overview

Designed by French engineer Jacques Lépine, HAPIfork, the world's first smart connected fork, knows how fast you're eating and helps you slow down using a patent-pending technology. By eating slower, you will improve the way you feel after every meal, enhance your digestion and reduce your weight. This smart electronic fork which comes in five fun colors, is part of suite of devices, applications and services from HAPILABS aimed at improving your overall health, well being and happiness.

Critic reviews

6.0
1 review
  • Durability
  • Portability
  • Ease of use
    6.0
  • Design and form factor
    6.0

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User reviews

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  • Durability
  • Portability
  • Ease of use
  • Design and form factor
6.0
The Verge Jan 15, 2014

As much as I wanted to like Hapifork, it promises too much and delivers too little. Ultimately it’s a utensil that will slow you down and make you more aware of how fast you were eating; if you're content spending $99 on a product that does that and only that, the Hapifork is mostly great.

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First Looks

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Engadget Jan 6, 2013

The units themselves feel like weighty travel utensils at first, but don't feel too light or cheap. The brains of the machine are hidden inside, and the end cap is where you'll get access to the USB connection. The handle sheaths are entirely removable for easy cleaning.

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Engadget Apr 17, 2013

It's a mild vibration ... but it's enough to trigger a reaction. By the time I was four bites in, I was making a conscious effort to keep the buzz at bay and, as a result, chewing significantly more before swallowing.

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Laptop Magazine Jan 6, 2013

Despite the thicker handle (which is removable for washing the fork in a dishwasher), the HAPIfork was fairly comfortable to hold. An accompanying Android and iOS app lets you track you meals, too.

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CNET Dec 13, 2013

Using the Hapifork is...well, a mixed bag. You have to execute very specific hand motions: the instructions recommend a downward fork-pierce and an arm lift so that your wrist elevates enough to register the motion. If you scoop your food with your fork, like I often do, the bites don't register.

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SlashGear Jan 6, 2013

What it comes down to is a touch sensitive smart tip that knows you’re eating, how fast, and if you’re chewing long enough. It won’t know what the users is shoveling in their beautiful faces, but it will certainly still try to help you out.

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Pocket-Lint Jan 7, 2013

All-in-all, it's a nice idea, and something a bit different for weight loss. The science seems to back it all up, but it requires users play by the "rules" to get the most from it. So people keen to lose weight should find it useful, those who aren't committed will struggle. But then that's true of...

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Mashable Apr 17, 2013

So is it worth it? I took the HAPIfork out for a meal earlier this week, and found that while the device works as advertised, it may require some customization on the user's part to change any habits. Your eating mileage may vary.

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