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Gene Roddenberry would have you believe that space is the final frontier. But really, the deep blue sea is more apt for that distinction. And without mega-rich hobbyists to fund exploratory plunges into those uncharted depths, science has had to seek out an alternative, more cost-effective means.

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Okay, so they still look like Depression-era bath toys, but Maurizio Porfiri's robot fish have come a long way from the coconut-and-tin-foil look they were sporting last summer. In an attempt to further \"close the loop\" between robotics and nature, Porfiri has continued to tinker with the little le

3 years ago 0 Comments
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Robotic fish. The phrase alone sends shivers of excitement down our collective spines here at Engadget. Undoubtedly, Michigan State University assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering Xiaobo Tan feels similarly, as he has designs on creating an army of them. The researcher has dev

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Alright, so it may not be quite as terrifying as something like Carnegie Mellon's robotic snake or NC State's remote-control bats, but this so-called Gymnobot from the University of Bath does boast some animal-mimicking abilities of its own and, if all goes as planned, it could eventually grow a wh

5 years ago 0 Comments
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MIT has been at this robotic fish lark for a long, long time, and its latest iteration is a true testament to all the effort and energy put in. The first prototype, 1994's Robotuna, was four feet long and had 2,843 parts driven by six motors, whereas the new robofish is no longer than a foot, carri

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Look, we never claimed to be fish-ologists or anything like that, but we really don't have the foggiest idea of how this thing works. Sure, it has rechargeable batteries for up to 24 hours of swimming, and ultrasound for object avoidance, and even a cool robotic-fish sounding name: \"POPO.\" We're ju

7 years ago 0 Comments