Dual-analog controls are pretty standard these days -- two analog sticks on either end of a control pad designed to fall directly under the user's thumbs. Hori's new 3DS slide pad accessory throws this notion out the window: it installs a second control pad on the same side as the handhelds primary input, putting the slider directly behind the console's L button. The accessory is built specifically to accommodate Monster Hunter diehards, but it's not as odd as it sounds: Japanese gamers have made a habit of modifying Nintendo's analog accessory into obtuse and unexpected configurations. Hori's layout is designed to allow players to move their character and manipulate the camera with just one hand, freeing up their right thumb for attacks and in-game actions. The accessory (available in both 3DS and 3DS XL variants) is available in Japan only, for now, to the tune of 2,980 yen.

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North American International Auto Show Held In Detroit

In order to boost output of the Model S and to prepare for production of the Model X SUV, Tesla has paused work at its only plant for two weeks. Bloomberg reports that $100 million in upgrades are on tap for the factory that will allow both vehicles to be constructed on the same assembly line. The changes will also increase production of the Model S sedan by 25 percent. As you may recall, the company's electric SUV has been delayed more than once, so by now there's a few folks anticipating the expected 2015 arrival.

[Photo credit: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images]

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It's official: Facebook now actually owns Oculus VR, the company behind virtual reality goggles Oculus Rift. Though the $2 billion acquisition was announced way back in March, these kinds of negotiations typically take months to resolve thanks to various regulations. Now they have. Facebook and Oculus released a joint statement today that simply states: "We're looking forward to an exciting future together, building the next computing platform and reimagining the way people communicate." As for just why the deal took place, Palmer Luckey, Oculus' founder, has said that the plan is to "promote the long-term adoption of virtual reality, not short-term financial returns" and that the partnership would become the "clear and obvious path to delivering virtual reality to everyone."

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It looks like that (pending 2 years for existing customers) price hike hasn't greatly affected Netflix's popularity, as it announced today that it has 50 million customers altogether. About 36 million of them are in the US, and Netflix specified that's about to launch in more European countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France, Belgium and Luxembourg) in September. Its profit also more than doubled this quarter, up to $71 million from about $30 million in the same period last year. The only real change mentioned for customers is that it's about to start distributing in-store gift cards this fall, so you can give the gift of Netflix or join without having to pay online with a credit card. The company's focus of course is how it's building up a library of exclusive content, and it says Orange is the New Black quickly became the most watched series in every Netflix territory when season two launched. Upcoming shows include Sense8 from the Wachowskis and the Daredevil series it's making with Marvel, and it's cast a number of big names for those shows already like Vincent D'Onofrio, Naveen Andrews and Rosario Dawson -- now that Netflix scored 31 Emmy nominations this year they clearly have a tough act to follow. The company's earnings chat will start in a few minutes, check after the break to watch it live and see a few more notes about its current status.

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The New Yorker Cover Illustration Of Obama And Wife Provokes Controversy

Let's face it: We miss out on a ton of great content due to paywalls. After a recent redesign to improve reading via its website across a range of devices, The New Yorker has opened up its archive for the rest of summer free of charge. The repository houses issues dating back to 2007 that will be displayed with the magazine's responsive layout, tidied-up look and larger images. Once the trial is up, the publisher's paywall will be similar to that of The New York Times -- unpaid web visitors can read a set number of articles, with paid subscribers gaining full access. Before now, the magazine allowed unlimited perusal of free stories while those marked as paid content remained locked away. No word on exactly when the free admission period is up, so you'll want to take advantage before the leaves start changing.

[Photo credit: Chris Hondros/Getty Images]

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First, the good news: At its Television Critics Awards, Fox just announced the details of its plan to put every episode of The Simpsons online for streaming (also, Louie and Fargo have been renewed). Simpsons World will launch in October and let fans browse episodes, create their own playlists, search for/share clips and more. Before that, the FXX cable channel will run "the longest TV marathon in history" by airing the full 25-season / 552 episode run (just for reference, the first HD episode is S20E10, from 2009) in one shot, 24 hours a day, plus The Simpsons Movie, from August 21st until September 1st. The bad news? To access more than just clips, you'll need a subscription with a participating cable provider. Simpsons World will live both on the web, and through the FXNow app on iOS, Android, Xbox and other smart TV platforms. From those in attendance, like Max Follmer of Brief, the app sounds very well put together, and will let fans do things like follow along with the script as it was originally written and immediately share quotes.

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Last week, the Smithsonian announced two of J Dilla's production tools would be displayed at the upcoming National Museum of African American History and Culture. Thanks to a donation from his mother (pictured above), the influential artist/producer's custom Minimoog Voyager and Akai Music Production Center (MPC) 3000 Limited Edition will be part of a collection that aims "to explore how popular music helped shape the nation's history and culture politically and socially." Before passing away in 2006, J Dilla worked with A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, The Roots, The Pharcyde and many more, creating unique sounds for each in addition to his own solo work. "Everyone who pays attention to hip-hop has heard J Dilla's work whether they realize it or not," said Timothy Ann Burnside, the museum's popular music historian. "In the very demanding world of hip-hop producers, he was one of the busiest and most sought-after." When the museum opens in 2016, Dilla's instruments will be included in the "Musical Crossroads" exhibit -- one of the venue's 11 inaugural collections. If you're unfamiliar with his work, there's a brief introductory Spotify playlist from our Engadget channel just after the break.

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Vivo Xshot

Want to know why traditionally PC-centric companies like Microsoft are pouring so much energy into their mobile efforts? Look no further than China, which now says that more of its residents are getting online with phones and tablets than PCs. Of the 632 million internet users recorded this June, 83 percent (527 million) were using mobile devices at least some of the time; meanwhile, 81 percent (512 million) hopped on using computers. Internet adoption was almost exclusively driven by ultra-portable gadgets, in fact. While overall internet use grew about 2.3 percent in the space of half a year, the number of mobile surfers jumped by 5.4 percent. The growth pattern suggests that many first-timers don't have a PC at all -- whatever's in their pockets may be the only way they connect to the digital world.

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Dying to know what the top ten best shows from the 1990s are, but just don't have time to click through that Facebook link? That's okay -- the social network's app is about to get a new feature: Save. Think of it like Pocket, but just for Facebook. Links, movies, places, music and more can now be added to a "saved" list by tapping on the item's options drop-down, enabling them to be viewed later through the app's "more" tab. Saved items (like an interesting restaurant) can be re-shared to your friends, and if you forget to check your saved items for too long, Facebook will remind you. The update is rolling out to iOS, Android and web users over the next few days. A simple, but welcome change. Skip on past the break to see the new feature in action.

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Capturing a baseball bat swing with Carnegie Mellon's dome cameras

Conventional 3D motion capture is awkward; even if you don't mind people covered with dots or ping pong balls, you often get just a handful of data points that miss out on subtle movements. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University might just have a more elegant solution in store, though. They've built a geodesic dome whose 480 cameras work in concert to track a whopping 100,000 points without the need for markers. The system uses its abundance of video footage to estimate trajectories based on changes in light, motion and shape, rather than looking for arbitrary cues or interpolating image frames. As you can see in the clips below, the resulting data is both vividly detailed and natural-looking -- you can see individual confetti flakes falling to the ground, and it's easy to follow every nuance of a batter's swing.

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