A Samsung Gear 2 running Android Wear

Don't despair if you bought Samsung's Gear 2 smartwatch, only to realize that you wanted the Android-powered Gear Live instead -- there might be a solution in the works. XDA tinkerer biktor_gj has successfully loaded Android Wear on the Gear 2 after four months of work. It's in a very rough state, as you might imagine. Only touch and rudimentary Bluetooth support are working right now. Android Wear doesn't have an open source project the way that regular Android does, so any support for audio, the motion sensor and other features will likely be tricky to implement. Biktor is hopeful that he'll get those working, however, and even this crude port is proof that your smartwatch isn't necessarily limited to its original software.

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Nokia Lumia 735

We hope you weren't counting on Nokia reviving its phone business. The Finnish firm is now bluntly denying claims that it's planning to return to making phones -- there are "no plans" to make or sell any, Nokia says. That's not surprising given both the company's expansion of its networking efforts and an agreement with Microsoft that it won't make phones until at least 2016. Simply speaking, Nokia wouldn't have the cash or permissions to build these devices in the near future. With that said, the company mentioned this fall that it was considering licensing its storied name to a third party handset maker. If you don't mind buying a Nokia-approved phone, there's still a chance (however small) that you'll get your wish.

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The floor at the CIA

Whatever you think about the morality of using mass surveillance to catch evildoers, the technology only works if people can use it -- just ask the CIA. The New York Times has obtained a declassified report revealing that that the agency was largely kept in the dark about the President's Surveillance Program (aka Stellarwind), which allows for bulk data collection, until at least 2009. Only the highest-ranking officials could use PSP as a general rule, and those few agents that did have access often didn't know enough to use it properly, faced "competing priorities" or had other tools at their disposal. To boot, there wasn't documentation showing how effective the program was in fighting terrorism.

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Sending directins to a phone using Google search

Sending Google Maps directions to an Android phone hasn't been that hard for a while, but it's now downright easy. Google has introduced a web feature that delivers instructions through a simple search. As long as your phone is properly linked to your Google account, you only have to search for "send directions" to get the ball rolling -- choose the route, hit send and your device will be ready to navigate. Only some people appear to have access to this option as of this writing, but there's a good chance that you'll get to check it out before too long.

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Google sign

Google might have just hinted at the future of its Glass headsets. The company has sent a mystery "smart BLE" (Bluetooth Low Energy) device to the FCC for approval, the A4R-CAP1, and there are a few telltale signs that it's one of Mountain View's wearables. Most notably, the product's digital FCC label (shown below) not only looks a lot like a Glass interface card, but requires that you swipe to see it -- that suggests a touchstrip, as you'd use on Google's eyepiece. Mentions of an Android-like firmware revision and a battery help, too. There's the possibility that this is another gadget that simply happens to use Glass-style navigation, but that seems less than likely. Don't be surprised if you're eventually plunking CAP1 on your head.

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Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon: These juggernauts are at the forefront of the tech industry. And with that success comes an ever-expanding workforce, and the need for a place to put them. To keep pace with growth, these companies have been making the requisite real-estate deals in order to build physical spaces to match their forward-thinking business approach. Fortunately, their designs are also more environmentally conscious than ever before. With the eyes of the world upon them, they've taken the well-being of the Earth, as well as their employees, into account, building innovative work spaces in an attempt to harmonize with the world around them. Below, we take a look at some of the steps these giants of industry have made over the years as they've moved from garage operations to vast campuses.

[Image: NBBJ]

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In case you were on the fence about grabbing one of Google's affordable Nexus tablets, you'd better jump off it pretty soon. The Nexus 7's been pulled from the Google Store, as spotted by TalkAndroid, and it almost assuredly isn't coming back -- especially since the Nexus 9 exists. That means if you still want one of the consistently updated 7-inch slates you'll have to hit places like Amazon while supplies last or wallow in regret for all that could've been. Namely, owning a tablet that (to me at least) is more comfortable to hold than the IPad Mini 2 and is essentially just as capable.

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It's Apple Watch day. And whether you received one already, or are stuck waiting a few weeks for it, you'll want apps to make the most out of your new wearable when the time comes. Thankfully, we here at Engadget are always thinking about you, the reader, so we've put together a list of third-party apps that stand out from the 3,000-plus expected to be available at launch. But first, let's talk about some essentials. The Twitter and Instagram Apple Watch apps, for starters, will let you check out tweets and view photos right on your wrist, among other things. Sports fans, meanwhile, have access to apps like ESPN, MLB At Bat and NBA Game Time, which makes it easy to keep up with scores without having to pull out your iPhone.

