The Apple Watch heart rate Glance

When Apple trotted out its first update for the Watch, fitness mavens were alarmed at the suddenly inconsistent heart rate tracking. Did Cupertino break one of its wearable's signature features? Well, not quite. Apple has posted an updated support page that indicates the change in heart tracking was intentional. Instead of getting your beats per minute every 10 minutes regardless of what you're doing, its new default behavior is to check only when you're staying still. You can still make the Watch check on the move by using the heart rate Glance (above) or starting an activity in the Workout app, but the change risks creating gaps when you're strolling down the street.

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After two furious days of news -- both expected and not -- Google I/O has finally come to a close. We're still summing up our thoughts about the show and what Google's new future looks like, but we wanted to take you on one last stroll through Moscone West as I/O wound down to see what it's like being in a playground for some of the smartest, craziest people in the world. Join us, won't you?

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It seems like a decent of chunk of Google's big news today deals with its partnerships. The search giant is already teaming up with Levi's to explore the realm of smart Jacquard clothes, and now Google has confirmed that it's been working with Qualcomm to build its Project Tango world-sensing cameras into the chipmaker's reference phone designs. Those Tango-phones will be seeded developers and devices makers for now, and thanks to the arcane decisions that ultimately define a company's device-making strategy, we might not ever actually see a consumer-ready Tango phone. Still, Google's long-term ambitions are pretty clear: It'd like to get these Tango devices into our pockets en masse, and a closer relationship with one of the world's biggest mobile chipmakers is a great way to do it.

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Remember Path, the social network for keeping in touch with your closest friends and family? Unless you live in Indonesia, probably not. And that's part of the reason why it ended selling its social networking apps to Daum Kakao, the Korean parent company of the messaging app KakaoTalk. Path was founded five years ago with a more intimate and well-designed take on social networking, and it snagged 10 million users in that time. But aside from some initial pickup in tech centers like San Francisco and New York City, most of its growth ended up being in Latin America and Southeast Asia (more than half of its users are based in Indonesia). Specifically, Daum Kakao is picking up the core Path app and Path Talk, a standalone chat app it launched last year. Path the company will live on with its animated GIF app Kong, and it likely has some other projects in the works too.

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A look at two alternatives to those $200 Beats headphones

Thanks to Beats, there's no shortage of $200 headphones on the market. But what about cans coming from folks known for their speakers rather than their rhymes? Given their heritage in the audio space, I had high hopes for both the Klipsch Reference On-Ear Premium headphones as well as Polk's Hinge Wireless Bluetooth cans. At first glance, they're pretty comparable: Both are foldable on-ear models with plush carrying bags and tight iOS/OS X integration. As it turns out, the similarities fell away quickly once I actually put them on my skull.

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We already know Apple is working on a fix for a recently discovered texting bug that can render your Messages app useless (and in some cases even reboot your phone), but now there's a faster solution for anyone affected. You just need to use Siri to read your unread messages and send a dictated reply, according to a support document Apple posted yesterday. After that, you'll be able to open the Messages app once again and delete the malicious thread. The messaging bug was originally uncovered by Reddit users, and it involves sending a note with a series of Unicode characters through any iPhone messaging app. Of course, this workaround is only a fix for people who already received one of the tainted messages -- you'll have to turn off notification previews for apps if you want to stay completely safe. It's unclear when Apple will deliver an update to solve the issue, but given how easy the bug is to exploit, we figure it's coming soon.

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Broadcasting live video from your smartphone has quickly become all the rage. The most popular enablers of this craze are Meerkat and Periscope, both of which aim to create a global community of streamers and voyeurs that find each other's feeds through open social networks. New player Skeegle, however, wants to do things a little differently, by making mobile live-streaming a more private affair. The premise is simple: you choose exactly who you want to broadcast to. Once you've downloaded the app, logged in with a Facebook account and associated your phone number with it (WhatsApp-style), you can start building groups from your phone's contact list (think "friends," "family," etcetera). When you stumble upon something worth streaming, you simply select the groups you'd like to be notified of your activity, start broadcasting, and that's it.

