Sweaters, jackets and long johns are all "wearables" that keep us warm, but they aren't all that smart -- if you walk into a room that's too hot or exercise too hard, you need to stop using them to cool down. It's an inconvenience we've grown used to, but we don't have to put up with it much longer: a pair of engineers are creating new self-heating shirt that automatically adjusts its temperature to meet your body's needs. Set your desired body temperature and it will heat up to help you reach it, then shut off to keep things from getting too hot. It's called the FuelWear Flame Base Layer, and it's already reached its original $20,000 goal on IndieGoGo.

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"The sharing economy" is a buzzword that's thrown around to talk about services like AirBnB and Lyft, and now it looks as if Toyota wants in on the trend. The automaker is putting 70 electric cars into commission in France, half of them being i-Road EVs, as spotted by Gizmodo. Instead of competing with the existing public transit system that's in place, however, Toyota says this will work alongside the city of Grenoble's infrastructure making the likes of one-way trips, among other things, easier. So long as there's a drop-off station near your destination, there's no need to worry about parking or a return trip, either, apparently. Reserving a ride can be handled with a smartphone app and rental fees start at €3 (about $4) -- cheaper than minimum fare on Uber. In the land of baguette and interested? Service starts in October.

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Beauty portrait, mouth

Reading lips is a skill usually reserved for fictional spies or the hearing impaired, but researchers have spent years trying to gift the talent to computers, too. A device capable of automated lip-reading would certainly be a game changer, raising questions of personal privacy while simultaneously creating new opportunities in the accessibility and security industries. Don't get too nervous (or excited) though -- Ahmad Hassanat, a researcher at Mu'Tah University in Jordan, says we have a long way to go before machine eyes can tell what we're saying.

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Apple made a pretty big deal about WiFi calling at its event this week, but if you preordered an iPhone 6 or 6 Plus running on AT&T today, you won't be able to use it right out of the box. That feature, according to LightReading, won't be available until next year. The carrier's Ralph de la Vega says the delay is because he wants to make sure that actually using the tech is a good experience for customers and doesn't result in annoyances like, say, dropped calls when switching from WiFi to mobile data. T-Mobile believes it's sidestepping that by giving every customer a router that prioritizes voice calls -- something that AT&T apparently doesn't need to do because it doesn't share the magenta network's coverage issues. De la Vega says he sees the tech not as a replacement for voice over LTE and 3G, but a complement. Shots fired?

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The vocabulary we use to describe music can be tough enough for a human to grok (really, what does it mean when a guitar riff is "crunchy"?) but a team of tinkerers from Birmingham City University aren't interested in helping people understand that language. Nope -- instead, they've cooked up a way to teach your computer what you mean when you throw around words like "bright" or "fuzzy" or, yes, "crunchy" with a program they call the SAFE Project.

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Google Chromebook Lending Library

If you brought a big, conventional laptop with you to college, you're probably regretting it right about now. It's not fun to lug a heavy machine and your textbooks around campus. You may have an easy way to try out something a little kinder to your back, though. Google has unveiled the Chromebook Lending Library, a demo program that lets students borrow a featherweight Chrome OS machine for a few days. So long as Google is on the school grounds, the system is yours; you can take notes in class or just catch up on Netflix in your dorm room. The Library arrives at both Syracuse at Walnut Park and Texas State University next week, and it'll swing by other institutions in the weeks ahead. The big catch? You can't actually buy a Chromebook from the Library if you're enamored with the experience -- you'll likely have to venture into town to pick one up.

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Need to hear more from Tim Cook after this week's new iPhone and Watch event? Charlie Rose will air a two-part interview with the Apple CEO tonight and Monday, and excerpts posted to YouTube point to a few popular topics about the company. Cook discusses his company's purchase of Beats by pointing out the brand Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre were able to build, and their recognition of the human element in putting together playlists. In another clip, he continues the longstanding tradition of pointing out how ancient and backwards the TV experience still is, and that Apple is interested in it (we'll reference our advice from 2012 on how to handle these rumors) -- without revealing anything about plans to actually enter the market or adjust the approach of its Apple TV box. You can view the clips embedded after the break, and the first part of the interview tonight (likely at 11PM) on your local PBS affiliate.

Update: The full episode is embedded after the break via Hulu Plus, and pt. 2 will air Monday night, again probably at 11PM on your local PBS affiliate. In part two Tim Cook will talk a bit about privacy and the NSA, there's also a clip of that below.

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What if you didn't have worry about people seeing that picture or video you post after 24 hours? That's just what Tiiny, the latest effort from Digg co-founder Kevin Rose, offers: disappearing thumbnail-sized images and vids in a constantly refreshing grid. Snapshots and footage from your pals appear there and they can't be resized to judge fine details. In theory, this means that you'll be a lot more forthcoming about your activities since there's a lack of permanence and reduced pressure to add the proper filters. So, in addition to the ephemeral nature that the likes of Snapchat and others offer, there's the compact stature, too. There's also a Popular page, so you can see what's getting the most love across all Tiiny users. If you're looking to give it a shot, the iOS app is available now.

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All Access public playlists ain't nothin' to mess with

You may remember that Google Play Music All Access on Android briefly got public playlist searching back in August, only to lose the option a short while later. Well, it's back -- and this time, it appears to be here to stay. Much like Spotify, the update Play Music app now lets you find others' carefully curated mixes and stream them on the spot. If you need a ready-made party playlist or just want to find out what your friends are listening to, you only have to visit the playlists section and start typing. The feature may take a while to hit your phone, but Android Police has a download if you can't wait to check out others' tastes in tunes.

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