Adafruit explains how to build your very own HAL 9000 replica for less than $100

It may be 2013, but 2001 will forever hold a special place in our hearts, in no small part due to the that lovable, red-eyed supercomputer known as HAL 9000. ThinkGeek has given us a couple ways to purchase HAL for our homes, but for folks who'd rather build their own, Adafruit's got you covered. User Phillip Burgess has posted the full instructions on how to craft one, provided you've got access to a laser cutter and the requisite soldering, spray painting and sanding chops to complete the task. Adafruit's version will have you making HAL out of an oversized arcade button and a sheet of acrylic -- and if you want your HAL to talk (and really, why wouldn't you), you'll need to build a voice box from an Arduino Uno board and an Adafruit Wave Shield. Total cost: just shy of $100. Check out the video of it in action after the break, and head on down to the source link for the full how-to. Oh, and feel free to whistle Sprach Zarathustra while you work.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

CircuitBee
Instructables is great, don't get us wrong, but if you're just looking for a sweet new Arduino project or a super-charged Atari Punk Console, wading through the piles of Lego swords and wreath-making tips can be frustrating. Enter CircuitBee, a document sharing site dedicated to one thing, and one thing only -- schematics. It's kind of like Scribd but, instead of being loaded with court documents and shoddy how-to books, it features user-uploaded circuit diagrams to get you started on your next soldering and etching project. The selection at the site is rather sparse at the moment, but since it's only in alpha we'll cut it some slack. Check out the site at the source link, and don't be surprised if a few submissions from your favorite Engadget writers start popping up.

0 Comments


It happens every December. You head home for the holidays only to be accosted by parents who need help fixing their computers. This year, it looks like Google will be lending a hand with its unannounced Teach Parents Tech series of public service videos. The Google-registered website teachparentstech.org still shows a "coming soon..." graphic and the videos remain unlisted on YouTube, but that shouldn't stop you from sending the source link below to your parents right now. At the moment, we're counting 54 cross-platform how-to videos hosted by real live Google employees. The videos are brief (less than a minute) covering topics as simple as "how to copy and paste" and "how to attach a file to an email" to more advanced sessions covering "how to setup an email autoresponder" and even "how to find cheap flights." Unfortunately, even Google can't explain to parents how to create a FAT32 hard drive partition. See what we mean after the break.

Update: And it's live. Might as well get in the gift-giving spirit, eh?

[Thanks, Nathan G.]

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

I used to love Facebook. I was in law school at Wisconsin when it launched, and everyone I knew on the site was basically a peer -- people who I'd known well or at least met in person at some point. Then... I graduated. Suddenly having a Facebook account full of pictures from blurry nights in Madison and Pulitzer Prize-caliber dirty jokes from my friends wasn't so awesome anymore -- especially once I started working for Engadget and lots and lots of people I didn't actually know (or, somewhat even worse, only knew professionally) started looking at my personal page. So I needed a system -- a way to still use Facebook to share personal stuff with friends, professional stuff with colleagues, and awesome stuff with everyone, all without blurring any lines or accidentally sharing too much with people I don't know.

Luckily, it's not so hard to do -- you just have to make effective use of a Facebook feature called Lists. By grouping all your friends into lists you can make sure you're sharing the right information with the right people -- pictures from last night's epic party with your actual friends, sanitized vacation photos with co-workers, almost nothing with strangers. But just making a bunch of random lists won't work -- you need a plan, and we've got one for you that involves making just three lists to solve all your Facebook privacy worries. How? Read on for step-by-step instructions.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

0

Sure, it took Facebook a little too long to realize its users wanted easy-to-use privacy controls instead of an ever-increasing array of complex and granular settings that most people ignored until it was too late and photographic evidence of their rampant immorality was being emailed directly to their employers, but even the new system has some quirks, and it's always going to be up to you to manage what information you're publishing. It's not complicated stuff, but we promise you a quick peek at this little intro course our friends at Switched put together will be worth it in the end -- you don't want Spring Break 2006 to ruin your life all over again, do you?

0 Comments