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The most striking part of the just released (on the web, iOS and Android) Google Photos is how familiar it feels if you've already been using Photos in Google+, or before that, Picasa. The biggest change I noticed early on is that by separating Photos from its attempt to launch yet another social network, Google is starting focus on stuff that both benefits its users, and that it does well: cloud storage and using information to narrow down searches. Now, it's a perfect fit for how most people use cameras everyday, from the ones in their phones to point-and-shoots (but maybe not your DSLR). With unlimited storage and machine learning that can link photos by the people in them or where they were taken it's ready to make sense of your massive image library.

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In no particular order, Google's invading our living rooms, our extremities, our skies, and — curiously — our Android phones. No, really! By announcing Google Now on Tap during today's I/O keynote, the company's going all-in on the idea that a Google smartphone isn't complete without the full power of the Knowledge Graph baked into it. And you know what? I think they're right. Even after just a few moments messing around with it, I don't ever want to use an Android device that can't do what Now on Tap can.

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Google may have been the first big tech company to push NFC payments, but it was Apple Pay that got the public excited about buying things with your smartphone. At a Google I/O session for Android Pay, the search giant announced that it was partnering with McDonalds and Papa John's Pizza to launch Hands Free, a payment system that looks suspiciously like the Pay with Square app (later called Square Wallet and discontinued). Customers walk in a store and say, "I'd like to pay with Google," and the cashier will see a photo of the customer and their name on their point-of-sale system. The service is initially launching in San Francisco in the coming months and those interested can sign up for the beta here. Details about the geofencing payment service are sparse, but it should use cards stored in the upcoming Android Pay.

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Now that electronics manufacturers are releasing more and more smartwatch models, you might be wondering what the authorities' stance is on using one while driving. Well, this clears things up a bit for our Canadian readers: a man named Jeffrey Macesin was recently pulled over and fined $120 for using his Apple Watch behind the wheel. Macesin told CTV News Montreal that the watch was inside a bag, and that he was only changing songs on it at that moment, since it was plugged into the car radio. He thought the cop only wanted him to get out of the way when he turned the cruiser's lights on, but the officer obviously thought the device was a cause of distraction.

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Didn't fancy sitting through the whole liveblog from this year's Google I/O keynote? We understand. Sometimes you just want to catch the key plays via the post-game show. And that's kinda why Engadget exists, after all. As always with Google's big developer event, there was a lot of ground covered in a relatively short space of time. Fear not, below are the things we think you most need to know.

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Google Play Store Developer Pages

Those rumors of Google letting Android app developers experiment with what you see in the Play Store? Yes, they're true. Creators can now conduct tests to see what pricing works best, or whether one icon color is more alluring than others -- you'll only view one of each while the test is ongoing. Also, app makers are getting Developer Pages (shown above) that showcase all of their apps, so you'll have a one-stop shop for everything from your preferred brand. If all goes well, you'll find more Android apps with prices you're willing to pay, and you won't have to scrounge quite so much to get every app you need.

Don't miss out on all the latest news and updates from Google I/O 2015. Follow along at our events page.

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Google I/O 2015

Google's Cloud Messaging is no longer just for sending alerts to Android devices or your web browser. The internet giant has announced that the service now pushes notifications to iOS devices as well -- your favorite app can deliver updates to all your gadgets using a single system. The Cloud Messaging update also introduces topics, so an app can ask you about getting only the notifications you care about. A news app can send you notifications about tech and world news, for instance, while skipping entertainment. These features will take a while to filter down to the software you use, but they promise to both keep your hardware in harmony and cut back on some noise.

Don't miss out on all the latest news and updates from Google I/O 2015. Follow along at our events page.

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Sometimes you still need navigation and destination info when you're offline. Google is delivering just that with offline Maps. Even when you're not connected (or in airplane mode), the app will still provide information on places in your searches. This means that you can browse hours, reviews and other important details for places like museums and restaurants. What's more, voice-guided turn-by-turn navigation is included as well for maps that you've saved for offline use. Unfortunately, there's no word on when the new tools will arrive other than a vague "later this year."

Don't miss out on all the latest news and updates from Google I/O 2015. Follow along at our events page.

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