Nexus 6

Motorola's Nexus 6 almost had a fingerprint sensor, but Apple spoiled the idea. In an interview with UK newspaper The Telegraph, former CEO Dennis Woodside (who now leads Dropbox) reveals that the handset's dimple was supposed to play home to a discreet recessed sensor, but its supplier couldn't meet its quality demands. "Apple bought the best supplier," Woodside explains, "so the second-best supplier was the only one available to everyone else in the industry and they weren't there yet." At least Moto didn't just, y'know, throw one in anyway.

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Moto X (2014)In his review of the second-generation Moto X last September, our Senior Mobile Editor Chris Velazco called it "a huge step forward from last year's model." He complimented the seamless feel of the edges and thought its improved OLED screen was "one of the nicest smartphone screens I've seen in a while." But not everything was pure love with the 2014 Moto X. The battery can squeeze out a day at most, and the front camera fails to be "consistently good" and is often slow to focus, with photos full of grain. But in spite of these flaws, Chris felt that the new Moto X "earned itself a spot in the pantheon of smartphone greats."

That's a pretty big proclamation to make; how well does it hold up? To find out, we turn to the discerning opinions of our loyal readers, who have taken to the product database page for the 2014 Moto X to share their own experiences with the phone. With a user average of 9.2, it was a definite improvement over the original Moto X (which averaged a score of 8.8), but would they agree with our reviewer's assessments?

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Craig Federighi talks about HomeKit at Apple's WWDC 2014 event

We hope you weren't in a big rush to outfit your household with devices that use Apple's HomeKit automation technology -- you may be waiting a little while. Recode tipsters claim that Apple started certifying HomeKit gear later than it wanted, pushing the release of many supporting gadgets (and their underlying chips) back to spring or later. While Apple hasn't said whether or not there's a delay, the company notes that multiple companies (such as Elgato and iDevices) formally unveiled their first HomeKit hardware at CES. In many cases, the finished goods won't ship until spring or summer.

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Android Cupcake, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich and Jelly Bean statues

You might not be happy that Google isn't fixing a web security flaw in your older Android phone, but the search giant now says that it has some good reasons for holding off. As the company's Adrian Ludwig explains, it's no longer viable to "safely" patch vulnerable, pre-Android 4.4 versions of WebView (a framework that lets apps show websites without a separate browser) to prevent remote attacks. The sheer amount of necessary code changes would create legions of problems, he claims, especially since developers are introducing "thousands" of tweaks to the open source software every month.

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Lumia 630

Microsoft promised Windows Phone users a free upgrade to Windows 10 at its event earlier this week, but it turns out not all phones will be getting the update. Through its Lumia Conversations blog, the company clarifies "not every phone will upgrade or support all possible Windows 10 features," adding that its goal is for "the majority of the Lumia phones running Windows Phone 8 and 8.1" to be upgraded. That's at odds with what the company's Twitter account has said in the past.

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Well, that was quick: Despite Microsoft saying that Windows 10 was coming to its misfit tablet, the Surface RT, that isn't quite the case. As Thurrott reports, Redmond is working on an update for Surface which will have "some of the functionality" of Windows 10. The SuperSite for Windows founder goes on to say:

"Since those [Windows RT and Surface RT/2] are the only Windows RT devices that ever sold in any measurable quantity, two conclusions are obvious. Other Windows RT devices may not be updated at all (i.e. this Windows 10 subset update may literally only be for Surface RT/2 devices). And more generally, Windows RT is dead."

And it very well may be. The RT platform's always been a bit of an odd duck with its inability to run standard Windows apps, and it looks this this could be Microsoft's kiss of death. You can read the official word from a Microsoft spokesperson after the break.

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Samsung has quite the diverse family of products, and for the last two years, a team of engineers have been working on yet another. Folks from its smartphone and washing machine teams are building a wearable sensor that monitors brainwaves to detect the early stages of a stroke. The result is a prototype known as the Early Detection Sensor and Algorithm Package (EDSAP): a device that keeps tabs on the electric impulses of the brain with the help of a smartphone or tablet. In theory, the sensor-packed headset will alert folks who are at risk for a stroke early on, so they can get to a doctor to prevent potentially serious and permanent effects. The EDSAP's tech collects brainwave info and beams it wirelessly to the companion device, determining the chances of a stroke within 60 seconds. What's more, when used for longer sessions, the setup can analyze neurological health in terms of stress, anxiety and sleep patterns.

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We liked the LG G Flex 2 enough to both bring it onstage at CES this year and put it in the running for our Best of Show awards. The curved flagship phone didn't go all the way in the end, but hey, if you happen to be in Korea this month a mere 800,000 won (around $737 domestically) will put one in your pocket. But, let's say you aren't in Korea and you'd rather hold out for the red model you see above to hit the States -- totally justified! In that case, the videos after the break will make the wait just a bit shorter.

