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The UK is about to launch one of the more ambitious attempts at using genetic research to fight cancer and other nasty diseases. The National Health Service's England branch plans to collect and sequence the genomes of 100,000 people in hopes of understanding both how DNA affects these sicknesses

3 days ago 0 Comments
December 23, 2014 at 6:07AM
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While more and more technology companies are shifting their focus to include health tracking, none go quite as in-depth as 23andMe. The self-branded \"personal genetics company\" made its name in the US and Canada for mail-order DNA test kits that provide customers with an overview of their genetic

24 days ago 0 Comments
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Most bands release a new album as MP3s, and on both CD and vinyl. If you caught any of OK Go's music videos, you know they prefer to do things a little differently. In addition to the aforementioned formats, the band plans release its latest album Hungry Ghosts as DNA. Yep, that's right, nanograms

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Scientists from MIT have figured out how to hack living cells to store biological events around them. They modified E. Coli cells to generate so-called retrons -- a type of mutated single-strand DNA -- in response to stimuli like light or chemicals. Those lo-fi \"memories\" can then be read back to

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Genome testing gear doesn't get a lot of love. Like a lot of lab equipment, it tends to be ugly and unwieldy -- it's not designed with the same elegance as the smartphone in your pocket. Mercifully, the crew at Fluidigm appears to have solved those problems in one shot with its Juno genotyping mac

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Back in 2012, a UK company called Oxford Nanopore announced a chewing gum packet-sized DNA sequencer, something that people found hard to believe since rival machines can be as big as fridges. After dealing with technical issues and bugs (as well as being accused of launching vaporware), Oxford ha

3 months ago 0 Comments
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Once upon a time, sequencing your genome was a prohibitively expensive proposition -- mapping out your genetic code cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and the practical applications of the data were few and far between. These day the process is so affordable that health care professionals are s

4 months ago 0 Comments
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Realistically, we'll probably never successfully clone a dinosaur -- but if we ever do, we may be surprised by how the beast turns out. A fossil found in Siberia threatens to change our perception of what history's giant lizards may have looked like. We already know that not all dinosaurs were sca

5 months ago 0 Comments
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Real vegan cheese. An oxymoron, but maybe not for long. A group of biohackers, which is a thing now, reckon they can make cheese without milk. Better still, it apparently tastes like proper, legitimate cheese, and not some vegan-friendly substitute mess. The SF-based iGEM group say it's made from

5 months ago 0 Comments
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You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on t

7 months ago 0 Comments
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You might know where your forebears lived a few generations prior, but how about the exact village they came from -- 1,000 years ago? Thanks to DNA sequencing, it's now possible to find that out in many cases according to researchers from the University of Sheffield in the UK. The aptly-named GPS

7 months ago 0 Comments
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Despite how far we've come with technology, malaria is still a serious threat for huge chunks of the developing world. A prototype tool from UK-outfit QuantuMDx, however, could help stave off mosquito-related deaths by giving health-workers the power to diagnose the disease in 10 - 15 minutes. As

8 months ago 0 Comments
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Even a decade ago, sequencing a genetic code would set you back around $250,000. The target, of course, has been to crunch that figure down to a more reasonable sum, and now a company believes that it can do it for just $1,000 a go. Illumina Inc. has announced that the $10 million HiSeq X Ten kit

11 months ago 0 Comments