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Graphene seems to be the new millennium's wonder material: it can be used to build more powerful processors, more efficient solar cells, better sounding headphones and, apparently, can even be deep-fried to create long-lasting batteries. Now, researchers at Rice University think that a "3D" varian...

July 15th 2015 at 6:04pm 0 Comments
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Don't like that your Galaxy S6 conks out before you're finished for the day? Samsung might offer some relief in the future. Its scientists have developed lithium-ion battery technology that promises much longer-lasting power packs. They use a silicon anode (which promises much more capacity than a...

June 27th 2015 at 9:27pm 0 Comments
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Forget LED light bulbs... in the future, your lighting may be made from carbon. Columbia University researchers have built a light bulb chip that superheats graphene to produce illumination. While that's the same basic concept that you see in an incandescent bulb, the graphene filament measures...

June 17th 2015 at 5:04pm 0 Comments
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Orb spider silk, already among the toughest and strongest materials found in nature, could soon get a super-strong nanoscale upgrade. A research team from the University of Trento, Italy recently sprayed 15 Orb-weaving spiders, members of the Pholcidae family, with carbon nanotube or graphene part...

May 5th 2015 at 9:12pm 0 Comments
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Though graphene is noted for its beautiful symmetry, when you add a few warts and imperfections, it becomes more interesting -- specifically, it has the potential to make fuel cells better and cheaper. Scientists from Northwestern University and other institutions were toying with the material as...

March 18th 2015 at 11:32am 0 Comments
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Step aside, graphene, "silicene" is the trendy new nano-material in town that could one day supercharge future tech. Scientists have created the world's first transistor out of the silicon-based material, and it's a mere one atom thick. Unlike its much-maligned graphene cousin -- which has yet liv...

February 5th 2015 at 12:32pm 0 Comments
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The deep frying process isn't just useful for livening up your food -- it might also be the ticket to better batteries in your mobile devices. South Korean researchers have created highly conductive, stable electrode materials by spraying graphene oxide droplets into a very hot blend of acid and...

January 18th 2015 at 11:52pm 0 Comments
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Here's another new use for graphene (that will probably never happen): stopping bullets. University of Massachusetts-Amhers researchers have found that everybody's favorite potential wonder-material vastly outperforms steel and even kevlar armor. Testing the ultra-lightweight, 1-atom thick carbon...

November 28th 2014 at 5:59pm 0 Comments
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Someday, you might be able to stick a temporary tattoo on your skin that's wired to light up or act as a display -- one that's made out of hybrid graphene. If you regularly read Engadget, then you're most likely familiar with graphene: It's that ultra-thin miracle material companies and researcher...

October 27th 2014 at 3:02am 0 Comments
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Neural activity maps frequently present an incomplete picture of how a brain works; you can measure electrical activity, stimulate it or visualize the anatomy, but you can't do all three. DARPA and the University of Wisconsin might just pull off that seemingly impossible feat, however. They rece...

October 21st 2014 at 1:36pm 0 Comments
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It's very tough to find light beyond certain frequencies. If you want to see elusive terahertz waves, for example, you have to get a system that's either really slow or needs to be kept at a temperature near absolute zero -- not exactly practical. The University of Maryland's scientists have a bet...

September 8th 2014 at 6:42am 0 Comments
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Forget lab-made materials like graphene -- natural, old-fashioned hemp may be the ticket to our energy future. Researchers have demonstrated that you can make very efficient carbon electrodes simply by heating hemp bast fibers in a two-stage process. The resulting substance holds as much energy...

August 13th 2014 at 12:58pm 0 Comments