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And the Un-carrier march continues unabated. This time, T-Mobile CEO John Legere address the consumer masses via YouTube to launch a new initiative that aims to help put a smartphone in the hands of anyone who wants one... and can pay their bills. Starting on January 25, T-Mobile's going to put less stock in your credit history and pay more attention to your payment history. If you've paid your dues on time over the past 12 months, you'll qualify for all those sweet, sweet no-money-down phone deals even if your FICO score looks a bit troubled. And new customers with less than sterling credit? They'll have to wait the 12 months before they get access to T-Mobile's carefully calculated largesse. Simple, no?

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Mobile phone service concept - Woman on the phone with question marks on a blackboard.

TalkTalk has long been a friend to the price-conscious consumer, offering low-cost TV, broadband and mobile services as alternatives to pricier options from the Skys and EEs of this world. In recent history, however, it's been exploring opportunities beyond just "the basics," investing in fibre infrastructure, linking up with O2 to eventually provide 4G mobile coverage, and buying Tesco's Blinkbox streaming service. The company's clearly making sure it can stay competitive when everyone becomes a quad-play provider, but it's not forgetting its core values, as evidenced by the new spread of low-cost mobile tariffs announced today. As is tradition when providers refresh their plans, they take more brain power than you'd like to wrap your head around. But, let me try and simplify things with only as many tables and words as are necessary.

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BlackBerry Classic

Think that net neutrality means all companies have the same, unfettered access to the internet without throttling or "fast lanes?" BlackBerry's CEO John Chen doesn't agree! In a letter to the Senate, he dismissed the need for tight "Title II" government oversight of wireless internet providers by calling it "excessive," without elaborating further. Then, he then took the conversation in a different, BlackBerry-centric direction. He said that rather than being just about internet freedom, wireless internet regulation needs to revolve around openness for devices and apps -- BlackBerry neutrality, if you will.

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ZURICH, SWITZERLAND - MARCH  14, 2014: Google Corporation Building sign.

Google's Docs, Sheets and Slides apps aren't easy to use on a phone's small screen at all, but this set of updates could make things just a bit more convenient for both iOS and Android users. Documents now come with real-time spell check, spreadsheets are now able to hide rows and columns, and presentations can lump similar shapes together. Even better, they all now work with Android TalkBack and iOS VoiceOver -- screen readers that will make the apps friendlier to the visually impaired -- though those who only need just a bit of help reading on a small screen can use the magnification tool instead. Finally, if you're using an iPhone or an iPad, you can start using your fingerprint to unlock the apps if you want to make sure no nosy workmate can get into your files. The updates are now rolling out for both mobile platforms and are now available on Google Play and iTunes.

[image credit: shutterstock]

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Vessel on an iMac and iPhone

Hulu's ex-CEO Jason Kilar has been extolling the virtues of Vessel, his would-be YouTube rival, for weeks. Today, though, you can finally find out whether or not it's all that it's cracked up to be -- Vessel has launched an invitation-only public beta. You'll have to watch on an iOS device or the web (Android is coming "soon"), but you'll otherwise have a month's worth of unfettered access to the service's early, professional-level content. There's no word on when Vessel will be available invitation-free. Even so, the beta is at least proof that the video hub exists as more than just a well-meaning concept.

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BlackBerry Passport in gold

BlackBerry's Passport is already a fairly exclusive device by dint of the company's small market share, but the Canadian smartphone maker just kicked things up a notch. It's now selling a very limited edition (just 50 units) Black & Gold Passport that lets you flout convention with more gusto than usual. The gold-colored trim, while eye-catching, sadly isn't real like we've seen in some third-party mods -- c'mon, BlackBerry! However, you do get both a real soft leather back and an engraving that lets everyone know how rare your phone is. And despite the tiny production run, this is decidedly more affordable than the Porsche Design BlackBerrys aimed at celebrities and oil barons. It'll cost you a (relatively) modest $899 to score the Black & Gold Passport in the US, and $999 in Canada.

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Lumia Camera will be the stock camera app on Windows 10 devices

In case you haven't noticed, team Engadget has spent a lot of time today covering Windows 10, Microsoft's next-gen operating system. Over the course of the company's three-hour keynote, we heard quite a bit more about its so-called universal apps, which will run on all manner of Windows devices, whether they be desktops, tablets, phones or even 84-inch pen displays. That said, there were a couple tidbits the company left out of its presentation. For one thing, we only just learned for sure that the Lumia Camera app -- the one included in the recent "Denim" update -- will actually be the default camera app on all Windows 10 devices. That means even if you're using a Windows device made by Samsung or HTC, you'll get the same photography experience as on a proper Lumia, at least as far as software and image editing go (actual image quality is a different story).

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