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You likely won't be able to repair the Apple Watch on your own -- shocking, we know. The gadget eviscerators over at iFixit put the Apple Watch under the knife today, just as people who've preordered the Watch have begun receiving their shipments. After a complete dissection, iFixit ended up giving the Apple Watch a repairability score of five out of 10 -- making it something you likely wouldn't want to mess with. Removing the screen was "difficult, but not impossible," iFixit said, and once you've dealt with that the battery is "quite easy to remove." But anything beyond the battery, including the Taptic Engine and Apple's S1 chip, is pretty much out of bounds. Basically, if you're getting an Apple Watch, consider an Apple Care plan, or be ready to pay hefty fees in case anything goes wrong.

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Unless you're constantly checking Twitter, there's a very good chance you're going to miss something cool. To help keep you from missing those very important tweets, Twitter introduced Highlights for Android. The feature notifies you up to twice a day about tweets Twitter believes are relevant to your interests. Twitter curates Highlights by looking at the popular accounts and conversations among the people you follow, tweets from people close to you and what's trending nearby. Users can also see the day's important tweets by tapping the new icon above the timeline that resembles two stacked cards. To turn on Highlights, navigate to Settings>Account Handle>Mobile Notifications and check the Highlights box. The feature is Android only for now, but Twitter says it will consider bringing it to other platforms in the future.

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After a very slow start, Microsoft's Surface finally seems to be hitting its stride. The company made $713 million from Surface sales last quarter, a 44 percent jump over last year, according to its latest earnings report. And yes, it's attributing much of that to the Surface Pro 3, which also saw strong sales during the previous quarter. While any bump is good, it's easy for Microsoft to report revenue growth when it's starting from a low point. Apple sold around $9 billion worth of iPads during the last quarter, for comparison. It's also worth noting that the company's third quarter doesn't include sales of the new Surface 3, which doesn't ship until next month. It'll be interesting to see if that model ends up helping its Pro sibling come next quarter. Before the Surface Pro 3, Microsoft's Surface sales weren't exactly pretty -- at one point it had to write off nearly $900 million in unsold units.

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Microsoft is sweetening the pot for schools looking to adopt its new hybrid tablet by giving them a 10 percent discount on the Surface 3, Type Cover and stylus. Normally, they cost $500, $130 and $50, respectively. On top of that, it's also offering a slightly cheaper Surface 3 model with just 32GB of memory and 2GB of RAM (the base Surface 3 has 64GB of storage). We don't yet know the price of that cheaper model, but expect it to be well below the $450 for the newly discounted 64GB Surface 3. Educational discounts aren't anything new -- it's already offering them for the Surface Pro 3, and it's something most other computer makers do -- but Microsoft is clearly trying to position the Surface 3 as an alternative to Chromebooks. Those cheaper Google-powered machines have been a huge hit in schools, thanks to their low prices and easy maintenance, but they can't run all of the software a full-fledged Windows machine can.

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Rumors of Google breaking into the wireless carrier game have been fodder for scoops, breathless reports and thinkpieces for years now, and for the longest time it looked like the search giant just couldn't make it happen. Yesterday Google put all that to rest. Project Fi is finally here (if invite-only and fully compatible with one phone) -- here's what you absolutely need to know about it.

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Sure, you probably don't need a smartphone with a massive 4,000mAh battery and a trio of SIM card slots, but thanks to Acer, your author can't stop thinking about one. Acer's so-called Liquid X2 is clearly well-equipped to play globetrotter, but (just like the Predator tablet) the company's spokespeople were awfully light on the details. Still, we know it comes with a 5.5-inch screen and a 64-bit octa-core processor thrumming away within its surprisingly sleek frame, along with a pair of 13-megapixel cameras nestled high along its face and back. At last, a device that takes selfies as seriously as HTC's Desire Eye.

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Google's Project Fi

For years, there have been rumblings that Google was looking to get into the carrier business, but it took until yesterday for the search giant to finally reveal what it's been working on. It's called Project Fi, and it's a unique new service that bears little resemblance to the traditional operator model. To provide mobile coverage, Google will be piggybacking on the networks of T-Mobile and Sprint -- two of America's largest carriers -- and using millions of pre-vetted WiFi hotspots. Throw in unlimited free international texting, WiFi tethering and data coverage in over 120 countries, and you've got something genuinely exciting -- if you live in the US and own a Nexus 6, at least. You see, if you hail from the UK, what Google's offering just isn't that innovative. Perks that may make waves over the pond are pretty commonplace here, and are fast becoming standard competitive procedure.

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