paying Microsoft millions of dollars for custom support to keep their machines secure and functional. Right now, over half the agency's PCs still run XP, despite Microsoft telling the whole world that it would stop support for the OS in 2014 six years ago. The plan is to have all IRS machines running Windows 7 by the end of the year -- at which point the clock starts ticking on the transition to Windows 8. No rush, though, Microsoft has pledged to support Windows 7 through 2020. Let the governmental procrastination begin!

[Image Credit: Alamy]

0 Comments