The art of automotive zen begins with a clean and orderly interior (for most drivers) and this week's giveaway is sure to help provide a more cable-free ride. The case, cradle and charger folks at iOttie have done us a solid by offering two Engadget readers the new Easy Flex Wireless car charger and a Nexus 5 smartphone. This Qi-enabled, dash-mountable charger will help drivers keep their hands at two and ten nine and three like they're supposed to, while still providing visibility for turn-by-turn directions and a steady stream of juice. The charger's sticky gel pad will keep Google's latest handset from taking a dive to the floorboards and the device will even work with other Qi-compatible smartphones. All you need to do is head down to the Rafflecopter widget below for up to three chances at winning one of these prize packs. You never know, a little dose of automotive feng shui could turn that long nightmare of a commute into some peaceful "me" time.

Update: PSA - The DMV has apparently changed its age old hands-on-the-steering wheel specifications. Drive safe kids and be sure to keep your hands at nine and three instead. The more you know...

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We can't help you with the lights or the action, but the professional video folks at V.I.O. will provide the camera for one lucky Engadget reader this week. We have one V.I.O. Stream Battery System, which is a seriously rugged little POV shooter capable of capturing and streaming 1080p HD video using the Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP). It's waterproof, dustproof and shockproof (earning it an IP67 environmental standard rating), so it can handle all the extreme action you want to throw at it. And the battery add-on, which is included in this model, lets you roam free and capture footage for up to two and a half hours on a charge without any wired entanglements. Whether its documenting base jumps, birthday parties or kickstarting a budding film career, this HD video camera is up to the task. All you need to do is head on down to the Rafflecopter widget below for up to three chances at winning this V.I.O. Stream Battery System.

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The modern workforce is a global one, but you still need to get in some face time with co-workers and associates far and wide. ClickMeeting want's to help one lucky Engadget reader keep that personal connection and spread their message by offering an iPad mini and six months of its ClickWebinar service. This will help you make presentations to your team or dole out advice to interested clientele, and with mobile apps for iOS, Android and BlackBerry, the software lets you do it from any location. So whether it's slurping down civet lattes at the corner cafe or direct from your kitchen table, you can get your message to the masses -- and they don't have to know you're still wearing pajama bottoms. Simply head down to the Rafflecopter widget below for up to three chances at winning this iPad mini and ClickWebinar combo.

Winner: congratulations to David R., Charlotte, NC

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An invitation to see a "future restaurant" covered in highfalutin tech concepts was shaping up to be a highlight of our week. According to Recruit Advanced Technology Lab's teaser, it was going to encompass smartglasses, augmented reality, gesture interfaces, customer face identification, avatars, seamless wireless payments and more, all hosted at Eggcellent, a Tokyo restaurant that... specializes in egg cuisine.

The demonstrations might not have reached the polished levels of the dreamy intro video, but the concept restaurant at least attempted to keep all of its demos grounded in reality. iBeacons through Bluetooth for food orders and payments, iPads that interacted with a conveyor-belt order projection, Wii Remotes that transform normal TVs into interactive ones and a Kinect sensor to upgrade Japan's maid café waitresses into goddesses -- well, at least that's one idea.

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Engadget giveaway: win a Samsung Galaxy S 4 and blinged-out Galaxy Gear courtesy of Brilliance!

You've tricked out your ride, splurged on some curves for your home theater and even recreated that floating Burnquist ramp for extreme weekend fun, but there's still something missing. The gem and jewelry purveyors at Brilliance have just the thing; they've provided an unlocked Samsung Galaxy S 4 and bundled it with a gemstone-studded Galaxy Gear, so that one lucky Engadget reader (or someone near and dear) can rock a bit of bling like the stars. Brilliance offers gemstone customization for a variety of gadgets and has recently worked with Samsung to create shiny custom wearables for celebrities like Jennifer Hudson. You get to choose the color of the Galaxy Gear and take your pick of real-life gems, so you can rock your rocks while wearing your tech -- Xzibit would be proud. To get a chance at winning this sparkly wrist machine and life companion smartphone, you'll need to enter via the Rafflecopter widget below. Go ahead, it might just be your chance to shine.

