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Google will soon close its Russian engineering offices and relocate 50-odd employees, according to The Information. The search giant didn't say why it made the move, but it may have been prompted by a recent crackdown on internet freedoms within the nation. Russia recently passed a law forcing blo

12 days ago 0 Comments
December 12, 2014 at 4:29AM
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We've seen some overly elaborate invisibility cloaks in our day, but Duke engineers have shown that lo-fi may be best for audio. After much refinement, they've developed a shield that can hide objects from sound waves thanks to a highly engineered pyramid shape and carefully placed holes. The stac

9 months ago 0 Comments
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I'm guessing by the fact that you're reading this that maybe you like Engadget. What I'm hoping is that you also happen to be an engineer who loves working on highly visible, globally-used products with massive scale. If so, give us a shout! Positions are based in SF, and besides working on the b

1 year ago 0 Comments
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HP's webOS team has been keeping busy with its open source project, but it's time for a new challenge in the form of Gram: a fresh HP-funded offshoot focused on \"software, user experience, the cloud, engineering, and partnering.\" We're not quite sure where that list could lead, but webOS, Enyo and

2 years ago 0 Comments
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What does a fish look for in a leader? No doubt a nice fishy smell is important, and maybe a sense of direction too, but the overriding factor happens to be something much simpler, and indeed simple enough for a robot to mimic. Our old friend Maurizio Porfiri and a colleague from New York's Polytec

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Engineers at the University of Pennsylvania have flipped the switch on a new type of computer circuit. Unlike conventional silicon, the new chip uses light -- not electricity -- to perform its logic. By creating an array of nano-rods, light-flow can be treated like voltage and current. These rods c

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Color us a yellow shade of mendacious, but if we designed something that works 99.999999999997 percent of the time, we'd probably round off and give ourselves a big ol' 100 percent A+. We'd probably throw in a smiley faced sticker, too. Computer scientist Holger Hermanns, however, is a much more

3 years ago 0 Comments
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Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have come up with a way to produce electricity from just about the most renewable source known to man -- his own breath. It's all thanks to a plastic microbelt developed by engineers Xudong Wang, Chengliang Sun and Jian Shi. Made of a material known

3 years ago 0 Comments