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It's not as hard to make an invisibility cloak as you might think, but making one that's truly sophisticated is another matter; metamaterials (substances that change the behavior of light) are hard to build. Rice University appears to have solved part of the problem, however. It just developed a

3 months ago 0 Comments
September 15, 2014 at 6:53PM
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Forget old and busted X-rays, T-rays are the future, man! It was only recently that we were discussing Terahertz lasers and their potential to see through paper, clothes, plastic, flesh, and other materials, but that discourse had to end on the sad note that nobody had managed to make them usable i

4 years ago 0 Comments
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Those HDTV manufacturers did tell us that 3D was going to be everywhere this year, didn't they? Keeping up with the times, scientists investigating potential methods for rendering physical objects invisible to the human eye have now moved to the full three-dimensional realm. The Karlsruhe Institute

4 years ago 0 Comments
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You know those invisibility cloaks scientists have been struggling to master for decades? This here is said cloak's perfect opposite, and it's bending our minds in ways you can hardly fathom. Ulf Leonhardt, a professor at the University of St. Andrews, has worked with a brilliant team of scientists

5 years ago 0 Comments
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There has been plenty of research into cloaking devices, but while scientists are still working their way towards the visible light spectrum they seem to be having the best luck with microwaves. Most recently, a new metamaterial made from over 10,000 individual pieces of fiberglass has been used to

5 years ago 0 Comments
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There has been plenty of research into cloaking devices, but while scientists are still working their way towards the visible light spectrum they seem to be having the best luck with microwaves. Most recently, a new metamaterial made from over 10,000 individual pieces of fiberglass has been used to

5 years ago 0 Comments
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We're only at the nano scale folks so you'll have to keep those high school fantasies of an invisibility-cloaked romp through the girls' locker room tucked away for now. Still, two teams of US government funded researchers under the direction of Xian Zhanga at UC Berkeley say that they've developed

6 years ago 0 Comments
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We've got next-to-invisible objects and cameras with ridiculously large sensors, and thanks to a team of brilliant researchers over in Germany, now we've got \"an exotic material with a negative refractive index for visible light.\" Gunnar Dolling and his colleagues at the University of Karlsruhe in G

8 years ago 0 Comments
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In a breakthrough that could benefit fields as diverse as networking, photography, astronomy, and peeping, science-types at Japan's Institute of Physical and Chemical Research have unveiled their prototype of a glass-like material that they claim to be 100% transparent. Unlike normal glass, which re

8 years ago 0 Comments