Winner: congratulations to Shanaan C., Fort McMurray, AB

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For many Engadget readers, part of the work day consists of telling co-workers to "move" so they can get in there and fix the computer -- after advising a restart, of course. So we're offering an IT-centric giveaway this week courtesy of CrushFTP, makers of robust and secure file transfer server software and long-time gadget hackers. They've given us an Apple Mac mini and a full enterprise version of CrushFTP for one lucky Engadget reader. This prize pairing provides all the tools necessary for setting up a fully functional file server with a browser-based UI for monitoring and controlling all the exchanges. CrushFTP includes modern HTML5 support, ad-hoc sharing, customizable web forms and a litany of other high-level features to help keep server workflows running smoothly. All it takes is a few clicks and you could be on your way to winning this Apple Mac mini and software package; just head on down to the Rafflecopter widget to enter. You'll barely even have to move yourself.

Winner - congratulations to: Christopher K., Shepherdsville, KY

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It's that time of year again, when you have to try and wrestle back as many of those hard-earned dollars as you can from the insatiable gaping maw of the tax beast. In an effort to assuage that annual suffering, the folks at TurboTax created the free SnapTax app for 1040EZ/A returns and this year they've upped the ante for one lucky Engadget reader by offering an unlocked gold iPhone 5s so they can file on the go. Available for iOS and Android, the SnapTax app lets users file by simply snapping a photo of their W-2, answering a few questions and clicking "file my return." This is one little slab of gold that you won't want to stash in a safety deposit box, so head on down to the Rafflecopter widget for up to three chances at winning. And don't forget: It's time to do those taxes!

Winner - congratulations to: Scottie K., Schaumburg, IL

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Welcome to Time Machines, where we offer up a selection of mechanical oddities, milestone gadgets and unique inventions to test out your tech-history skills.

Born out of sci-fi cinema, pulp literature and a general lust for launching ourselves into the wild blue yonder, the real-world Rocket Belt began to truly unfold once the military industrial complex opened up its wallet. In the late 1950s, the US Army's Transportation Research Command (TRECOM) was looking at ways to augment the mobility of foot soldiers and enable them to bypass minefields and other obstacles on the battleground by making long-range jumps. It put out a call to various aerospace companies looking for prototypes of a Small Rocket Lift Device (SRLD). Bell Aerospace, which had built the sound-barrier-breaking X-1 aircraft for the Army Air Forces, managed to get the contract and Wendell Moore, a propulsion engineer at Bell became the technical lead.

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Sure, you share your heart out in food photos and selfies, but providing WiFi to those less fortunate might be more magnanimous. That's where Karma comes in, with its portable WiFi hotspot that pays you back in data for a bit of bandwidth benevolence. The company has provided two Acer C720 Chromebooks and a pair of its Karma WiFi hotspots (1GB bundles) so that two lucky Engadget readers can join in spreading the connectivity. Those in need can hop onto the shared hotspot using their own Karma account, earning both them and their host a cool 100MB in data. Accounts dictate usage, so you get to keep your own pay-as-you-go data safe, while doing your part in opening up the interwebs to those around you. Just head on down to the Rafflecopter widget for up to three chances at winning.

Winners - congratulations to: Shivang V., Duluth, GA; Lin D., Brooklyn, NY

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Welcome to Time Machines, where we offer up a selection of mechanical oddities, milestone gadgets and unique inventions to test out your tech-history skills.

Some humans have enough trouble navigating an apartment without stubbing their toes, and that's with a robust onboard computer, finely tuned sensory apparatuses and years of practice in the field. Shakey was a pioneering bot under the tutelage of the SRI Artificial Intelligence Center's (AIC) research team, and it would take its share of bumps and wrong turns as it learned its way around the lab. It was born in 1966 as an artificial intelligence project to develop robots with the ability to navigate real-world environments and make decisions on the fly in order to overcome obstacles and solve complex problems. Life magazine even gave Shakey the title of "first electronic person" for its efforts in a 1970 article, vaulting it to near peer-level status with its toe-crunching creators.

