April 22nd 2014 8:32 am

overview

The original Lytro camera had a distinct, toy-like appearance that may have not caught the eyes of some photographers. Their newest model, Illum, brings a more traditional feel to Lytro's light field photography software. Priced at $1,500, the Illum has a zoom range of 30 - 250mm and a wide f/2 aperture. The camera will go on sale on July 15th.

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Critic reviews

6.8
3 reviews
  • Image quality
    6.0
  • Video quality
  • Battery life
  • Design and form factor
    8.0
  • Durability
  • Speed (start-up time, lag)
    6.0
  • Ease of use
    6.9

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User reviews

no user reviews yet
  • Image quality
  • Video quality
  • Battery life
  • Design and form factor
  • Durability
  • Speed (start-up time, lag)
  • Ease of use
7.0
The Wall Street Journal Jul 31, 2014

The Illum offers great tools for experimenting, but remains a ways off from being essential for serious photographers. The jury is still out on whether light-field cameras will define a compelling new kind of photography, or be remembered as a fun gimmick.

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7.0
Yahoo Tech Jul 30, 2014

In other words, you’re paying $1,600 for what’s still a one-trick pony. It’s a breathtaking, spectacular trick — but Lytro may be optimistic in imagining how many people will pay to see it.

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6.0
The Verge Jul 30, 2014

Lytro is doing remarkable work and the Illum is another clear step forward in its vision. But it’s not a great camera. Not yet, anyway.

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First Looks

product preview
Engadget Apr 22, 2014

The Lytro Illum looks like something out of a museum or a designer piece from a Parisian fashion house. It's a sleek and stylish thing, with a unibody magnesium chassis that's attached to a gorgeous anodized aluminum lens barrel equipped with both zoom and focusing rings.

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Wired Apr 22, 2014

Beyond its lens and bigger sensor, there are other ways the Illum surpasses Lytro’s original model. For example, because it’s such a different concept than most photographers are accustomed to, the camera has built-in software that color codes the display with depth information.

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Ars Technica Apr 22, 2014

The Illum is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 801, and the SoC's processing power is used to drive a high-resolution sensor that captures about 3.6x the number of light rays that the Illum's predecessor could capture (40 "megarays," versus 11 for the first-generation Lytro).

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TechCrunch Apr 22, 2014

The unibody magnesium chassis keeps the weight down, as does the lighter lens. The sleek design is unfamiliar in a world of buttoned-up cameras. Instead, the Lytro only has two physical buttons and two physical dials.

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Mashable Apr 22, 2014

I got a little hands-on time with a prototype Illum, and as cameras go, it's a chunky monkey. (It weighs 2.07 pounds.) At first glance it looks simply like a hefty DSLR camera, but there are a couple of important differences, aside from sheer size.

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SlashGear Apr 22, 2014

It's too early to say whether the new Lytro will suffer the same issues, though on paper at least the specifications are more promising. A constant f/2.0 aperture over the entire 8x optical zoom (30-250mm equivalent) is a good start, as is the 1/4000 of a second maximum shutter speed.

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VentureBeat Apr 22, 2014

Using a new 40-megaray sensor (the original Lytro’s sensor was only 11-megarays), the Illum offers finer tuning for refocusing images and more advanced 3D viewing possibilities.

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The Verge Apr 22, 2014

The Illum has very little glass, and none of the complicated, expensive aspherical elements that traditional cameras require to reflect light onto the sensor. That's because the Illum isn’t really capturing a photograph in any traditional sense when you press the button.

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How it stacks up

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