The set-top box market is currently flooded with many cheap Android boxes, but they tend to offer limited remote access plus expansion capability, so it's about time that something more exciting popped up. One such candidate is the EzeeCube, which aims to be an idiot-proof media hub with three main selling points: Auto-sync content across multiple platforms (Android, iOS, Windows and OS X); simple initial setup for accessing hub content from anywhere; and cable-free expansion that lets you stack up to four modules. We're talking about slapping on an extra hard drive, a Blu-ray drive, a TV tuner and even a retro gaming module that will bring your dusty SNES and Sega Mega Drive / Genesis cartridges back to life. No messy cables here.

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After breaking ground on it more than two years ago, ESPN is finally ready to show viewers the Digital Center 2. In the 194,000-square foot building, located at its Bristol, Connecticut, campus, the sports media giant plans to have a total of five studios, one of which is now officially the new home of SportsCenter. As part of the move, the popular up-to-the-minute news show will be waving goodbye to the old Digital Center 1, a 10-year-old, 120,000-square foot space that has been its home for the past few years. "DC-1 was opened 10 years ago; we were only built for [broadcasting] four to five hours a day. Now we're doing like 17 hours," Rob King, senior vice president at ESPN, told Engadget. "It's been seven years in the making; DC-2 was built to be future-proof." With this in mind, King says the new building is prepared to handle the next wave of technology, whether that be producing content in 4K and 8K, or doing things like adapting shows to be interactive with social media.

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Inside Game 5 of the 2014 NBA Finals

San Antonio is known for a few things: the Alamo, the River Walk and the Spurs. In 2014, as was the case last year, the NBA Finals saw the Miami Heat and San Antonio Spurs battle it out for basketball glory, though this time, the team from Texas had the benefit of home-court advantage. For Game 5, which San Antonio ultimately won, the AT&T Center was a full house (it always is, really), packed with fans and a ton of broadcasters, journalists and other members of the media from all over the world. So what's it like behind the scenes? Let's find out.

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While ASUS continues to impress us with a slew of PCs and mobile devices at Computex, let's not forget that it still makes some nice peripherals. One thing that surprised us at the ASUS booth was a pretty external Blu-ray drive aimed at audio buffs. Dubbed the Blu-ray Prime, this USB 3.0 device claims to be the "world's only optical drive with 7.1-channel audio output," courtesy of the integrated ASUS Xonar sound card, which packs a Cirrus Logic CS4398 DAC and a C-Media CM6631A audio processor, plus optical output. It also features a 600-ohm headphone amplifier and a clean 114dB signal-to-noise ratio. Expect the Blu-ray Prime to hit various markets for about $199 in Q4, after the DVD version is released in Q3 for half the price.

Photos by Zach Honig.

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Given the success of franchises like FIFA and Madden, it's easy to see why EA would want to commit valuable resources to developing an MMA title, a sport that's been getting bigger and bigger over the past few years. But the road for creating this new game, dubbed EA Sports UFC, wasn't an easy one. The relationship between UFC President Dana White and EA had its complications a few years ago. Back then, the developer reportedly wasn't interested in making a title for the mixed martial arts company, which is what started the kerfuffle between them. Because of this, UFC eventually hooked up with THQ to create a game, while EA Sports went on to develop its own MMA series. Still, neither of these things lasted too long. And after the unfortunate demise of THQ, EA Sports eventually reached a deal with UFC, granting it licensing rights for the popular MMA league. The by-product? EA Sports UFC.

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​As a group of journalists huddled together in a function room, deep within a central London hotel, a wide, framed display stands before them. Walled on three sides, a long, Bang & Olufsen-branded curtain hangs across the front-facing section -- clearly hiding whatever product the company has gathered them there to announce. The host spares everyone a long intro, the curtain dramatically drops (was there a small theatrical "pop"? We can't be sure.). As the veil falls to the ground, three fancy looking television sets are revealed, they spring into life, revolving on their stands as if slowly lurching towards the audience. A short, lively video plays. The demo finishes to one, well-intended, solitary clap. Hanging above the TVs, right in the middle it reads: Bang & Olufsen BeoVision Avant "The one that moves." On each screen, as if by way of clarification, the words "Movement with purpose" are displayed. This is how the Danish firm introduces the world to its new 55-inch 4K TV. The one that moves.

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With the world's biggest sporting event, the FIFA World Cup, set to kick off in roughly 37 days, ESPN has now revealed how it plans to deliver coverage to you. At a recent media event in New York City, ESPN President John Skipper and Co. announced that all 64 World Cup matches from Brazil would be streamed live via WatchESPN and ESPN3. Naturally, you'll need a cable subscription (or a certain internet service provider) to have access to the feeds, but the good news is that, since ESPN has full rights to the tournament in the US, you won't be subject to any tedious blackout restrictions. And that includes games broadcasted on ABC. But the sports channel isn't stopping there: ESPN is throwing everything but the kitchen sink at this year's World Cup, with things like 24/7 news coverage and expert analysis, as well as second-screen features for smartphones and tablets.

