Researchers who must be Saved by the Bell fans have developed clothing fibers that could turn you into a walking neon sign. Rather than OLED or LCD tech, the team exploited polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs) that are rugged enough to be used in fabrics. They created a millimeter-sized fiber that's an alphabet soup of tech -- it consists of a thin steel wire coated with nanoparticles and an electroluminescent polymer, topped by see-through carbon nanotubes. The prototype fabric only glowed for a couple of hours, and so far, the light colors are limited to blue and yellow. However, PLEC tech has a theoretical life span of thousands of hours, and far more hues are possible.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

"Captain, magnetic seals in the anti-matter chamber are decaying!" "Shields up!" Now that we have that out of our systems, let's start by saying that unlike a Star Trek-style deflector, Boeing's plasma "shield" could never block shells or bullets, let alone anti-matter explosions. But if its patent "for shockwave attenuation via electromagnetic arc" ever amounts to anything, it'd still be a technological tour de force. The idea is to harness electrical energy to stop or slow down the shockwaves created by explosions, which can do just as much damage as shrapnel.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

total eclipse

The end is nigh, Engadget readers: a triumvirate of celestial events is happening simultaneously. Okay, that might be a bit of an overstatement, but until we hit the other side of today's supermoon, spring equinox (yay!) and total solar eclipse, we just won't know. As The Wall Street Journal tells it, this sort of thing is "extremely unusual." Total solar eclipses -- where the moon plays middleman and blocks the sun from our view -- happen about once every year-and-a-half. Supermoons and the equinox? A handful of times per year and once annually, respectively.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

There are mere hours left to make your mark on the 11th Annual Engadget Awards. You don't need to select a winner in every category, but voting ends tonight at 11:59PM PT. So get your ass to the polls below and tell us who were the best and worst of 2014.

And keep locked on Engadget.com for more on our very special awards ceremony, debuting next Friday, March 27th. If you hadn't already heard, the competition is rrrrruff...

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Starbucks already has locations on nearly every street corner -- even ones directly across from each other -- but now on-demand delivery service Postmates will grab your coffee and bring it directly to your office, house or basically wherever your mouth is. Postmates plans to roll out its Starbucks delivery routes in the second half of 2015, starting in Seattle. The service wants users to order through the Starbucks mobile app and then tell Postmates to pick up that iced, grande, soy-milk caramel macchiato (with whipped cream) for them.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Though graphene is noted for its beautiful symmetry, when you add a few warts and imperfections, it becomes more interesting -- specifically, it has the potential to make fuel cells better and cheaper. Scientists from Northwestern University and other institutions were toying with the material as a hydrogen fuel cell membrane, and found that by knocking out at least four carbon atoms from the normally pristine structure, it performed vastly better. A large number of protons (and nothing else) slipped through imperfections in the atom-thick material in just a few seconds, efficiently generating electricity.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

In 2013, the Syrian government agreed to destroy its stores of chemical weapons, following reports that it had dropped sarin, a torturous and lethal nerve gas, on a rebel-held town earlier that year. The 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention, signed by 190 nations (including the US and Syria), bars any country from creating, using or storing chemical weapons. Still, activists report even today attacks of chlorine gas in Syria, and chemical weapons remain a global issue. If the world can't eradicate chemical warfare completely, science will try to neutralize it: Today a team from Illinois' Northwestern University outlined the specifics of a manmade compound that inactivates nerve gas within minutes.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

