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If there are any doubts left that health care data breaches are a major problem, the medical industry just put them to rest. Researchers have published a study showing that a whopping 29.1 million American health records were compromised between 2010 and 2013. Most of them (58 percent) were expose...

3 days ago 0 Comments
April 14, 2015 at 11:38PM
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Just because you can collect a lot of information about your health doesn't mean that you can easily make sense of it. How do you connect the dots between, say, your smartwatch and your medical records? IBM thinks it has the answer: it's launching Watson Health Cloud, a platform that uses the comp...

4 days ago 0 Comments
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Doctors dream of injecting cells with large nanoscopic cargo to treat or study illnesses. The existing approach to this is extremely slow, however. At one cell per minute, it would take ages to get a meaningful payload. That won't be a problem if UCLA scientists have their way, though -- they've d...

6 days ago 0 Comments
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People living in far-flung locations, especially in developing nations, could always use affordable tests for various diseases that enable remote diagnosis. Take for instance, this new two-part biosensing platform developed by a team of scientists from Florida Atlantic University, which can detect...

10 days ago 0 Comments
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It's tough identifying Parkinson's disease in its early stages -- there are no standard lab tests to diagnose it and symptoms are subtle. A group of MIT researchers believe the answer could lie in something a lot of people already use: the computer keyboard. They've recently conducted a study prov...

15 days ago 0 Comments
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The ARC pen pictured above might look laughably large, but it could be the perfect option for folks with Parkinson's disease. It was created by a group of students from UK's Royal College of Art and the Imperial College London to combat a Parkinson's symptom called micrographia. That's characteriz...

18 days ago 0 Comments
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What do you get when you mix leeks, garlic, wine and bull gall, then ferment it in a copper pot for nine days? In the Anglo-Saxon era, this concoction made a terrific treatment for eye styes but recently researchers have found it equally effective against the scourge of modern medicine: antibiotic...

18 days ago 0 Comments
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Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have developed a high-tech solution to the bane of adolescence: acne. Acne occurs when the skin's pores become clogged. Conventional remedies generally involve stripping the skin of sebum -- the waxy substance naturally produced by pores that makes your skin waterpr...

21 days ago 0 Comments
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As a rule, bionic hands are clunky contraptions made of motors, pneumatics and other machinery that just can't be as elegant as the real thing. Germany's Saarland University might just change that, however. Its researchers have developed an artificial hand that uses smart nitinol (nickel titanium)...

24 days ago 0 Comments
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This isn't some long lost Jackson Pollock, it's what's going on inside the mind of a fruitfly. Life really does imitate art, as this incredible collection of medical images from Wellcome Images illustrates. These spectacular shots leverage modern medicine's most advanced imaging techniques while p...

28 days ago 0 Comments
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A team at Stanford's School of Medicine has reportedly uncovered a potent new treatment method for combating one of leukemia's most aggressive forms -- and they did it pretty much by accident. While survival rates for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a particularly nasty form of white blood ce...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Light therapy is a safe, easy way to kill cancer and treat other diseases, but it's normally limited by its nature to illnesses that are skin-deep. Washington University researchers aren't daunted, however. They've developed a phototherapy method that brings light directly to tumor cells, no matte...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Alzheimer's is a degenerative disease often characterized by severe memory loss, and even though it affects more than 5 million people in the United States (with an uptick expected as the Baby Boomer generation ages), it remains notoriously difficult to treat. The University of Queensland reports ...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Were you stuck at work when Apple kicked off its "spring forward" event and missed out on the whole shebang? Relax. As is its custom, Cupertino has posted a replay of the event so that you can tune in on your own terms. Just make sure you have a good hour and a half if you're bent on seeing the wh...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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What's the best way for stroke patients to gain back full control of their hands and arms? If you ask this particular team of University at Hertfordshire researchers, they'll tell you it's with the help of a robotic glove called SCRIPT or Supervised Care and Rehabilitation Involving Personal Tele-...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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There's no doubt that doctors would prefer to treat cancer as soon as they spot it, and it looks like nanotechnology might give them that chance. Researchers at the University of Leeds have successfully tested gold nanotubes that are useful for both imaging and destroying cancer cells. Since the t...

2 months ago 0 Comments
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If you want to see how animal embryos grow in eggs, you typically have to poke a hole in the egg and patch it up later. That's not always safe, and it may give you an incomplete picture of what's going on. Scientists at Beijing's Tsinghua University think they have a better solution, though. They'...

2 months ago 0 Comments
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A dongle created by Columbia University researchers can turn any smartphone (whether iPhones or Android devices) into an HIV and syphilis tester. Even better, it only takes 15 minutes and a tiny drop of blood to get a result -- the device doesn't even need a battery to work. According to the paper...

2 months ago 0 Comments