Qualcomm Snapdragon

Qualcomm is sitting pretty right now. Its Snapdragon processors and cellular chips are present in most of the big-name mobile devices you can use today, whether it's the Nexus 6 or the iPhone. However, the company isn't content to stop there -- it just confirmed plans to launch its own line of server processors. CEO Steve Mollenkopf isn't offering many details just yet, but it won't surprise you to hear that these heavy duty CPUs would be ARM-based like their mobile counterparts. There's no timing yet, either, although the exec adds that his firm is already "engaged with customers."

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Most camera manufacturers will milk a popular model dry, but not Sony! Just a year after releasing the first full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Alpha 7 and Alpha 7R, Sony has revealed their successor: the Alpha 7 II. Launched in Japan only, for now, the new model is Sony's first with 5-axis in-body stabilization for still photos and video, which helps reduce camera shake regardless of the lens used. Even with lenses that have no stabilization at all, the sensor itself is shifted in the pitch, roll, yaw, X and Y axis to counteract camera movement.

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Well, that didn't take long: Earlier this week, the internet caught wind of a few less-than-legitimate sellers listing PlayStation 4s on Amazon at ridiculously low prices -- we're talking $90 or less for a $400 item -- and took advantage of Walmart's new price-matching policy. Now the retail giant has adjusted said policy regarding such. The company says it'll only honor pricing from 30 "major" online retailers including Amazon, Best Buy, Cabela's and Kohl's from here on out. Marketplace vendors, third-party sellers (one of the ways this ordeal started), etailers requiring a membership and auction sites including eBay aren't eligible under the new revision. A Walmart spokesperson tells Wall Street Journal that it was a significant enough amount to change the policy "quickly," but, wouldn't say exactly how much the alleged fraud cost the company.

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It looks like soon enough we'll be seeing Street View pictures and those spiffy Photo Spheres making their way from Google Maps and onto our favorite websites. How's that, pray tell? An update to Mountain View's Maps Embed API (targeted at web developers) is setting those images free, naturally. The search giant says that this previously was an omission from the last API release, and that it was spotted by a Developers blog reader. Google also says there won't be any usage restrictions on the embeds either, so hopefully we'll get more 360 degree panoramas in various places sooner rather than later. If and when the average Joe will get this access, however, remains to be seen.

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When Parrot told us a few months ago that its Bebop Drone would arrive "later this year," we couldn't have imagined it would be this late in 2014. Regardless, chances are this won't stop UAV aficionados from shelling out cash for Parrort's new super lightweight, VR-friendly drone when it hits shelves next month starting at $500. To give you a refresher, the Bebop features a 14-megapixel, 1080p camera with a fisheye lens capable of capturing a 180-degree view, 8GB of onboard flash storage and a featherweight frame that, according to Parrot, is quite robust and safe. What's more, with the $900 SkyController edition, the Bebop Drone's range can be extended to 2 kilometers and also be paired with virtual reality headsets, such as the Oculus Rift -- which, among other things, lets you control camera angles from afar. Both models will be available at Apple and Best Buy stores in December.

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TS Eliot's 'Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock'

Trying to rate the world's literary giants is tricky at best. Do you go by the number of books sold? The long-term cultural impact? If you're Dartmouth College researcher Allen Riddell, you make computers decide. As part of an effort to determine which books would be most valuable in the public domain, Riddell has developed an author ranking algorithm that determines the most important authors who died in a given year. The system ranks writers based on the age, length and popularity of their Wikipedia articles, along with the number of titles they have in the public domain. If an author gets a lot of attention but doesn't have many freely available works, that person climbs the charts and is more likely to have titles published on free literature sites like Project Gutenberg.

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US Crew Chief sergeant Monique Thevenet

If a team of researchers from MIT and Texas A&M University have their way, wounded soldiers will have soon have a better chance of survival. The project is a biodegradable gelatin that once injected, helps with blood coagulation, cutting down on blood loss internally. In some trials, the hydrogel decreased the time it took for the blood to clot by 77 percent after it maneuvered into position. The medical solution is still in the testing phase, but once its perfected, researchers hope to see soldiers add preloaded syringes packed with the material to their gear arsenals.

[Image credit: Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images]

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Uber Shows Taxis Never Same As Smartphones Roil U.S. Industry

Uber's PR nightmare of a week is getting even worse, as Senator Al Franken has joined those questioning the service about its ethics and commitment to user privacy. In a letter (PDF), Franken laid out ten specific questions for CEO Travis Kalanick to answer by December 15th, aimed at nailing down things like who has access to the controversial "God View" tool, and what (if any) disciplinary steps the company took as a result of executive Emil Michael's comments about a plan to dig up dirt on journalists critical of Uber. Michael's comments, originally reported by Buzzfeed and reportedly aimed at PandoDaily's Sarah Lacy, started a round of critique of the company's culture that doesn't look like it will end anytime soon. While we wait for this to shake out, PandoDaily cites several examples (two articles and a series of tweets by Ashton Kutcher) of what it's seeing as a smear campaign against the media by Uber and its backers. Oh, for the old days when car-sharing services and their riders only had to worry about regulators, robberies and hammer attacks.

[Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images]

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The GoPro Hero4 Black can shoot 4K at 30 fps. So why, then, does James Trew prefer the cheaper and less-equipped Hero4 Silver? Two words: the touchscreen. That's not all we have on deck, though -- read on for the rest of our news highlights from the last 24 hours, including YouTube's latest licensing battle, the Meizu MX4 Pro and Motorola's smart key fob.

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The

Online criminals aren't just trying to extract ransoms from unsuspecting individuals; they're targeting whole cities, too. Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan has revealed that hackers tried to hold a city database hostage in April, demanding 2,000 Bitcoins (currently worth about $803,500) before they handed it back. Thankfully, the emphasis is on "tried." As Duggan explains, Detroit wasn't even using that database any more -- it simply ignored the ransom request.

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