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Major League Baseball is bringing back a classic. But while resuscitating an old title could sometimes create a double-edged-sword effect of sorts, that's not stopping MLB from taking the chance to reboot the R.B.I. Baseball series. Most importantly, R.B.I. Baseball 14 was developed in-house by MLB's Advanced Media branch, also known as MLBAM, a team that's behind applications like At Bat and whose tech powers the WWE Network streaming service. Up until now, sport games have been all about licensing, so this shift also lets us know how Major League Baseball views that industry. Sure, the experience in R.B.I. Baseball 14 might not be as full-fledged as with, say, Sony's MLB 14 The Show, but it's still interesting to see a professional league leveraging its work as a technology company too.

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Why should you have to listen to a sports commentator who's obviously pulling for the other team -- or one who's just plain boring? That's the question Dolby's out to answer with its personalized audio demo here at NAB. The company's showing attendees how they could enjoy a TV experience tailored to their preferences. Following through with the sports example mentioned above, this means different options for commentators during a hockey game. If you're a basketball fan watching the Spurs take on the Pacers while talking with friends on Skype, the system will recognize the VoIP service and mute other audio when they're speaking. Maybe you're more into The Voice; Dolby's tech could bring you audio from your favorite judge, excluding the opinions you don't want to hear.

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We came away relatively impressed with the Fire TV during our brief hands-on. But we all know that units set up specifically for press demonstrations are hardly the best indicator of how a device will function in the real world. So we immediately went back to our lair and began putting the newest kid on the streaming block through its paces. Once away from the carefully controlled demonstration area, it became clear that the Fire TV is more of a mixed bag -- and still tied to its Android/Google TV roots -- than Amazon would like you to believe.

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The first thing you notice when you pick up the Fire TV is how incredibly dense it is. It's tiny and encased in black matte plastic, but it feels like a solid brick of aluminum. That's not terribly surprising when you consider all of the power Amazon has crammed inside this thing. Though we're not sure about the speeds on its quad-core CPU and dedicated GPU, the company claims it has three times the processing power of its rivals like Roku and Apple TV. In any case, it's clear the silicon inside is pretty beefy, and it's likely that the chassis is a giant heatsink.

During our brief time with the device, it was every bit as quick and impressive as it was during the on-stage demo. Voice searches were quick, if not exactly flawless thanks to the rather noisy demo area. It was less than a second from when I finished speaking to when the results popped up on screen (though, it seemed odd that Amazon assumed I meant "Klint Eastwood"). Despite its insistence that it handled search better than platforms like Roku, we'd have to say things aren't so cut and dry. Sure, you can voice search using the microphone on the remote, but searching with text requires the same cumbersome reliance on the remote's directional pad and an onscreen keyboard. Not to mention that Roku and Chromecast are also able to deliver voice search through their respective mobile apps.

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SONY DSC

The cat's out of the bag and... uh, on our head? Okay, we can do better than that, but what we're trying to say is that we just used Sony's new PlayStation 4 virtual reality headset: Project Morpheus. You already know the specs and all that good stuff; we're here to tell you what it's like using the still-in-prototype-form virtual reality headset for the PlayStation 4. Good news: It's pretty great! Surprise!

Join us below for a closer look.

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Two months ago, Sulon Technologies broke cover with a video showcasing a bulky augmented reality and virtual reality system. Fast-forward to today. The chunky backpack and headset combo has been replaced by a much, much smaller second prototype -- it's just a headset with a power cord coming out the back. Oh, and it's got a name: The Cortex. If you're a tinkerer, you can pre-order the dev kit version to follow this new prototype -- the company claims this more polished hardware will be shipping out in Q4 of 2014. It'll cost you $500 to get this particular peek into the future, though, so read on to find out what it's like wandering around with the dev kit's hacked-together portable predecessor on your melon.

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It's about that time again. That time for NCAA Division I schools to battle it out on the court during the month of March, all in search of men's basketball glory. Naturally, the NCAA, in partnership with CBS and Turner Sports, couldn't have kicked things off without revamping its beloved March Madness Live, both on the desktop and mobile apps. For the most part, however, the streaming service remains largely unchanged -- and we'd say that's a good thing. That said, there are a few new things coming to March Madness Live this year, such as apps for Kindle Fire, Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone 8 (we'll come back to the latter two in a bit).

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