NASA is testing its far-out electric plane concept

NASA's set to test a wing concept it says "may herald (the) future" of electric planes, but it almost looks like a joke -- it has one-third the wing area of a normal aircraft and 18 electric motors. However, the space agency is dead serious about the LEAPTech wing, a joint partnership with two private aerospace companies. It consists of a 31-foot, carbon composite span with tiny motors powered by lithium iron phosphate batteries. After successful testing at slower speeds, NASA will "fly" a wing section aboard a specially-equipped truck at speeds up to 70mph. Eventually, the wing will be mounted to a commercial Tecnam P2006T aircraft and flown by test pilots.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Alzheimer's is a degenerative disease often characterized by severe memory loss, and even though it affects more than 5 million people in the United States (with an uptick expected as the Baby Boomer generation ages), it remains notoriously difficult to treat. The University of Queensland reports an Australian research team recently took an encouraging step toward possible treatment by sending ultrasound waves at the brains of mice with Alzheimer's. In 75 percent of the mice, the waves broke up clusters of an amyloid beta plaque that contributes to the disease's progression, and these mice performed better on subsequent memory and spatial recognition tests.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

0

The nominations are in and the finalists have been selected for the 11th Annual Engadget Awards. Now it's time to select the top dog in each category. Fill out the ballots below to select the best in show and we'll announce the winners later this month during a very special ceremony. You don't need to select a winner in every category, but the polls close Wednesday, March 18th at 11:59PM PT.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

0

Why is Valve getting into virtual reality? Why is Valve making Steam Machines and the Steam Controller? Why did Valve make its own Linux-based operating system? Why did Valve make the Steam Controller? Why is Valve releasing its game engine, Source, for free? It's the Steam economy, stupid!

Valve's game store boasts "over 125 million active accounts worldwide." How does Valve keep growing that store? By literally everything else it does. Here's Valve president Gabe Newell explaining it to us last week at GDC 2015:

"We're trying to build standard interfaces and standard implementations that other people can use. Because, to be honest, we're going to make our money on the back end, when people buy games from Steam. Right? So we're trying to be forward-thinking and make those longer-term investments for PC gaming that are going to come back a couple years down the road."

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

If all goes well, NASA will finally launch its Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observatories tonight. Comprised of four identical spacecraft (shown above in a clean room), its purpose is to study the magnetic fields around Earth for information on how they connect and disconnect. The MMS is headed to areas that scientists believe are the sites where magnetic reconnection occurs, but first it has to get off the ground. The launch is scheduled for 10:44PM ET at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, and all conditions are go. You can watch live on NASA TV, and a stream is embedded after the break.

Update: The launch was successful and the mission is on its way, check after the break for a replay and to see more information on exactly what its satellites will be studying.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

We know: The progress toward NASA using the SLS (or Space Launch System if you aren't into the whole brevity thing) has been painfully slow, starting way back in 2011. Today marks a significant step toward it shooting astronauts into the furthest reaches of space, however -- testing its booster system. The trial run was two minutes long (the same length as it would be during an actual launch) and in those 120 seconds, the Utah-based booster produced 3.6 million pounds of thrust. NASA says this is one of two tests necessary before the system gets cleared for a trip to Kennedy Space Center in Florida, and the next one takes place in early 2016.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Cards Against Humanity is already the naughtiest, nastiest, most hilarious card game for terrible people in physical reality, and now all of that fun is alive in the digital world with Cards Against Originality. It's a free, unofficial web app for phones, tablets and desktops designed by Dawson Whitfield, and it contains every Cards Against Humanity card, including all five expansions. Cards Against Originality is meant to fill in for actual cards if you forget to bring your big, black box to a party -- you still have to be near your friends in the real world to play. Simply start a new game, share the link and get rolling. Plus, it's all completely cool under the original game's Creative Commons license, according to Cards Against Humanity creator Max Temkin.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

It's time have your voices heard. In the dog-eat-dog world of technological innovation ... Ok, ok, enough with the K9 metaphors. Let's just get to the point: Nominations for the 11th Annual Engadget Awards end at midnight PT tonight. We've given you a head start with a few suggestions, but feel free to write in your own in the ballots below -- if you haven't placed your votes already. You don't have to make nominations in every category, but selections should be for products available in 2014.

We'll announce the winners during a very special awards ceremony on March 25th. Let's just say the competition is rrrrruff ...

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments