Post Thumbnail

D-Wave has had little trouble lining up customers for its quantum computer, but questions have persisted as to whether or not the machine is performing quantum math in the first place. University of Southern California researchers have tested Lockheed Martin's unit to help settle that debate, and

1 year ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Whether or not D-Wave has actually built a quantum computer is still a matter of debate (though, a study authored by the company and published in Nature claims to prove its success) but, whatever it is these crafty Canadians have created, you can order one now and start crunching qubits with aban

3 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Yeah, we're still hanging around playing Q*bert and waiting on folks to get those qubits a spinning. Meanwhile, researchers have found a new path to follow on the way to quantum enlightenment. A new, darker path, which entails the use of so-called dark excitons as quantum bits. While doubling as a g

4 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

We've already seen at least one (sort of) functional quantum processor, and one breakthrough after the other in quantum computing, but it looks like some researchers at Ohio State University have now made a breakthrough of their own that could possibly speed things up considerably. The big news ther

5 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

You know, at some point we're going to grow tired of just getting closer and demand that we arrive, but thankfully for a smattering of UK-based researchers, we're not yet to that point. Reportedly, brainiacs from Edinburgh and Manchester University have created a molecular machine that could be used

5 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

One of the many challenges facing quantum computing is finding a practical material from which to process the quantum information -- the material must not be so exotic such that it becomes too prohibitive and expensive to use for mass calculations. That's why a recently discovered hidden magnetic \"q

7 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

NASA has confirmed that it built a quantum computer under contract for Canadian startup company D-Wave Systems Inc. after D-Wave was accused of faking a recent demonstration to businesses and academia. During a demonstration last month, the company revealed that its 16 qubit (more qubits = more proc

7 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

As expected, Canada's D-Wave Systems has announced \"the world's first commercially viable quantum computer,\" and they seem to be pretty stoked about it. The achievement is notable, since they've managed to build a whole 16 qubit computer that actually does some simple computations, even if it's far

7 years ago 0 Comments