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The winter doldrums may be leaving you in a funk, but the team at EVGA have offered to heat things up with this slam dunk of a giveaway. EVGA's given us a stack of its Tegra Note 7 tablets to help five lucky Engadget readers coast all the way into spring and then some. There's a lot of power under the hood of this 7-inch slate courtesy of its NVIDIA Tegra 4 chip and that gives it some serious gaming chops. On top of that, the tablet boasts DirectStylus tech for responsive pen interaction, PureAudio front-facing speakers and an HDMI output for when you want to take media and games to the big screen. Simply head down to the Rafflecopter widget and get to clicking for up to three chances at winning!

Winners - congratulations to: Anthony B., Los Angeles, CA; Gary T., Coldwater, MI; Carmen T., Naples, FL; Monte S., Salt Lake City, UT; Ben M., Brunswick, ME

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Welcome to Time Machines, where we offer up a selection of mechanical oddities, milestone gadgets and unique inventions to test out your tech-history skills.

You're perched atop a motorcycle, cruising through Brooklyn with the wind whipping through your hair. A faint waft of indefinable city-funk hits your nose and the rumbling of the engine rattles your backside. Then your tokens run out. You've just experienced the Sensorama Simulator, a machine from 1962 that played a 3D film along with stereo sound, aromas and wind in order to create an immersive sensory environment. It was one of many 3D-related creations that visionary inventor and cinematographer Morton Heilig gave the world. His ideas for adding layers of sensory stimuli to augment a simple cinema presentation led the way towards today's "virtual reality" experiences.

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Welcome to Time Machines, where we offer up a selection of mechanical oddities, milestone gadgets and unique inventions to test out your tech-history skills.

Machines may need to start a union. After all, various deep thinkers have been busy for more than a century dreaming up ways to impart human-like thought processes and capabilities into them, just so they can do more of our work. Familiar names in the annals of computing's history such as Charles Babbage and Alan Turing may stand out, but wedged between those figures on the historical timeline is the perhaps lesser-known Spanish inventor and engineer Leonardo Torres Quevedo. Of his many inventions, one of the most unique is "El Ajedrecista" (The Chess Player), which he presented to the Parisian public in 1914. It was a chess-playing automaton, programmed to stand against a human opponent and respond accordingly to any move they made. It knew if someone was trying to cheat, and took pride in moving its own playing pieces around the board. Most of all, it reveled in announcing a victory against its human taskmasters when it inevitably won the game.

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Welcome to Time Machines, where we offer up a selection of mechanical oddities, milestone gadgets and unique inventions to test out your tech-history skills.

Conduct an electronic orchestra, right from your living room!

It may seem like a fever dream headline from the 1950s, but the physical results of Max Mathews' years of work in computer music wouldn't fully materialize until the '80s. His Radio Drum (aka Radio Baton) -- although a continual work-in-progress -- was a groundbreaking method of controlling computer-synthesized sound through a predominantly wireless three-dimensional interface. Many of its unique abilities were courtesy of technological visionary Bob Boie's capacitance research, creating "a much more participatory way of enjoying music," as Mathews described in Stanford University's Brainstorm. The Radio Drum could track surface hits and even hovering positions, and use that data to control a multitude of audio parameters. It was one of many projects that Mathews worked on during his lifetime and played a part in earning him the honorary title of "Father of Computer Music."

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Welcome to Time Machines, where we offer up a selection of mechanical oddities, milestone gadgets and unique inventions to test out your tech-history skills.

America was in the middle of a post-war economic boom during the '50s and industries were in a rush to build the future, often with outlandish results. RCA-Whirlpool was busy whipping up the "miracle kitchen," chock-full of mod-cons to make the Jetsons jealous, and Simplicity Mfg. Co.'s air-conditioned, bubble-domed lawnmowers arrived to ease the painful process of landscaping. General Electric (GE), a longtime hotbed of innovation and research, had various projects underway, including engineer Ralph Mosher's Cybernetic Anthropomorphic Machine Systems (CAMS). Mosher was building man-amplifying tools that would allow users to control robotic appendages with natural human movement. Not to be left out, the US Army was plotting the future of rough- and remote-terrain vehicles, and it had its eye on GE and Mosher's work.

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