iOS 8 is finally live for public consumption, which means it's time for all those third-party keyboards to make their App Store debut. Yep, at long last, devotees of Apple's mobile platform can swap out that boring ol' default keyboard for something different -- a neat trick Android users have enjoyed for some time now. Still, it's better late than never, and already there are a slew of alternative keyboards for iOS 8 clamoring for your attention. Here's just a few we think are worth checking out.

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Apple Untaxed Profits

Whatever you think of Apple's commitment to its user's security as of say... two weeks ago, CEO Tim Cook seems to be following up on his promise to bring more clarity to the company's efforts. Tonight he posted a letter to Apple customers on the company's website, launching a new section focused solely on "Apple's commitment to your privacy." There you'll find information information on how to use tools like two-factor authentication, recognize security threats and info on picking a strong password. Also included is the publicly available data on government requests and a little chest thumping on what Apple says it does to protect users that other companies (they mean Google) might not.

[Image credit: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite]

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Well folks, the rumors and leaks were true (as usual): the heated BlackBerry/Porsche Design love affair has once again borne fruit, this in time in the form of the new Porsche Design P'9983. At its core, we're looking at a device running BlackBerry 10.3 along with a few Porsche-produced bits like a custom wallpaper and watchface, but you're not going to buy this thing just for BBMing your dearest pals (did we mention you get a specific BBM PIN perfect for remote flaunting?). No, if anything, you'd buy this thing for its peculiar (some would say silly and overwrought) sense of style.

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Mint's Touch ID check

You're going to see a lot of apps taking advantage of iOS 8's expanded Touch ID support in the near future, but one of the bigger improvements is already here. Mint has updated its iOS app to let you use your fingerprint to sign in rather than rely on a passcode. While it's a simple step, it means that you can quickly check all your finances on an iPhone 5s, 6 or 6 Plus without compromising security -- you can thwart data thieves with a tough-to-crack code that you'll rarely have to enter yourself. There's no doubt that this safeguard will spread to other financial titles in short order, but it's good to see that an app many use daily is already locked down tight.

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Watching Netflix or Plex streams on your Chromecast is great, but what about when the game is on? Sling has enabled its apps on iPhone, iPad and Android phones (Android tablets coming soon) to help with just that situation. Just tap the Cast button in the apps, and you can send video to Google's $35 dongle. Similar to Sling's integration with Apple TV and Roku, once the video is playing, you can use the app as a remote control, or close it and do something else while the video keeps playing. The only bad news? Chromecast support requires one of the company's newer boxes: 350, SlingTV/500 or M1. Still, both devices already make sense for frequent travelers, and now they're better together. The SlingTV is also getting a tweak, as the Android phone and iPhone apps can now control its living room UI directly, without the included remote.

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Yelp on Android

The FTC is eager to crack down on any perceived online privacy violations, especially when they involve children -- and we just got a good demonstration of that eagerness today. Both Yelp and mobile app developer TinyCo have settled with the FTC over allegations that they knowingly scooped up kids' personal information without permission. Yelp is paying a $450,000 penalty because it didn't have an effective age screen in its apps, letting those under 13 sign up by themselves. TinyCo, meanwhile, is shelling out $300,000 after some of its kid-oriented games asked for email addresses in return for in-game currency. These aren't the biggest settlements we've seen by any stretch, but they'll hopefully serve as warning to any app creator that wants to collect your little ones' data.

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We've virtualized much of the rest of the modern life -- why not payments? Plane tickets, banking and many other aspects of our lives now live on our phones. Payments still exist in the world of paper and plastic.

Google has Google Wallet; Visa has payWave; MasterCard has PayPass; and American Express has ExpressPay. Apple just announced its own, with Apple Pay. If you've heard of any of these credit card services other than Apple's recently announced system and maybe Google's long-running program, we're impressed. You're in the minority; heck, one quarter of US citizens don't even own a standard credit card, let alone a virtualized one. But virtual payments are more prevalent by the year, and Apple Pay is giving the concept a much-needed publicity boost. So, all that said, let's talk about the future of payment.

Don't throw away your wallet just yet.

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iPhone 6 and 6 Plus

Apple is clearly hoping that its bigger iPhones will tempt you to switch from Android. It just launched a migration guide that helps move your stuff into the iOS universe, whether it's a contact list, internet account or media collection. Some of the advice is fairly self-evident; email and social networks should come across without a hitch, and you'll usually find App Store equivalents to any given Android program. You may find a few useful pointers, however, such as using iCloud as a go-between for your important documents.

