Turkey has joined the ranks of Iran, Egypt and others who have blocked access to Twitter at one point or another. Now, anyone in Turkey who tries to go to the website is redirected to a statement from the country's telecommunications regulator instead. A Turkish journalist told The Daily Dot that the outage started just after Thursday midnight and gradually spread out, depending on users' internet providers. It looks like the government didn't block the microblogging site's SMS service, though, because Twitter's Policy account just reminded Avea and Vodafone users that they can text START to 2444, while Turkcell subscribers can text START to 2555. But, why was Twitter banned in Turkey in the first place? Well, that's because some users posted voice recordings and documents, which allegedly reveal corruption within the Turkish prime minister's inner circle -- and that sure didn't sit well with Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

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In a bit of news that's familiar to anyone who ever put on an old jacket and found $20 in the pocket, embattled Bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox has made a fortuitous discovery. The company announced (PDF) in Japan that it found 200,000 Bitcoin (worth nearly $116 million at the moment) in a wallet from 2011 that it no longer used. That's less than a quarter of the 850,000 Bitcoins CEO Mark Karpeles reported were missing, but at the moment, at least it's something. According to its statement, the coins were moved to online wallets on the 7th, and then to offline wallets on the 14th and 15th. The mystery of what happened to Mt. Gox's funds is still far from solved, but between this news and reports of updated balances for account holders, it seems possible that there's something to be recovered from the shuttered exchange. Next up, removing all of the cushions from the sofa and pulling it away from the wall.

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Medium for iPhone

We can't say we know all that many people who routinely digest articles posted through Medium's social publishing platform. However, the readership is bound to go up now that the service has released an iPhone app. The mobile client is more of a story curation tool than anything else. It automatically fetches stories from both your Twitter friends and any collections you follow, optimizing the reading interface beyond what you'd normally get in your web browser. You won't want to plan on writing any diatribes, though, since the iOS app has no editing tools -- you'll have to retreat to a PC when inspiration strikes. If you don't mind that limitation, Medium's client is ready and waiting in the App Store.

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Sprint isn't content to keep writing its financial statements in red ink. To that end, the company is shuttering 150 service and repair centers, 55 of its lowest performing retail stores and laying off some 330 repair techs. A handful of call centers have been closed, too. While these might seem troubling, the outfit's Mark Bonavia tells CNET that the pre-planned cuts were made with the idea of "minimal disturbance" to the customer in mind. What does that even mean? Well, if a local store can't service your phone, you'll be referred to a sister location that's within a 45-minute drive. This likely isn't a perfect situation for everyone, but hey, Softbank needs to free up money for that T-Mobile acquisition somehow.

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An ex-Microsoft employee was recently arrested for allegedly leaking company secrets, all because Redmond found evidence against him in his contact's Hotmail account. Hold on, is it even legal for the company to go through someone's account without permission? Well, according to Microsoft, it sure is -- in fact, Hotmail's Terms of Service apparently states that the company can "access or disclose information about you" for a number of reasons. Since Microsoft's actions are quite dubious, it was forced to defend itself (read the full statement after the break) when news of the arrest broke. The company says that while its ToS (which people don't usually read) clearly states that it has the right to look through a user's account, it does so "only in the most exceptional circumstances."

[Image credit: Victor/Flickr]

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As meaningful as GarageBand's mobile life is to Apple, the tune-making app is still considered a valuable piece of real estate on the desktop. However, last year GarageBand for Mac lost MP3 exporting as a feature, something which unsettled some of its users. The good news: today's release brings that back, once again allowing you to export those music creations as MP3 files. Additionally, Apple's thrown in a few Drummers and drum packs from various genres, including songwriter, rock and R&B. Who knows, these kits might play a part in you becoming the next Pharrell. Maybe, just maybe.

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The Blink app for Windows Phone 8 is already pretty good, and it's about to get even better. Microsoft Research has released a new version of its photography application, complete with a fresh look and a swath of new features. Aside from letting you create GIFs, Blink now makes it easier for you to lock on your subject, take more stable shots and quickly get to gallery view, where you can see the stuff you've captured. You can also see images show up on your Start screen, thanks to added Live Tile support. Plus, there's a new tutorial mode -- perfect for those who have yet to take the app for a spin. Either way, the revamped Blink is available now from the Windows Phone Store.

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Comcast's first transparency report

Comcast must not want to feel left out as telcos begin publishing regular government data request statistics -- the cable giant has just posted its first transparency report. The document reveals that Comcast obeyed more than 25,000 government demands for info during 2013, including 24,698 criminal requests (such as warrants) and 961 emergency requests. There isn't as much detail for national security requests due to federal rules, but the report shows that Comcast isn't under quite as much scrutiny as its peers. The provider received less than 1,000 national security letters last year, while Verizon reported between 1,000 and 1,999; AT&T says it got between 2,000 and 2,999. The differences aren't surprising when Comcast has no cellular customers these days. However, those numbers are bound to grow if Comcast succeeds in buying Time Warner Cable.

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Twitter video previews in iOS

Checking out a linked video from within Twitter's official mobile apps is frequently a clumsy process, but it's about to get a lot smoother. The social network has started rolling out simple in-line video previews on both its Android and iOS apps. If you've received the upgrade, you'll see thumbnails of clips in your timeline; all you have to do is tap them to watch the footage from within the Twitter app. The move is no doubt meant to drive up views of promoted videos, but we won't mind if it helps us catch up on cat videos during our daily commutes.

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