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While nothing can replace the companionship of a guide dog, technology can help make treks through busy cities a lot less stressful and more enjoyable for the visually impaired. Microsoft, for one, is currently testing a new headset (developed with help from UK charity Guide Dogs) that uses 3D sou

1 month ago 0 Comments
November 6, 2014 at 12:58AM
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This year, Panasonic's pretty much gone all out with a vast range of gadgets. Tablets, TVs, Touch Pens, cameras, and outrageous Hi-Fi. One smaller addition to the company's portfolio was a pair of bone conducting Bluetooth headphones. The technology isn't exactly new, but as more and more companie

1 year ago 0 Comments
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It's time to give your pockets a rest. Take a cue from Parsons student Aisen Chacin and stick your MP3 player where it belongs: in your mouth. The catchily-named Play-a-Grill combines bone-conducting music playback with a classic bit of bling-based technology. This \"attempt to provide an unusual d

2 years ago 0 Comments
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We've already seen the principle of bone conduction be applied to headphones, but Sonitus Medical is taking the idea to a whole new level with its SoundBite dental hearing aid, which has just received the necessary European CE Mark certification (it already has FDA approval). As you can probably su

3 years ago 0 Comments
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This one slipped right under our radar, but some Sprint stores have already started taking delivery of the awesome Motorola Endeavor HX1 headset -- so at least one part of the rumor calling it out as a $159.99 Sprint exclusive was true. Fortunately, the pricing part of the rumor was false, because

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Now that every kid on planet Earth is attempting to mimic the once-heroic Michael Phelps, it's only fair to equip them with the very best in training tools. FINIS, the same firm that's been cranking out bone conducting underwater MP3 players for years on end, has finally branched out a bit with the

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Last year, we were told by a source very close -- nay, very very close -- to Motorola that the Invisio Q7 design that the company had bought from Nextlink (which has since renamed itself Invisio, ironically) would see release by summer of 2008. Well, we're into spring of 2009 at this point and ther

5 years ago 0 Comments
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We've learned from a source close to the project that Motorola is planning on rolling out a bone conduction headset \"this summer\" based on Nextlink's technology. This totally jibes with recent news that Moto and Nextlink had partnered up -- and furthermore, that the long-overdue Invisio Q7 would be

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Remember the Sound Leaf? Unless you live in Japan, there's a very good chance you don't, so let us refresh your memory: it's a rather interesting Bluetooth device that looks a bit like a miniature handset and functions as a bone-conduction receiver for taking calls in noisy environments. It's a coo

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Wow, we'd darned near forgotten about this thing. Remember the Invisio Q7, Nextlink's hot little bone conduction number from mid '06 that was promised for delivery by the end of the year? Yeah, it never showed up -- until now. It may not be for sale just yet, but at least a few folks at the FCC hav

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Those who got a kick (ahem) out of MyDo's Bururu glasses will surely appreciate the firm's latest spectacles, which seem to function pretty much like Oakley's Thump sans the tint. The eyeSonics reportedly utilizes \"bone conduction speaker equipment,\" non-slip arms, a 3.5-millimeter input (no Blueto

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We've seen plenty of ideas and even a patent related to the employment of human skin in the transport of data. We've also seen our fair share of bone conducting audio products come to market in the last few years. Now in a synthesis of the two, scientists at Rice University have developed a techniqu

7 years ago 0 Comments
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It's taken 'em nearly three years to get around to it, but Finis have a new version of their SwiMP3 underwater MP3 player coming out. Like the original, the SwiMP3 v2 uses bone conduction, rather than regular earphones, to transmit sound directly from your cheek bone to your inner ear (it all sound

7 years ago 0 Comments
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TEAC's latest headphones may not sport the sexiest of designs, but the HP-F100s do tout the always-fun bone conducting abilities. Aside from delivering frequencies from 25Hz to 25kHz, the phones also come with a \"personal amplifier\" (shown after the break) that cranks out .76-watts to each channel,

7 years ago 0 Comments