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It's been a busy month for EE already, with updated pay-as-you-go tariffs and a break-up with Phones4u that's forced the latter to shut-up shop. The bustle continues, however, and today the 4G network's announced revamped SIM-only plans for those who don't need no subsidized handset. On a one-year contract, pricing starts at £10 per month for 250MB of data and goes all the way to £28 per month for 10GB. Committing to only a 30-day plan makes it all a little more expensive at £13 for 250MB and £31 for 10 gigs. The top three data allowances of 2GB, 5GB and 10GB also get access to EE's "double-speed" network, as well as free calls to 080 numbers. They are only transient deals, though, and for new customers those caps will be reduced to 1GB, 3GB and 5GB, respectively, come the end of January next year. We know how much you love tables, so there's a handy one after the break that lays out all the new plans and their prices.

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While Opera Max is slowly making official launches around the world, this cloud-based data-compression service has just nabbed another partner -- and it's a pretty big one, too. Today, the Norwegian company announced that MediaTek will be embedding its app in two of its LTE-enabled 64-bit chipsets: the octa-core MT6752 and the quad-core MT6732. What this means is that should manufacturers want to integrate Opera Max into their MediaTek-powered devices (our understanding is that this feature is optional), they wouldn't have to spend time on testing the app, ergo shorter time to market. And of course, the end user gets to load pages, music and video clips faster anywhere on the device (unlike how the Opera browser only compresses data that are loaded within it), while also saving "up to 50 percent" of bandwidth, courtesy of Opera's cloud servers. That said, the service doesn't process encrypted links, for obvious reasons. For those who aren't familiar with Opera Max, feel free to check out the new video after the break.

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Instagram's UK Users Get Ads

While Instagram has been monetising its app for nearly a year, UK users have enjoyed scrolling through timelines that are completely free of ads. Until today, that is. The company has taken to the service to share the very first sponsored post with UK users (shown above), letting them know that "over the coming weeks" it will begin displaying paid content their streams, whether they like it or not. Users are invited to tap the "Sponsored" label to learn more about a specific campaign, but the majority are likely to become acquainted with "..." button, which quickly hides them from view. The dream might be over but Instagram says it's starting out with only a "few" businesses, meaning you shouldn't be bombarded with ads when they begin rolling out.

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Facebook's megaphone-like approach to sharing makes it less than ideal for more private missives. Sharing private images or jokes with select people is something of a test of nerves. One slip of a drop-down menu, and your intimate photo could go global, rather than just to your "mates" privacy group. But, Facebook wants you to share in anyway, and to anyone you like with confidence it seems. According to TechCrunch, the social network's working on a "Moments" mobile app to help. Once again, Facebook would be taking a single-focused idea out of the main mobile app into a standalone one if sources are correct. The Moments app will reportedly use a visual, tile-based interface for you select the group or sub groups of people you wish to share your -- we assume -- moment with. If this sounds a lot like Google+'s "circles" mechanism, that's because it does. There's no word when Moments could find its way onto phones, so for now, you'll just have to run the gauntlet with current tools to avoid having your mom comment on bachelor(ette?) party photos.

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Philips will soon launch a couple of iPhone- and iPad-controlled devices, but they're not the company's usual phone docks or Hue smartlight models -- they're gadgets designed to help suppress persistent pain. The first device (above) called PulseRelief uses Transcutaneous Electronic Nerve Stimulation or TENS technology, which delivers electric pulses straight to your nerves. That's supposed to prevent pain signals from reaching your brain and to release endorphins, chemicals that make you feel good and happy. There are tons of similar gadgets out there (search for "TENS device" on eBay and Amazon to see what we mean), but Philips' version lets you choose from 60 intensity levels through its smartphone app.

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Moto Maker Live In The UK

Motorola's new Moto X might not be sale in the UK yet, but that isn't stopping the company from letting customers create their own designs ahead of its release. Today, for the first time, Brits can get to grips with Moto Maker, Motorola's web-based customisation tool, allowing them to choose the finish, colours, cases, storage and even engraving options for their Moto X before putting down (at least) £419.99 to buy one. Moto Maker comes to the UK with a number of additional customisations in tow, including a new leather finish (that'll cost £20 extra and adds to the traditional plastic and wooden options) and a choice to include metal accents on the power and volume buttons, speaker grilles and that big Motorola logo on the back. On the subject of storage, you'll be forced to pay an extra £40 if you want the 32GB model, as the Moto X doesn't come with a microSD slot. Currently, you can only use Moto Maker to create your bespoke design and email it to yourself, allowing you to pick it back up and apply it when the Moto X eventually goes on sale later this month.

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Can't wait for the Xbox One version of Goat Simulator's absolute madness and have an iOS device? (Update: Or an Android one?) Well, then Coffee Stain Studios has you covered. The team's not-at-all serious (or realistic) depiction of goat life is now available for your Apple-branded mobile gizmos, as spotted by the ever vigilant Wario64. A majority of the game's charm comes from how intentionally glitchy and broken it is, so don't be alarmed if, say, your hoofed avatar's head gets stuck inside a wall. Or worse. Depending on where you live, though, it might be cheaper to keep an actual goat that to download this $5 game to your smart device of choice.

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